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I wrote a piece of code to print n prime numbers:

class PrimeGen:
    def __init__(self):
        self.current = 2
    def genPrime(self, num):
        for i in range(num):
            while 1:
                for j in range(2, self.current/2 + 1):
                    if self.current % j == 0:
                        self.current = self.current + 1
                        break
                else:
                    break
            print self.current,
            self.current = self.current + 1

if __name__ == '__main__':
    p = PrimeGen()
    p.genPrime(5)

The code works fine. I get 2 3 5 7 11 as output. I tried to make the class iterable. Code below. But the output is 0 1 2 3 4. I could not quite figure out where I am going wrong. Any help is appreciated. Thanks

class PrimeIter:
    def __init__(self):
        self.current = 1

    def next(self):
        self.current = self.current + 1
        while 1:
            for i in range(2, self.current/2 + 1):
                if self.current % i == 0:
                    self.current = self.current + 1
                    break # Break current for loop
            else:
                break # Break the while loop and return
        return self.current

    def __iter__(self):
        return self

if __name__ == '__main__':
    p = PrimeIter()
    for p in range (5):
        print p,
share|improve this question
    
The nextmethod is deprecated and you're not even using the class you created. Just using the range –  JBernardo Sep 24 '11 at 2:49
    
Thanks a lot for your answers! Dumb oversight... I have been debugging for a while!! –  bdhar Sep 24 '11 at 2:51
    
This is a really slow way to generate primes. If you've got an upper limit on your primes, then the sieve of Erastothenes will perform better. –  misha Sep 24 '11 at 3:10
    
@misha: Thanks. i m just trying out some examples to learn iterators! generating prime numbers is not my intention –  bdhar Sep 24 '11 at 3:15

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You're using this code to print out the values:

for p in range (5):
    print p,

If you look at that, it's printing the values of the range. You probably want to print things from the prime iterator. itertools has some functions that may help:

for prime in itertools.islice(p, 5):
    print prime,

Additionally, you may want to consider using a generator:

def primes():
    current = 1
    while True:
        current += 1
        while True:
            for i in xrange(2, current // 2 + 1):
                if current % i == 0:
                    current += 1
                    break
            else:
                break
        yield current
share|improve this answer
    
Exactly what I was going to suggest. +1 –  Tyler Crompton Sep 24 '11 at 3:04
    
Your xrange is formatted incorrectly (part of it is currently displayed a comment). I'd edit myself, but edits must be 6 characters or more, for some reason. –  Symmetric Feb 22 '12 at 6:01
    
@Symmetric: Python comments start with #. // in Python is explicit integer division. The syntax highlighter must not be recognizing it as Python. –  icktoofay Feb 22 '12 at 6:03
    
Aha, that makes sense. I wasn't aware of the '//' operator. Thanks. –  Symmetric Feb 23 '12 at 6:09

Your problem is that you are reusing the variable p in your test code:

if __name__ == '__main__':
    p = PrimeIter() # first declaration of p
    for p in range (5): # second declaration of p
        print p,   # uses second declaration of p

I'd recommend using itertools.islice to get the first 5 elements of an iterator:

if __name__ == '__main__':
    p = PrimeIter()
    for x in itertools.islice(p, 5):
        print x,
share|improve this answer

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