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I am attemptting to attach a small CMS to a website I am creating. However I have come across a small problem. The CMS uses PHP functions for inserting menus, these PHP functions create the HTML. The particular function I wish to use (treemenu) creates a nested ul li that can then be used for a drop down menu. However the nested ul li is structured like so:

<li>Projects (Menu Level 1)</li>
    <ul>
        <li>Project 1 (Menu Level 2)</li>
        <li>Project 2 (Menu Level 2)</li>
        <li>Project 3 (Menu Level 2)</li>
    </ul>
<li>News (Menu Level 1)</li>
<li>Contact (Menu Level 1)</li>

When creating a drop down menu in CSS I believe the Menu Level 1 li should wrap its children like so:

<li>Projects (Menu Level 1)
    <ul>
        <li>Project 1 (Menu Level 2)</li>
        <li>Project 2 (Menu Level 2)</li>
        <li>Project 3 (Menu Level 2)</li>
    </ul>
</li>
<li>News (Menu Level 1)</li>
<li>Contact (Menu Level 1)</li>

I have never before worked with PHP and therefore would not know how to alter the function in order to accomplish the above. I would hope it would be a simple change. Below is the PHP function that outputs the first example structure:

function treemenu($generat=0) {
global $pagenum, $menu, $selected, $extension, $set;
$count=0;
$out="\n";
$intend=0;
while($menu[$count][0] != "") {
	if(strpos($menu[$count][3],"#") === false) {
	if($menu[$count][2]=="0" && $intend==2) {
		$intend--;
		$out.="</ul>\n";
	}
	if($menu[$count][1]=="0" && $intend==1) {
		$intend--;
		$out.="</ul>\n";
	}
	if($menu[$count][1]!="0" && $intend<1) {
		$intend=1;
		$out.="<ul>\n";
	}
	if($menu[$count][2]!="0" && $intend<2) {
		$intend=2;
		$out.="<ul>\n";
	}
	$out.="<li class=\"LNE_menu\"><a ";
	if($menu[$count][4]==$selected['name'])
		$out.= 'class="selected" ';
	if(strpos($menu[$count][3],"*"))
		$out.='href="'.str_replace("*", "",$menu[$count][3]).'">';
	elseif($generat)
		$out.='href="'.$menu[$count][3].".".$set['extension'].'">';
	else
		$out.='href="'.$set['indexfile'].'?page='.$menu[$count][3].'">';
	$out.=$menu[$count][4]."</a></li>\n";
	}
	$count++;
}
return $out;
}

Could anyone possibly point me in the right direction as to how to make the closing li tag of a level 1 menu item wrap the ul immediately after, as in the second example?

share|improve this question
    
Bejesuz that's ugly! Whomever wrote that should be flogged. –  troelskn Apr 15 '09 at 21:51
    
A good example of bad PHP, perhaps someone can help redeem this by proividing some good PHP. –  Ross Apr 15 '09 at 21:53
    
Haha! Do you think that what I am after is a small change to that code? –  Ronnie Apr 15 '09 at 21:55
    
not a small change - just a small, recursive function. –  Alister Bulman Apr 15 '09 at 21:56
    
that looks like a project for ... captain recursion! i'd help you (writing a function that does what you want is easy), but it would be better if i knew more about the data structure you're using. –  stefs Apr 15 '09 at 22:00

5 Answers 5

up vote 8 down vote accepted

This would be a excellent example of the use of recursion. An array (with sub-arrays within it) defines each level, and a function loops, calling itself whenever it finds a new array to process. As long as the function cleans up appropriately (closing the </li> & </ol>), it's largely automatic.

<?php
// I know which function I'd rather write....
$tree = array('Projects (Menu Level 1)',
              array('Project 1 (Menu Level 2)',
                    'Project 2 (Menu Level 2)',
                    'Project 3 (Menu Level 2)'),
              'News (Menu Level 1)',
              'Contact (Menu Level 1)');

// now quake beneath the power of this fully operational recursive function!
function olLiTree($tree)
{
    echo '<ul>';
    foreach($tree as $item) {
        if (is_array($item)) {
            olLiTree($item);
        } else {
            echo '<li>', $item, '</li>';
        }
    }
    echo '</ul>';
}
olLiTree($tree);  // kick off from the top level
share|improve this answer
2  
You’re generating invalid HTML. The nested <ul> needs to be inside a <li>. –  Gumbo Apr 15 '09 at 22:15
    
i'd avoid echoing inside the function, bad style imho. –  stefs Apr 15 '09 at 22:33
    
Both very true. But it's an example of recursive techniques, not of highest quality HTML & library design. I do those with more than 2 minutes notice. –  Alister Bulman Apr 15 '09 at 22:36
    
I'm not sure why this answer was marked as accepted, since it doesn't actually solve the original problem (because sub-menu "ul" tags are outside the "li" tags instead of inside them). For a proper solution, see stackoverflow.com/questions/2452305/php-function-generate-ul-li –  Jordan Lev Aug 11 '11 at 22:59

A simple function is all you need.

function unorderedList($val)
{
    if (is_array($val)) {
    	return '<ul><li>' . 
    			implode('</li><li>', 
    				array_map('unorderedList', $val)) . 
    		'</li></ul>';
    } else {
    	return $val;
    }
}

Test code:

