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I have the following script in my javascript...

$.ajax({
    type: 'POST',
    url: 'http://www.example.com/ajax',
    data: {email: val},
    success: function(response) {   
             alert(response);
    }
});

And my php file looks like this...

    if ($_REQUEST['email']) {

$q = $dbc -> prepare("SELECT email FROM accounts WHERE email = ?");
$q -> execute(array($_REQUEST['email']));
if (!$q -> rowCount()) {

    echo json_encode(error = false);
}
else {

    echo json_encode(error = true);
}

    }

I cannot get either the variable error of true or false out of the ajax call?

Does it matter how I put the data into the ajax call?

At the minute it is as above, where email is the name of the request, and val is a javascript variable of user input in a form.

share|improve this question
    
Are you using firebug or a similar tool to view the AJAX request/response? –  rwilliams Sep 24 '11 at 2:12
    
I have firebug lite for chrome. The ajax request was sucessfull but was returning [object]:[object] before. –  Project V1 Sep 24 '11 at 2:17
1  
Good deal. Thanks for the update. FYI the chrome developer tools are pretty darn good themselves if you want to try to ween yourself off of firebug lite. –  rwilliams Sep 24 '11 at 2:25

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Try this instead. Your current code should give you a syntax error.

if (!$q -> rowCount()) {

    echo json_encode(array('error' => false));
}
else {

    echo json_encode(array( 'error' => true ))
}
share|improve this answer
    
This works but why does it have to be in an array? Thanks Interstellar –  Project V1 Sep 24 '11 at 2:13
    
Because json_encode() takes a mixed argument as its parameter, but more than that an array is the most logical structure to store a key, value pair in. The array eventually gets translated into {"error":true} –  aziz punjani Sep 24 '11 at 2:24
    
This works but how do I call the variable now? error isn't it, and I tried response['error'], response[error], response["error"]? This JSON stuff is annoying lol. –  Project V1 Sep 24 '11 at 2:24
    
both response.error or response['error'] should work. –  aziz punjani Sep 24 '11 at 2:27

In your code, the return parameter is json

$.ajax({
    type: 'POST',
    url: 'http://www.example.com/ajax',
    dataType: 'json',
    data: {email: val},
    success: function(response) {   
             alert(response);
    }
});

PHP FILES

if ($_REQUEST['email']) {

   $q = $dbc -> prepare("SELECT email FROM accounts WHERE email = ?");
   $q -> execute(array($_REQUEST['email']));
   if (!$q -> rowCount()) {
       echo json_encode(error = false);
       return json_encode(error = false);
   } else {

       echo json_encode(error = true);
       return json_encode(error = true);
    }
 }
share|improve this answer
    
Why are you echoing AND returning json_encode ? –  aziz punjani Sep 24 '11 at 2:27
    
json_encode(error=true) would give a syntax error. codepad.org/qSX1Nfpk –  aziz punjani Sep 24 '11 at 2:30
    
Yes, you are right, I thought the problem was without dataType. –  Shamrocker Sep 24 '11 at 2:34

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