Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

What is the best way to write a no-op statement in Delphi?

Take this code:

if a=b then
  SomeOldStatement
else
  AnotherStatement;

And say that you temporarily want to rem out SomeOldStatement.

Would you just go for this solution:

if a=b then
  //SomeOldStatement
else
  AnotherStatement;

Personally I don't like the empty then section and would like to have something compilable in there...

if a=b then
  NoOp
  //SomeOldStatement
else
  AnotherStatement;
share|improve this question
    
are you tried asm nop end;? –  RRUZ Sep 24 '11 at 2:09
    
@RRUZ: Haven't tried but I have thought of this alternative. I guess it works fine, but it's not compatible with 64 bit where inline asm illegal. –  Jørn E. Angeltveit Sep 24 '11 at 2:14
    
procedure Noop; asm nop end; would work. And I guess that is the best solution. You should add your suggestion as an answer :-) –  Jørn E. Angeltveit Sep 24 '11 at 2:16
1  
Instead of "//SomeOldStatement" I prefer "//DoNothing". You can also use Assert(a=b) in this instance. –  Bob A Sep 24 '11 at 2:17
1  
@JørnE.Angeltveit, but if you put the nop instruction in a procedure called Noop you are adding a JMP and RET instructions and this does not have the same practical effect which adding directly the nop instruction. in this case is not better only has a empty procedure procedure Noop; begin end;? –  RRUZ Sep 24 '11 at 2:27

6 Answers 6

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Not sure why you need anything there at all (e.g. I'm happy with "then else").

But if you want something compilable there, I would do this:

if a=b then
  begin end
  //SomeOldStatement
else
  AnotherStatement;

An empty begin block is the best noop I know of in Delphi. It will produce no assembler code and thus no overhead.

share|improve this answer
    
I guess that an empty begin-end block is the best solution. (That's actually what I implemented while waiting of some better alternatives). The ; needs to go, BTW... –  Jørn E. Angeltveit Sep 24 '11 at 3:31
1  
@Jorn: Whoops and thanks. Taking semicolon out of answer. –  lkessler Sep 24 '11 at 4:08
2  
I really like the comment // DO NOTHING as a comment inside the empty begin/end block. It makes the code read through cleanly. –  Warren P Sep 24 '11 at 14:29
if a=b then 
  SomeOldStatement 
else 
  AnotherStatement; 

should be written as

if a=b then
begin
  SomeOldStatement;
end 
else
begin
  AnotherStatement; 
end;

now, you can comment out SomeOldStatement; with exactly the effect you are after, the debugger more accurately follows the flow of the code AND you avoid bizarre side effects in code like

if a=b then
  if b=c then
    statement1
  else
    if c=d then
      statement2;
  else
   statement2
else 
  statement3;

screw up your indenting, get a semicolon wrong, document out a line for testing and holy crap, things get ugly fast.

seriously, try figuring out if the code I just wrote there is even valid without a compiler pass.

now, guess what happens with this:

if a=b then
if b=c then
statement1
else
if c=d then
statement2;
// else
statement2
else 
statement3;

also:

if a=b then
  statement1;
  statement2;

can often do strange things, and even stranger things when you do

if a=b then
//  statement1;
statement2;

serious - just get in the habit of ALWAYS having begin ends in all your logic - it makes your code easier to follow, avoids side effects, avoids mental parsing errors, code parsing errors and commenting out side effects.

Plus, an empty begin/end is the same as your no-op.

share|improve this answer
2  
+1 Single/compound statement distinction is horrid, this is the workaround –  David Heffernan Sep 24 '11 at 6:38
    
+1 Good advice and nice effort outlining the pitfalls. –  Bob A Sep 24 '11 at 15:17

You can possibly use something like a:=a but, to be honest, I find that even uglier than a non-statement - you should code so that those that come after you will understand what you intended, and the command a:=a doesn't really follow that guideline.

Since this is only a temporary thing, I would just wear the fact that you have no executable code in there. If, as you say, Delphi still compiles it just fine, you have no issue.

If you want some code in there for a breakpoint, and there's no better way of doing it, I would consider temporarily doing the a:=a thing.

If it was going to be a more permanent change, you could instead consider the reversal of the condition so that you have no empty blocks at all:

if not (a = b) then
    AnotherStatement;

or, better yet:

if a <> b then
    AnotherStatement;
share|improve this answer
    
I agree that one should do some parallel programming with De Morgan in the situations where this is the final code. The reason why I try to avoid empty statements are described here: delphi.about.com/od/beginners/a/delphi-if-then-else-traps.htm –  Jørn E. Angeltveit Sep 24 '11 at 2:46
    
The optimizing compiler will probably optimize the a:=a away, so you won't get a breakpoint. –  lkessler Sep 24 '11 at 3:12
    
Setting "a := a" for an empty statement is costly and you may get buggy codes in case "a" type is an managed one (the value can be cleared out). –  APZ28 Sep 24 '11 at 14:37

In Delphi 2005 and subsequent versions, you can define a NoOp empty procedure and mark it as inline.

This way no code is generated unless you define {$INLINE OFF} or set Code inlining control to Off in Compiler Options.

procedure NoOp; inline;
begin
  // do nothing
end;

The resulting code is very clean:

if a=b then
  NoOp //SomeOldStatement
else
  AnotherStatement;
share|improve this answer

How about a=a? That's a no-op.

(I don't know Delphi, so syntax for the assignment may be wrong, but hopefully you can get the idea and correct the syntax if needed)

share|improve this answer
    
a=a is a comparison, not an assignment. a:=a is what you are looking for :-) –  Jørn E. Angeltveit Sep 24 '11 at 2:24

If statements without a begin end block are a bug waiting to happen and in this case adding in a begin end block will allow you to comment out your line without changing any more code.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.