Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

There are two numeric columns in a data file. I need to calculate the average of the second column by intervals (such as 100) of the first column.

I can program this task in R, but my R code is really slow for a relatively large data file (millions of rows, with the value of first column changing between 1 to 33132539).

Here I show my R code. How could I tune it to be faster? Other solutions that are perl, python, awk or shell based are appreciated.

Thanks in advance.

(1) my data file (tab-delimited, millions of rows)

5380    30.07383\n
5390    30.87\n
5393    0.07383\n
5404    6\n
5428    30.07383\n
5437    1\n
5440    9\n
5443    30.07383\n
5459    6\n
5463    30.07383\n
5480    7\n
5521    30.07383\n
5538    0\n
5584    20\n
5673    30.07383\n
5720    30.07383\n
5841    3\n
5880    30.07383\n
5913    4\n
5958    30.07383\n

(2) what I want to get, here interval = 100

intervals_of_first_columns, average_of_2nd column_by_the_interval
100, 0\n
200, 0\n
300, 20.34074\n
400, 14.90325\n
.....

(3) R code

chr1 <- 33132539 # set the limit for the interval
window <- 100 # set the size of interval

spe <- read.table("my_data_file", header=F) # read my data in
names(spe) <- c("pos", "rho") # name my data 

interval.chr1 <- data.frame(pos=seq(0, chr1, window)) # setup intervals
meanrho.chr1 <- NULL # object for the mean I want to get

# real calculation, really slow on my own data.
for(i in 1:nrow(interval.chr1)){
  count.sub<-subset(spe, chrom==1 & pos>=interval.chr1$pos[i] & pos<=interval.chr1$pos[i+1])
  meanrho.chr1[i]<-mean(count.sub$rho)
}
share|improve this question
3  
Please define "intervals (such as 100) of the first column". It's not clear what "100" means. It's not the first 100 rows. So perhaps you mean rows that have a value 100 from the initial value (5380 to 5480). Whatever the definition of "intervals of the first column" is, it helps a great deal to write down that definition in words. Not everyone reads R. –  S.Lott Sep 24 '11 at 11:21
2  
Agree with S.Lott. I don't know R, and I don't see a relationship between the given input and given output. Is that the output you expect from that input? –  Bill Ruppert Sep 24 '11 at 11:45
    
this is a numerical interval, for instance, all the values in 1st column >= 1 and <= 100, should be the interval 1 to 100; while the values >=101 and 200 should be the interval 101 to 200, and then on. And, all the values in 2nd column in rows which classified to different intervals defined by the 1st column, should be averaged. I want these averages corresponding to such intervals. Thanks to S. Lott, and Bill Ruppert for your reply. –  jianfeng.mao Sep 24 '11 at 13:19
    
Changing meanrho.chr1 <- NULL to meanrho.chr1 <- numeric(nrow(interval.chr1)) should speed up significantly. It is called pre-allocation. –  Marek Sep 24 '11 at 21:22
add comment

7 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You don't really need to set up an output data.frame but you can if you want. Here is how I would have coded it, and I guarantee it will be fast.

> dat$incrmt <- dat$V1 %/% 100
> dat
     V1       V2 incrmt
1  5380 30.07383     53
2  5390 30.87000     53
3  5393  0.07383     53
4  5404  6.00000     54
5  5428 30.07383     54
6  5437  1.00000     54
7  5440  9.00000     54
8  5443 30.07383     54
9  5459  6.00000     54
10 5463 30.07383     54
11 5480  7.00000     54
12 5521 30.07383     55
13 5538  0.00000     55
14 5584 20.00000     55
15 5673 30.07383     56
16 5720 30.07383     57
17 5841  3.00000     58
18 5880 30.07383     58
19 5913  4.00000     59
20 5958 30.07383     59

> with(dat, tapply(V2, incrmt, mean, na.rm=TRUE))
      53       54       55       56       57       58       59 
20.33922 14.90269 16.69128 30.07383 30.07383 16.53692 17.03692 

You could have done even less setup (skip the incrmt variable with this code:

