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I have background of Java and Python and I'm learning R recently.

Today I found that R seems to handle objects quite differently from Java and Python.

For example, the following code:

x <- c(1:10)
print(x)
sapply(1:10,function(i){
            x[i] = 4
        })
print(x)

The code gives the following result:

[1]  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 10
[1]  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 10

But I expect the second line of output to be all '4' since I modified the vector in the sapply function.

So does this mean that R make copies of objects in function call instead of reference to the objects?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 15 down vote accepted

x is defined in the global environment, not in your function.

If you try to modify a non-local object such as x in a function then R makes a copy of the object and modifies the copy so each time you run your anonymous function a copy of x is made and its ith component is set to 4. When the function exits the copy that was made disappears forever. The original x is not modified.

If we were to write x[i] <<- i or if we were to write x[i] <- 4; assign("x", x, .GlobalEnv) then R would write it back. Another way to write it back would be to set e, say, to the environment that x is stored in and do this:

e <- environment()
sapply(1:10, function(i) e$x[i] <- 4)

or possibly this:

sapply(1:10, function(i, e) e$x[i] <- 4, e = environment())

Normally one does not write such code in R. Rather one produces the result as the output of the function like this:

x <- sapply(1:10, function(i) 4)

(Actually in this case one could write x[] <- 4.)

ADDED:

Using the proto package one could do this where method f sets the ith component of the x property to 4.

library(proto)

p <- proto(x = 1:10, f = function(., i) .$x[i] <- 4)

for(i in seq_along(p$x)) p$f(i)
p$x

ADDED:

Added above another option in which we explicitly pass the environment that x is stored in.

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Thanks ! But why not one write such code in R? Is there some potential risk or just a convention ? I think it's pretty normal to modify global objects in a function in other languages. –  Spirit Zhang Sep 24 '11 at 11:53
2  
In functional languages functions cannot have side effects. R is not that strict but its still true that R functions limit side effects. Its better to work the way it was intended to be used rather than try to write as if you were writing in another language. There are several object systems (S3, S4, Reference Classes). S3 is the most commonly used. S4 is much more complex. Reference Classes are a recent addition. You may wish to explore Reference Classes, in particular. There are also some user contributed packages that offer different paradigms: proto and R.oo (and possibly others). –  G. Grothendieck Sep 24 '11 at 12:11
    
@Spirit Plus you can use parent.frame(3) instead of .GlobalEnv to store x in a closure in which sapply was run, what would be much safer. (Why 3? 1-anonymous function frame, 2-sapply frame, 3-sapply enclosure) –  mbq Sep 24 '11 at 13:19

Yes, you're right. Check the R Language Definition: 4.3.3 Argument Evaluation

AFAIK, R doesn't really copy the data until you're trying to modify it, thus following the Copy-on-write semantics.

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Thanks Anatoliy! But would the copy proces take too much time and memory if the copied data are really large ? Or it doesn't actually copy the data, but just neutralize the modfication effect in the end of the function call? –  Spirit Zhang Sep 24 '11 at 7:39
    
There is a copy, but the "x" inside the function is not the same object as the one outside the function. There are environments and you have one x in the calling environment and a different x in the function environment. Only by assignment of the result will the changes be visible in the calling environment. –  BondedDust Sep 24 '11 at 13:20

The x that is inside the anonymous function is not the x in the global environment (your workspace). It is a copy of x, local to the anonymous function. It is not so simple to say that R copies objects in function calls; R will strive to not copy if it can, though once you modify something R has to copy the object.

As @DWin points out, this copied version of x that has been modified is returned by the sapply() call, your claimed output is not what I get:

> x <- c(1:10)
> print(x)
 [1]  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 10
> sapply(1:10,function(i){
+             x[i] = 4
+         })
 [1] 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4
> print(x)
 [1]  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 10

Clearly, the code did almost what you thought it would. The problem is that the output from sapply() was not assigned to an object and hence is printed and thence discarded.

The reason you code even works is due to the scoping rules of R. You really should pass in to a function as arguments any objects that the function needs. However, if R can;t find an object local to the the function it will search the parent environment for an object matching the name, and then the parent of that environment if appropriate, eventually hitting the global environment, the work space. So your code works because it eventually found an x to work with, but was immediately copied, that copy returned at the end of the sapply() call.

This copying does take time and memory in many cases. This is one of the reasons people think for loops are slow in R; they don't allocate storage for an object before filling it with a loop. If you don't allocate storage, R has to modify/copy the object to add the next result of the loop.

Again though, it isn't always that simple, everywhere in R, for example with environments, where a copy of an environment really just refers to the original version:

> a <- new.env()
> a
<environment: 0x1af2ee0>
> b <- 4
> assign("b", b, env = a)
> a$b
[1] 4
> c <- a ## copy the environment to `c`
> assign("b", 7, env = c) ## assign something to `b` in env `c`
> c$b ## as expected
[1] 7
> a$b ## also changed `b` in `a` as `a` and `c` are actually the same thing
[1] 7

If you understand these sorts of things, reading the R Language Definition manual which covers many of the details of what goes on under the hood in R.

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Oops - I wrote this hours ago (morning UK time) but must have got sidetracked and didn't click the submit button. –  Gavin Simpson Sep 24 '11 at 18:10

You need to assign the output of sapply to an object, otherwise it just disappears. (Actually you can recover it since it also gets assigned to .Last.value)

x <- c(1:10)
print(x)
 [1]  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 10
x <- sapply(1:10,function(i){
             x[i] = 4
        })
print(x)
 [1] 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4
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Sorry, but this does not answer the question and is just confusing. –  mbq Sep 24 '11 at 8:27
    
Now I am the one confused. The OP created a vector of 4's and then did nothing with it. If he wanted "x" to change, he needed to use an assignment operation. I thought I precisely answered the question. –  BondedDust Sep 24 '11 at 12:54
    
You seem to suggest that v<-sapply(...,function(...){...v...}) construct somehow exports v from functions environment to the parent one. Not to mentioned the question was quite directly about whether R makes call-by-copy or call-by-reference. –  mbq Sep 24 '11 at 13:03
    
Yes, I am suggesting the v <- sapply(...) is exporting the .Last.value to the globalenv() and that the assignment function <- is "making it stick." Formally speaking it is "pass-by-promise" but in practice it is more like "pass-by-value". It is not "exporting x", and I did not say that it was. It is exporting values and the <- is naming them in a durable manner. –  BondedDust Sep 24 '11 at 13:24
    
But = is just returning 4, not a promise of x[i]; this way it is equivalent to x<-sapply(1:10,function(ignoreIt) 4). –  mbq Sep 24 '11 at 13:40

If you want to change a "global" object from within a function then you can use non-local assignment.

x <- c(1:10)
# [1]  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 10
print(x)
sapply(1:10,function(i){
            x[i] <<- 4
        })
print(x)
# [1] 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4

Although in this particular case you could just have it more compactly as x[]<-4

That is, by the way, one of the nice features of R -- instead of sapply(1:10,function(i) x[i] <<- 4 or for(i in 1:10) x[i]<-4 (for is not a function, so you don't need <<- here) you can just write x[]<-4 :)

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