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User kokos answered the wonderful Hidden Features of C# question by mentioning the using keyword. Can you elaborate on that? What are good uses of using?

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It's a C# way of supporting the RAII idiom: hackcraft.net/raii –  Nemanja Trifunovic Sep 16 '08 at 18:35
    
You can use for objects those have implemented IDispose interface. Using will call Dispose method when that object goes out of scope. It guarantees to call Dispose even if any exception occurs. It works like a finally clause and execute Dispose. –  CharithJ 2 days ago

24 Answers 24

up vote 193 down vote accepted

The reason for the "using" statement is to ensure that the object is disposed as soon as it goes out of scope, and it doesn't require explicit code to ensure that this happens.

As per http://www.codeproject.com/KB/cs/tinguusingstatement.aspx, the .NET CLR converts

using (MyResource myRes = new MyResource())
{
    myRes.DoSomething();
}

to

{ // limits scope of myRes
    MyResource myRes= new MyResource();
    try
    {
        myRes.DoSomething();
    }
    finally
    {
        // Check for a null resource.
        if (myRes!= null)
            // Call the object's Dispose method.
            ((IDisposable)myRes).Dispose();
    }
}
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1  
Thanks! I was never completely clear about the 'using' statement. Very helpful! –  Sam Wessel Sep 16 '08 at 20:01
49  
Note that it's not necessarily a matter of the object being disposed correctly, but more of whether it is disposed in a timely manner. Objects implementing IDisposable which hold on to unmanaged resources like streams and file handles will also implement a finalizer that will ensure that Dispose is called during garbage collection. The problem is that GC might not happen for a relatively long time. using makes sure that Dispose is called once you're through with the object. –  John Saunders Jan 11 '12 at 18:53
    
Please note that the generated code is a bit different when MyRessource is a struct. There is obviously no test for nullity, but also no boxing to IDisposable. A constrained virtual call is emitted. –  Romain Verdier May 3 '14 at 14:31

Since a lot of people still don't know that you can do:

using (System.IO.StreamReader r = new System.IO.StreamReader(""))
using (System.IO.StreamReader r2 = new System.IO.StreamReader("")) {
   //code
}

I guess a lot of people still don't know that you can do:

using (System.IO.StreamReader r = new System.IO.StreamReader(""), r2 = new System.IO.StreamReader("")) {
   //code
}
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Is it possible to use multiple objects of different types in a single using statement? –  Agnel Kurian Apr 24 '13 at 12:12
3  
@AgnelKurian No: "error CS1044: Cannot use more than one type in a for, using, fixed, or declaration statement" –  David Sykes Jan 23 '14 at 9:00
    
You are missing a ")" in your first code block at line 2. –  Pluc Apr 27 at 13:36

Things like this:

using (var conn = new SqlConnection("connection string"))
{
   conn.Open();

    // execute sql statement here on the connection you created
}

This SqlConnection will be closed without needing to explicitly call the .Close() function, and this will happen even if an exception is thrown, without the need for a try/catch/finally.

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2  
your final note was great! –  BrOSs Feb 19 '13 at 17:27

using can be used to call IDisposable. It can also be used to alias types.

using (SqlConnection cnn = new SqlConnection()) { /*code*/}
using f1 = System.Windows.Forms.Form;
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using, in the sense of

using (var foo = new Bar())
{
  Baz();
}

Is actually shorthand for a try/finally block. It is equivalent to the code:

var foo = new Bar();
try
{
  Baz();
}
finally
{
  foo.Dispose();
}

You'll note, of course, that the first snippet is much more concise than the second and also that there are many kinds of things that you might want to do as cleanup even if an exception is thrown. Because of this, we've come up with a class that we call Scope that allows you to execute arbitrary code in the Dispose method. So, for example, if you had a property called IsWorking that you always wanted to set to false after trying to perform an operation, you'd do it like this:

using (new Scope(() => IsWorking = false))
{
  IsWorking = true;
  MundaneYetDangerousWork();
}

You can read more about our solution and how we derived it here.

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I've used it a lot in the past to work with input and output streams. You can nest them nicely and it takes away a lot of the potential problems you usually run into (by automatically calling dispose). For example:

        using (FileStream fs = new FileStream("c:\file.txt", FileMode.Open))
        {
            using (BufferedStream bs = new BufferedStream(fs))
            {
                using (System.IO.StreamReader sr = new StreamReader(bs))
                {
                    string output = sr.ReadToEnd();
                }
            }
        }
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Interestingly, you can also use the using/IDisposable pattern for other interesting things (such as the other point of the way that Rhino Mocks uses it). Basically, you can take advantage of the fact that the compiler will always call .Dispose on the "used" object. If you have something that needs to happen after a certain operation ... something that has a definite start and end ... then you can simply make an IDisposable class that starts the operation in the constructor, and then finishes in the Dispose method.

This allows you to use the really nice using syntax to denote the explicit start and end of said operation. This is also how the System.Transactions stuff works.

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When using ADO.NET you can use the keywork for things like your connection object or reader object. That way when the code block completes it will automatically dispose of your connection.

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1  
I would just add that the code block doesn't even have to complete. A using block will dispose of the resource even in the event of an unhandled exception. –  harpo Sep 16 '08 at 18:27
    
Just to further clarify, it's a way of making sure the Garbage Collector takes care of your allocations when you want it to, instead of doing it when it wants to. –  moswald Sep 16 '08 at 18:28

"using" can also be used to resolve name space conflicts. See http://www.davidarno.org/c-howtos/aliases-overcoming-name-conflicts/ for a short tutorial I wrote on the subject.

