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Integer getElement( List<Integer> list ) {

   int i = Random.getInt( list.size() );

   return list.get( i );

}

The question: while this function has been called from a thread, IS there a way the list passed to this function can be modified by another thread?

share|improve this question
    
I don't know why people are upvoting this question. For a start, "thread safe" and "can be modified by another thread" do NOT mean the same thing. – Stephen C Sep 24 '11 at 11:50
    
@StephenC: Agreed. "thread safe" is "can be modified by another thread" SAFELY. – 卢声远 Shengyuan Lu Sep 24 '11 at 12:12
    
Ok... modified the question – Mocha Oct 4 '11 at 21:05
up vote 6 down vote accepted

No. java.util.List doesn't guarantee thread safety. The list can be changed between list.size() and list.get() by another thread. Moreover memory inconsistency is also a problem.

I could think three ways to solve it:

  1. Use immutable list. Collections.unmodifiableList(list) is fine, Guava's ImmuntableList is better.
  2. Synchronized the list. but you have to synchronize the list instance all over the program.
  3. List in java.util.concurrent. It's a sophisticated concurrency solution.
share|improve this answer
3  
This will also not work because another thread can modify it without synchronizing on it. – Miserable Variable Sep 24 '11 at 10:40
    
@Hemal: you are correct. I removed my wrong code in my answer. – 卢声远 Shengyuan Lu Sep 24 '11 at 10:45
1  
new ArrayList<Integer>(list) can cause IndexOutOfBoundsException exception, just as list.get( i ) can. – Miserable Variable Sep 24 '11 at 11:07
    
@Hemal: you are always correct:) – 卢声远 Shengyuan Lu Sep 24 '11 at 11:48
1  
More information in the answer on what you mean by "memory inconsistency" would improve the answer; right now it's ill-defined. The memory is always consistent, the broken part is what different threads think is located in the memory. – jprete Sep 24 '11 at 17:30

The list being passed into your function is a reference to a list object. If any other threads have references to the same list object, then this is not thread safe.

share|improve this answer
    
I thought all references to parameters are passed by value in Java??? Doesn't this apply here? – Mocha Oct 5 '11 at 17:56
1  
You are passing the reference by value, but it is still a reference to the same object. – driis Oct 5 '11 at 19:06
> Integer getElement( List<Integer> list ) {
> 
>    int i = Random.getInt( list.size() );
> 
>    return list.get( i );
> 
> }

The question: while this function method has been called from a thread, IS there a way the list passed to this function can be modified by another thread?

(first Java doesn't have "functions", it has "methods")

It DEPENDS on the List implementation. Integer is immutable and if you're List implementation is immutable and correctly implemented, then the list cannot be modified and is completely threadsafe.

If you're List implementation is not immutable, then, yes, the list can be modified by another thread.

An example of an immutable List implementation would be, in the excellent Google Guava API, the ImmutableList which extends Java List and which is fully threadsafe. There are other examples of fully immutable List implementation and they are fully threadsafe (and of course are typically meant to be used with completely threadsafe objects, like the fully immutable Integer class).

share|improve this answer
1  
It could also be pointed out that it's 2011 and that by now the benefits of immutable data structures seems to be well understood by many people for they simplify both concurrency and reasoning about program behavior. And you do not necessarily need to be working with "functional" languages like Haskell or Clojure to benefits from the amazing simplicity and power that immutable data structures provide: all you need to do is use good APIs mimicking the power of functional languages. The impressive Functional Java API certainly does come to mind. – SyntaxT3rr0r Sep 24 '11 at 11:50

Is a list passed to a function thread safe in Java?

A list 'passed to a function' is the same as any other list. It is threadsafe if the list is already threadsafe, or if no other thread can see the list.

share|improve this answer
2  
Define threadsafe. For OP it is not threadsafe if it can be modified while getElement is accessing it. Which kind of threadsafe List guarantee that behavior? – Miserable Variable Sep 24 '11 at 10:35
2  
@Hemal Pandya there is only one kind of threadsafe. I cannot make any sense of this comment or your question. – EJP Sep 24 '11 at 10:41
    
EJP the downvote is not from me but considering you can get it wrong with 15K score I think you should take back your downvote on @TJR (if indeed it was you who downvoted) – Miserable Variable Sep 24 '11 at 10:43
    
No, there are multiple types of threadsafe. Compare for example Vector and ArrayList. But that is not what OP means here. He is asking if it can be threadsafe such that no other thread can modify it while getElement is accessing it. You wrote the list is threadsafe if it is already threadsafe. By "already" I assume you mean at the call site. So you mean that there is some data structure that will prevent modification of the list while getElement is accessing it. Which data structure is that? – Miserable Variable Sep 24 '11 at 10:51
2  
Could please everyone stop upvoting the silly comments from Hemal Pandya? A Google Guava ImmutableList of Integer (which is also immutable) is FULLY IMMUTABLE AND THREADSAFE and this is a FACT. – SyntaxT3rr0r Sep 24 '11 at 11:22

Is a list passed to a function thread safe in Java?

The question: while this function has been called from a thread, IS there a way the list passed to this function can be modified by another thread?

This is about thread-safety and specifically about the list instance. It depends on the concrete class of the list instance is (it's concurrent and mutability behaviors). If that instance is mutable, it matters on the visibility/exposure of that list.