    > with(dat, tapply(V2, V1 %/% 100, mean, na.rm=TRUE))
      53       54       55       56       57       58       59 
20.33922 14.90269 16.69128 30.07383 30.07383 16.53692 17.03692 

And if you want the result to be available for something:

by100MeanV2 <- with(dat, tapply(V2, V1 %/% 100, mean, na.rm=TRUE))
share|improve this answer
add comment
use strict;
use warnings;

my $BIN_SIZE = 100;
my %freq;

while (<>){
    my ($k, $v) = split;
    my $bin = $BIN_SIZE * int($k / $BIN_SIZE);
    $freq{$bin}{n} ++;
    $freq{$bin}{sum} += $v;
}

for my $bin (sort { $a <=> $b  } keys %freq){
    my ($n, $sum) = map $freq{$bin}{$_}, qw(n sum);
    print join("\t", $bin, $n, $sum, $sum / $n), "\n";
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Given the size of your problem, you need to use data.table which is lightening fast.

require(data.table)
N = 10^6; M = 33132539
mydt = data.table(V1 = runif(N, 1, M), V2 = rpois(N, lambda = 10))
ans  = mydt[,list(avg_V2 = mean(V2)),'V1 %/% 100']

This took 20 seconds on my Macbook Pro with specs 2.53Ghz 4GB RAM. If you don't have any NA in your second column, you can obtain a 10x speedup by replacing mean with .Internal(mean).

Here is the speed comparison using rbenchmark and 5 replications. Note that data.table with .Internal(mean) is 10x faster.

test        replications   elapsed   relative 
f_dt()            5         113.752   10.30736   
f_tapply()        5         147.664   13.38021   
f_dt_internal()   5          11.036    1.00000  

Update from Matthew :

New in v1.8.2, this optimization (replacing mean with .Internal(mean)) is now automatically made; i.e., regular DT[,mean(somecol),by=] now runs at the 10x faster speed. We'll try and make more convenience changes like this in future, so that users don't need to know as many tricks in order to get the best from data.table.

share|improve this answer
    
Dear Ramnath, thanks for your introduction of data.table to me. It is valuable. –  jianfeng.mao Sep 25 '11 at 9:31
add comment

Based on your code, I would guess that this would work the full data set (depending on your system's memory):

chr1 <- 33132539 
window <- 100 

pos <- cut(1:chr1, seq(0, chr1, window))

meanrho.chr1 <- tapply(spe$rho, INDEX = pos, FUN = mean)

I think you want a factor that defines groups of intervals for every 100 within the first column (rho), and then you can use the standard apply family of functions to get means within groups.

Here is the data you posted in reproducible form.

spe <- structure(list(pos = c(5380L, 5390L, 5393L, 5404L, 5428L, 5437L, 
5440L, 5443L, 5459L, 5463L, 5480L, 5521L, 5538L, 5584L, 5673L, 
5720L, 5841L, 5880L, 5913L, 5958L), rho = c(30.07383, 30.87, 0.07383, 
6, 30.07383, 1, 9, 30.07383, 6, 30.07383, 7, 30.07383, 0, 20, 
30.07383, 30.07383, 3, 30.07383, 4, 30.07383)), .Names = c("pos", 
"rho"), row.names = c(NA, -20L), class = "data.frame")

Define the intervals with cut, we just want every 100th value (but you might want the details tweaked as per your code for your real data set).

pos.index <- cut(spe$pos, seq(0, max(spe$pos), by = 100))

Now pass the desired function (mean) over each group.

tapply(spe$rho, INDEX = pos.index, FUN = mean)

(Lots of NAs since we didn't start at 0, then)

(5.2e+03,5.3e+03] (5.3e+03,5.4e+03] (5.4e+03,5.5e+03] (5.5e+03,5.6e+03] (5.6e+03,5.7e+03] (5.7e+03,5.8e+03] (5.8e+03,5.9e+03] 
   20.33922          14.90269          16.69128          30.07383          30.07383          16.53692 

(Add other arguments to FUN, such as na.rm as necessary, e.g:)

## tapply(spe$rho, INDEX = pos.index, FUN = mean, na.rm = TRUE)

See ?tapply applying over groups in a vector (ragged array), and ?cut for ways to generate grouping factors.

share|improve this answer
    
Dear mdsumner, thanks a lot for your kind explanation. I learned much from you code, like cut(). –  jianfeng.mao Sep 25 '11 at 9:37
add comment

Here is a Perl program that does what I think you want. It assumes the rows are sorted by the first column.

