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I need reflections on my implementations of the C++11 variadic versions of std::min, std::max. Here are my two alternatives for std::min, where std::max is implemented analogously by just replacing std::min with std::max:

/*! Multi-Type Minimum of \p a. */
template <LessThanComparable T> const T & multi_type_min (const T & a) { return a; } // template termination
/*! Multi-Type Minimum of \p a and \p args. */
template <class T, class ... R >
//requires SameType <T , Args >...
T multi_type_min(const T & a, const R &... b)
{
    return std::min(a, multi_type_min(b...));
}

/*! Minimum of \p a. */
template <LessThanComparable T> const T & common_type_min(const T & a) { return a; } // template termination
/*! Minimum of \p a and \p args. */
template <class T, class ... R, class C = typename boost::common_type<T, R...>::type >
C common_type_min(const T & a, const R &... b)
{
    return std::min(static_cast<C>(a), static_cast<C>(common_type_min(b...)));
}

The key question is if we need common_type_min at all? Note that this allows min() to be called with one arguments. Could this cause confusions or problems?

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Can't you recurse until you get 2 parameters? There's no requirement to stop specifically at 1 parameter. –  André Caron Sep 24 '11 at 15:18
    
I know how do just that. I just wondered if it is better to allow min and max to take one parameter aswell for the sake of algorithm generality on container wrappers such as std::tuple. –  Nordlöw Sep 24 '11 at 15:24
    
I would tend to say that the min of a single value doesn't make sense, yet the min of a 1-element tuple does make sense. Maybe it would be better to overload min() for container types. –  André Caron Sep 24 '11 at 15:27
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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Can't you just write it such that it recurses until you stop at two parameters?

Here's a (untested) snippet:

/*! Multi-Type Minimum of \p a and \p args. */
template <class T, class U >
//requires SameType <T , U >...
T multi_type_min(const T & a, const U & b)
{
    return std::min(a, b);
}

/*! Multi-Type Minimum of \p a and \p args. */
template <class T, class U, class ... R >
//requires SameType <T , U, Args >...
T multi_type_min(const T & a, const U & b, const R &... c)
{
    return std::min(a, multi_type_min(b, c...));
}

I'm guessing the common_type_min variant is necessary when there are multiple common types. Consider comparing short and long values. Because of type promotion, the short will be converted to long for comparison. However, some application constraint or invariant might let you know that both values can be represented by a short. In this case, you may want to have common_type_min<short>(a,b).

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Be aware of that this version of multi_type_min is right associative. Shouldn't we prefer left instead? –  Nordlöw Sep 24 '11 at 15:48
    
@Nordlöw: seems to me like an arbitrary decision. Why should all comparisons be performed in the type of the left operand? Shouldn't std::min(1, 1.0) return a double? If so, shouldn't multi_type_min(1, 1, 1, 1, 1.0) also return a double? –  André Caron Sep 24 '11 at 16:19
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