$menu = array('Projects (Menu Level 1)',
              array('Project 1 (Menu Level 2)',
                    'Project 2 (Menu Level 2)',
                    'Project 3 (Menu Level 2)'),
              'News (Menu Level 1)',
              'Contact (Menu Level 1)');


echo unorderedList($menu);
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks OIS, I understand that this is all I need now. However I do not have the knowledge to implement this as I would need to take into account other variables such as $pagenum, $menu, $selected, $extension, $set, which are used. I wish i could simply alter something in the original code. –  Ronnie Apr 15 '09 at 22:29

It appears Topbit already beat me to this, but mine is slightly differs in that it doesn't echo the value straight to the output stream, but saves it in a variable that you may echo at your convenience:

<?php

function GenerateMenu($arr)
{
    $output = "<ul>\n";
    foreach($arr as $val) {
    	if (is_array($val)) {
    		$output .= "<li>\n" . GenerateMenu($val, $output) . "</li>\n";
    	}
    	else {
    		$output .= "<li>" . $val . "</li>\n";
    	}
    }
    $output .= "</ul>\n";
    return $output;
}

$html = GenerateMenu($menu);

?>

Edit:

Thanks Gumbo and Topbit, now that I'm on my machine with PHP installed, I have tested it and it works fine.

share|improve this answer
    
replacing +'s with the string concatenation '.' does make it work. –  Alister Bulman Apr 15 '09 at 22:15
    
You’re generating invalid HTML. The nested <ul> needs to be inside a <li>. –  Gumbo Apr 15 '09 at 22:15
    
PHP string concatenation is . not +. And yes, a function should imo generally not output any data directly. –  OIS Apr 15 '09 at 22:17

I think this outputs the correct HTML structure.

function GenerateMenu($arr)
{
foreach($arr as $val) {
	if (next($arr)) { $nextitem = current($arr); }
	if (is_array($val)) {
		$output .= "\n<ul>\n" . GenerateMenu($val, $output) . "</ul>\n</li>\n\n";
	}
	elseif (is_array($nextitem)) { $output .= "<li>" . $val; }
	else { $output .= "<li>" . $val . "</li>\n"; }
}
return $output;
}
$html = GenerateMenu($menu);
echo("<ul>\n" . $html . '</ul>');

Same test code as above:

$menu = array('Projects (Menu Level 1)',
          array('Project 1 (Menu Level 2)',
                'Project 2 (Menu Level 2)',
                'Project 3 (Menu Level 2)'),
          'News (Menu Level 1)',
          'Contact (Menu Level 1)');
share|improve this answer

I wrote this utilizing the PHP DOMDocument class. It will create your list as long and as deep as the list you give it using one simple and easy to follow loop. If you want it organized, just ask your database for the list sorted by title (or whatever) first. It assumes your query object data is contained in $menu_categories and it at least has properties of ->id ->parent_id & ->title (change to your needs)

$dom = new DOMDocument();
$dom->validateOnParse = true;
$dom->loadHTML("<html>");


$root = $dom->createElement('ul');
$root->setAttribute('class', 'menu');
$dom->appendChild($root);


foreach($menu_categories as $count => $category){
    $pid = $category->parent_id;
    $parent = $dom->getElementById('simple-li-'.$pid);

    if($parent != null){

        $ul = $dom->getElementById('simple-ul-'.$pid);

        if($ul == null){
            $ul = $dom->createElement('ul');
            $ul->setAttribute('id', 'simple-ul-'.$pid);
            $parent->appendChild($ul);
        }
        $target = $ul;

    }else{ 
        $target = $root;
    }   

    $li = $dom->createElement('li', $category->title);
    $li->setAttribute('id', 'simple-li-'.$category->id);
    $target->appendChild($li);
}

echo $dom->saveHTML($root);
return;

Here's the commented version...

/**
 * This is pure and simple PHP!
 * @author Jamin Szczesny - Mar 2014
 * Assuming you have a returned query list of related rows named... 
 *  $menu_categories (the list can be in any order)
 * and it has valid attributes of.. 
 * ->id (category id)
 * ->title  (category title\name)
 * ->parent_id (categories parent)
 * 
 */

$dom = new DOMDocument();//create a document
$dom->validateOnParse = true;//this is a must
$dom->loadHTML("<html>");//you must load some valid html

//add a root list to the dom
$root = $dom->createElement('ul');
$root->setAttribute('class', 'menu');
$dom->appendChild($root);

//loop through all of your category rows
foreach($menu_categories as $count => $category){
    $pid = $category->parent_id;
    $parent = $dom->getElementById('simple-li-'.$pid);

    //see if we found a parent
    if($parent != null){ //parent found...
        //look for a ul within the parent
        $ul = $dom->getElementById('simple-ul-'.$pid);

        //check to see if that ul exists
        if($ul == null){//ul not created yet so create one
            $ul = $dom->createElement('ul');
            $ul->setAttribute('id', 'simple-ul-'.$pid);
            $parent->appendChild($ul);
        }
        $target = $ul;

    }else{ //no parent found...
        $target = $root;
    }   
    //create this list item
    $li = $dom->createElement('li', $category->title);
    $li->setAttribute('id', 'simple-li-'.$category->id);
    $target->appendChild($li);
}
//output only the html from our list
echo $dom->saveHTML($root);
return;
share|improve this answer

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