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;

my $input_name       = "t.dat";
my $output_name      = "t_out.dat";
my $initial_interval = 1;

my $interval_size    = 100;
my $start_interval   = $initial_interval;
my $end_interval     = $start_interval + $interval_size;

my $interval_total   = 0;
my $interval_count   = 0;

open my $DATA, "<", $input_name  or die "$input_name: $!";
open my $AVGS, ">", $output_name or die "$output_name: $!";

my $rows_in  = 0;
my $rows_out = 0;
$| = 1;

for (<$DATA>) {
    $rows_in++;

    # progress indicator, nice for big data
    print "*" unless $rows_in % 1000;
    print "\n" unless $rows_in % 50000;

    my ($key, $value) = split /\t/;

    # handle possible missing intervals
    while ($key >= $end_interval) {

        # put your value for an empty interval here...
        my $interval_avg = "empty";

        if ($interval_count) {
            $interval_avg = $interval_total/$interval_count;
        }
        print $AVGS $start_interval,"\t", $interval_avg, "\n";
        $rows_out++;

        $interval_count = 0;
        $interval_total = 0;

        $start_interval = $end_interval;
        $end_interval   += $interval_size;
    }

    $interval_count++;
    $interval_total += $value;
}

# handle the last interval
if ($interval_count) {
    my $interval_avg = $interval_total/$interval_count;
    print $AVGS $start_interval,"\t", $interval_avg, "\n";
    $rows_out++;
}

print "\n";
print "Rows in:  $rows_in\n";
print "Rows out: $rows_out\n";

exit 0;
share|improve this answer
    
Dear Bill, thanks a lot. –  jianfeng.mao Sep 25 '11 at 9:34
add comment

The first thing that comes in mind is a python generator, which is memory efficient.

def cat(data_file): # cat generator
    f = open(data_file, "r")
    for line in f:
        yield line

Then put some logic in another function (and supposing that you save the results in a file)

def foo(data_file, output_file):
    f = open(output_file, "w")
    cnt = 0
    suma = 0
    for line in cat(data_file):
        suma += line.split()[-1]
        cnt += 1
        if cnt%100 == 0:
            f.write("%s\t%s\n" %( cnt, suma/100.0)
            suma = 0
    f.close()

EDIT : The above solution assumed that the numbers in the first column are ALL numbers from 1 to N. As your case does not follow this pattern ( from the extra details in the comments), here is the correct function:

def foo_for_your_case(data_file, output_file):
    f = open(output_file, "w")
    interval = 100
    suma = 0.0
    cnt = 0 # keep track of number of elements in the interval

    for line in cat(data_file):
        spl = line.split()

        while int(spl[0]) > interval:
            if cnt > 0 : f.write("%s\t%s\n" %( interval, suma/cnt)
            else: f.write("%s\t0\n" %( interval )
            interval += 100   
            suma = 0.0
            cnt = 0

        suma += float(spl[-1])
        cnt += 1

    f.close()
share|improve this answer
    
Dear hzmloth, thanks a lot for your python solution to my problem. That is instructive to me. –  jianfeng.mao Sep 25 '11 at 9:33
add comment

Oneliner in Perl is simple and efficient as usual:

perl -F\\t -lane'BEGIN{$l=33132539;$i=100;$,=", "}sub p(){print$r*$i,$s/$n if$n;$r=int($F[0]/$i);$s=$n=0}last if$F[0]>$l;p if int($F[0]/$i)!=$r;$s+=$F[1];$n++}{p'
share|improve this answer
    
Dear Hynek, thanks a lot for your help. –  jianfeng.mao Sep 25 '11 at 9:38
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.