I've modified your example in hopes of better understanding the question and provide more concrete solutions:

private void method1 {
  final List<Integer> list = new ArrayList<Integer>();
  list.add(Integer.valueOf(1));
  // Add the hypothetical mutator from another Thread
  new Thread(new Runnable(){
    public void run() {
      list.clear(); // if this where to happen between first & second access in getElement an IndexOutOfBoundsException would occur
    }
  }).start();
  Integer someInt = getElement(list);
}

// this is not thread-safe
private Integer getElement(List<Integer> list) {
  int len = list.size(); // first access to list
  int idx = Random.getInt(len);
  Integer retval = list.get(idx); // second access to list
  return retval;
}

Two ways:

  1. concurrent instances
  2. immutable

concurrent list instances:

  • java.util.concurrent.CopyOnWriteArrayList
  • java.util.Collections.synchronizedList()

Given the above code, here are some options on how to make getElement thread-safe.

immutable

Best: make list immutable (so that synchronization not necessary)

final List<Integer> list1 = Arrays.asList(1);

// or Guava's ImmutableList
final List<Integer> list2 = ImmutableList.of(1);

// the reference to the underlying mutable list is now hidden
final List<Integer> list3 = getList();    
private List<Integer> getList() {
  List<Integer> list = new ArrayList<Integer>();
  list.add(1); // mutate the list
  return Collection.unmodifiableList(list);
}

Con: causes a new problem to solve with the mutator. Understanding the whole problem would be needed to resolve that.

concurrent

1) Defensive copy in getElement() in combination with concurrent instance.

private Integer getElement(Collection<Integer> list) {
   final List<Integer> copy;
   synchronized (list) { // needed if Collections.synchronized*()
     copy = new ArrayList<Integer>(list);
   }
   return copy.get(Random.getInt(list.size()));
}

Con: performance to copy

2) Rewrite getElement() so that it only uses an iterator with a concurrent instance

// This is just top-of-the-head, 
private <T> T getElement(Iterable<T> list) {
   synchronized(list) { // needed if Collections.synchronized*()
     for(T elem : list) {
       // not even distribution of results, look for better algorithm
       if (Random.nextBoolean()) {
         // this is the one
         return elem;
       }
     }
   }
   return getElement(list); // put in a better fail-safe than this
}

Con: current implementation does not provide a uniform distribution


There isn't an easy way to solve concurrency.

share|improve this answer
    
Doesn't answer the question. – EJP Sep 24 '11 at 10:31
2  
TJR Collections.unmodifiableList(list) returns an an unmodifiable view. The underlying list can be modified. This only means that the getElement method itself cannot modify it. On the other hand @TJR, who seems to have downvoted you also seems to be mistaken that there can be a "threadsafe" list that can guarantee this behavior. – Miserable Variable Sep 24 '11 at 10:39
2  
@Hemal Pandya: I didn't downvote anyone (just in case you wonder) but having real immutable lists is SO useful that there are a several real immutable collections available for Java. They only give you references to fully constructed lists that CANNOT be partially constructed and that CANNOT be modified once you get them, hence they ARE perfectly thread-safe. Google's Guava's ImmutableList comes to mind (which extends ImmutableCollection<E> and implements List<E>). Trove, Functional Java, and a lot of other APIs do provide immutable lists too. – SyntaxT3rr0r Sep 24 '11 at 11:18
    
@SyntaxT3rr0r +1 for immutable. Immutable anything is good. And I am not vote police :) – Miserable Variable Sep 24 '11 at 11:31

As other have explained there is no way (or it is at least very difficult) for getElement to ensure that the List cannot be modified while the method is accessing it. If another Thread modified is to reduce it size less then random int generated on fist line then the second line will throw IndexOutOfBoundsException.

The only option is to ensure that all threads that have access to the List only do synchronized access. That is:

Integer getElement( List<Integer> list ) {
   synchronized(list) {
       int i = Random.getInt( list.size() );
       return list.get( i );
   }
}
// some method that modifies the list
void modify(List<Integer> list ) {
   synchronized(list) {
       ....
   }
}

Note that even though getElement will succeed there is no guarantee that the element will still exist in the list when the caller uses that element. To ensure that, the callers also need to synchronize:

// Thread 1
synchronized (list) {
    Integer someElement = getElement(list);
    use(someElement);
    // use can be outside the synchronized block if it is ok to use 
    // an element that is no longer in the list
}
//Thread 2
synchronized (list) {
    modify(list); // call some function that modifies the list
}

A less error-prone approach is to implement a List class that requires it to be locked before it can be accessed. The usage would be as follows:

try {
    list.lock();
    Integer someElement = getElement(list);
    use(someElement);
} finally {
    list.unlock();
}

This looks somewhat like the previous approach (and will look even more so with try-with-resources) the difference is that the List methods get/set etc throw an exception if they are being accessed without acquiring a lock.

EDIT: This of course applies only when using mutable lists. The scenario is entirely different when using immutable lists, though you will still need some synchronization mechanism if the element need to be in the list when it is used.

share|improve this answer
1  
Looks like the downvote brigade has taken a fondness to this question as well :) – Miserable Variable Sep 24 '11 at 11:46
3  
I have not downvoted, but your answer really looks like a bunch of outdated practices. It is so strange and ineffective to do manual synchronization on collections, when there are a lot of cool concurrent non-blocking implementations around. – Andrey Sep 24 '11 at 12:00

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