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I'd like to know if it is possible to use an expression as a variable/parameter in C#. I would like to do something like this:

int x = 0;
public void g()
{
   bool greaterThan = f("x>2");
   bool lessThan = f("x<2");
}
public bool f(Expression expression)
{
   if(expression)
       return true;
   else
       return false;
}

Here's what I don't want to do:

int x = 0;
public void g()
{
    bool greaterThan = f(x, '<', 2);
}

public bool f(int x, char c, int y)
{
    if(c == '<')
       return x < y;
    if(c == '>')
       return x > y;
}

Really what I'm getting at is a way to get around using a switch or series of if statements for each of: < > <= >= == !=. Is there a way to do it?

Edit: Suppose that the expression is a string, like "x < 2". Is there a way to go from the string to a predicate without using a series of if statements on the condition?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Its very possible, just not in the exact syntax you have.

int x = 0;
public void g()
{
   bool greaterThan = f(i => i > 2, x);
   bool lessThan = f(i => i < 2, x);
}
public bool f(Func<int,bool> expression, int value)
{
   return expression(value);
}

Actually, this should be closer to what you want.

int x = 0;
public void g()
{
   bool greaterThan = f(() => x > 2);
   bool lessThan = f(() => x < 2);
}
public bool f(Func<bool> expression)
{
   return expression();
}


Reply to Edit

If you want be able to say f("x < 2"), it's going to be almost impossible. Ignoring parsing it (which could get nasty), you have to capture the value of x, but its just a character to f, which makes it pretty much impossible.

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Cool. I edited my question a little as follows: Suppose that the expression is a string, like "x < 2". Is there a way to go from the string to a predicate without using a series of if statements on the character? –  David Hodgson Apr 15 '09 at 21:35
1  
If it's actually a string, there isn't going to be an easy and quick answer. But if you mean you want to type f(x > 2);, then just make f take a boolean parameter. –  Samuel Apr 15 '09 at 21:44
    
Drats, ok. Thanks for the response. –  David Hodgson Apr 15 '09 at 22:05
    
You definitely don't want to be writing your own parser, but you can use the parser from the Dynamic LINQ library. See my answer. –  Tom Lokhorst Apr 15 '09 at 22:48

If you really want to pass around code for this, you want a Predicate:

int x = 0;
public void g()
{
   bool greaterThan = f(i => i>2, x);
   bool lessThan = f(i => i<2, x);
}
public bool f(Predicate<int> expression, int value)
{
   return expression(value);
}

Otherwise, if you just substitute bool for Expression in your first example your code would compile just fine:

int x = 0;
public void g()
{
   bool greaterThan = f(x>2);
   bool lessThan = f(x<2);
}
public bool f(bool expression)
{
   if(expression)
       return true;
   else
       return false;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Wow, that downvote is completely uncalled for. This answer is correct and more in line with what the questioner wanted in terms of syntax. –  Samuel Apr 15 '09 at 21:28
    
I had a placeholder that was just the first sentence, took me too long to flesh it out. –  Joel Coehoorn Apr 15 '09 at 21:29
    
Actually, you cannot just call expression(). You have to pass in an int. –  Samuel Apr 15 '09 at 21:31
    
Yeah: fixed. Curse only having vs2005 available here! –  Joel Coehoorn Apr 15 '09 at 21:32
1  
Sorry, I edited the question a little: is there a way to go from a string to a predicate without if statements on the condition? For example: string s = "x > 2"; string t = "x < 2"; bool b = f(s); ? –  David Hodgson Apr 15 '09 at 21:46

Unless I'm missing something... why don't you just do:

bool greaterThan = x > 5;
bool lessThan = x < 5;

A boolean comparison already is an expression...

Edit:

So for your function, just pass a bool:

public void f(bool expression) 
{
    // expression is either true or false...
}

f(x<5); // called like this
share|improve this answer
    
The main difference between your answer and the other answers in this thread is when the comparison is executed. Your code runs immediately, the other code runs only when expression is called. This can be useful if you don't always need to know greaterThan and x is expensive to compute. –  Tom Lokhorst Apr 15 '09 at 21:35
    
That is assuming x is a function call or another "delayed" expression. –  Tom Lokhorst Apr 15 '09 at 21:36
    
Thanks for clarifying, I don't get to use .NET 3.0 so I'm not as familiar with lambda expressions as I should be –  John Rasch Apr 15 '09 at 21:43

Edit: Suppose that the expression is a string, like "x < 2". Is there a way to go from the string to a predicate without using a series of if statements on the condition?

As some people have already mentioned; if you want to be able to use a string, you need parsing. You don't really want to write your own C# parser, luckily, some people at Microsoft already did that with Dynamic LINQ.

Here is a solution to your specific question:

public void g()
{
    int x = 0;

    bool greaterThan = f("x > 2", x);
    bool lessThan = f("x < 2", x);
}

public bool f(string expression, int x)
{
    ParameterExpression xExpr = Expression.Parameter(typeof(int), "x");

    LambdaExpression e = DynamicExpression.ParseLambda(
        new ParameterExpression[] { xExpr }, typeof(bool), expression);

    return (bool)e.Compile().DynamicInvoke(x);
}

Now, obviously, this will blow up on the slightest typo in the string. You really need to be thinking about whether you actually need this. But if you really do, you can use the DynamicExpression.ParseLambda method to parse strings into LambdaExpressions.

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I don't really really need to, but that's awesome. I'll try it out. –  David Hodgson Apr 15 '09 at 23:29

Edit: Suppose that the expression is a string, like "x < 2". Is there a way to go from the string to a predicate without using a series of if statements on the condition?

There are several tricks you can use to turn strings into code in .Net: CodeDom, Reflection.Emit, or even scripting the compiler in the shell. However, none of these are as simple as a quick eval() in scripting languages, and this is usually frowned upon in .Net anyway unless you really know what you're doing.

Instead, .Net provides the System.Addin namespace as a safer way to allow for user extensions to your application.

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