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RhinoMocks makes an intersting use for using.

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its basically the same as calling Playback and Verify all it just does that in the Dispose() methods –  George Mauer Sep 16 '08 at 18:37

In conclusion, when you use a local variable of a type that implements IDisposable, always, without exception, use using1.

If you use nonlocal IDisposable variables, then always implement the IDisposable pattern.

Two simple rules, no exception1. Preventing resource leaks otherwise is a real pain in the *ss.


1): The only exception is – when you're handling exceptions. It might then be less code to call Dispose explicitly in the finally block.

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Another great use of using is when instantiating a modal dialog.

Using frm as new Form1

Form1.ShowDialog

' do stuff here"

End Using"

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public class ClassA:IDisposable

{
   #region IDisposable Members        
    public void Dispose()
    {            
        GC.SuppressFinalize(this);
    }
    #endregion
}

public void fn_Data()

    {
     using (ClassA ObjectName = new ClassA())
            {
                //use objectName 
            }
    }
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using is used when you have a resource that you want disposed after it's been used.

For instance if you allocate a File resource and only need to use it in one section of code for a little reading or writing, using is helpful for disposing of the File resource as soon as your done.

The resource being used needs to implement IDisposable to work properly.

Example:

using (File file = new File (parameters))
{
    *code to do stuff with the file*
}
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The using keyword defines the scope for the object and then disposes of the object when the scope is complete. For example.

using (Font font2 = new Font("Arial", 10.0f))
{
    // use font2
}

See here for the MSDN article on the C# using keyword.

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Not that it is ultra important, but using can also be used to change resources on the fly. Yes disposable as mentioned earlier, but perhaps specifically you don't want the resources they mismatch with other resources during the rest of your execution. So you want to dispose of it so it doesn't interfere elsewhere.

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Thanks to the comments below, I will clean this post up a bit (I shouldn't have used the words 'garbage collection' at the time, apologies):
When you use using, it will call the Dispose() method on the object at the end of the using's scope. So you can have quite a bit of great cleanup code in your Dispose() method.
A bullet point here which will hopefully maybe get this un-markeddown: If you implement IDisposable, make sure you call GC.SuppressFinalize() in your Dispose() implementation, as otherwise automatic garbage collection will try to come along and Finalize it at some point, which at the least would be a waste of resources if you've already Dispose()d of it.

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It has no effect on the GC. –  Jason Diller Sep 16 '08 at 18:29
    
It has an indirect effect. Because you've disposed of the object explicitly, it does not require finalization and can therefore be GC'd earlier. –  Kent Boogaart Sep 16 '08 at 18:38

Another example of a reasonable use in which the object is immediately disposed:

using (IDataReader myReader = DataFunctions.ExecuteReader(CommandType.Text, sql.ToString(), dp.Parameters, myConnectionString)) 
{
    while (myReader.Read()) 
    {
        MyObject theObject = new MyObject();
        theObject.PublicProperty = myReader.GetString(0);
        myCollection.Add(theObject);
    }
}
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Everything outside the curly brackets is disposed, so it is great to dispose your objects if you are not using them. This is so because if you have a SqlDataAdapter object and you are using it only once in the application life cycle and you are filling just one dataset and you don't need it anymore, you can use the code:

using(SqlDataAdapter adapter_object = new SqlDataAdapter(sql_command_parameter))
{
   // do stuff
} // here adapter_object is disposed automatically
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You can make use of the alias namespace by way of the following example:

using LegacyEntities = CompanyFoo.CoreLib.x86.VBComponents.CompanyObjects;

This is called a using alias directive as as you can see, it can be used to hide long-winded references should you want to make it obvious in your code what you are referring to e.g.

LegacyEntities.Account

instead of

CompanyFoo.CoreLib.x86.VBComponents.CompanyObjects.Account

or simply

Account   // It is not obvious this is a legacy entity
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The using statement provides a convenience mechanism to correctly use IDisposable objects. As a rule, when you use an IDisposable object, you should declare and instantiate it in a using statement. The using statement calls the Dispose method on the object in the correct way, and (when you use it as shown earlier) it also causes the object itself to go out of scope as soon as Dispose is called. Within the using block, the object is read-only and cannot be modified or reassigned.

This comes from: here

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For me the name "using" is a little bit confusing, because is can be a directive to import a Namespace or a statement (like the one discussed here) for error handling.

A different name for error handling would've been nice, and maybe a somehow more obvious one.

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Just adding a little something that I was surprised did not come up. The most interesting feature of using (in my opinion) is that no mater how you exit the using block, it will always dispose the object. This includes returns and exceptions.

using (var db = new DbContext())
{
    if(db.State == State.Closed) throw new Exception("Database connection is closed.");
    return db.Something.ToList();
}

It doesn't matter if the exception is thrown or the list is returned. The DbContext object will always be disposed.

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Using Clause is used to define the scope for the particular variable. For example:

     Using(SqlConnection conn=new SqlConnection(ConnectionString)
            {
                Conn.Open()
            // Execute sql statements here.
           // You do not have to close the connection explicitly here as "USING" will close the connection once the object Conn becomes out of the defined scope.
            }
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protected by CharithJ 2 days ago

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