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Say you had this DTO class:

public class MyObj{
 private int id;

 private String displayName;
 private String backendData;

 public boolean equals(Object obj){
  return id.equals(obj);
 }

 private int hashCode(){
  return id.hashCode();
 }
}

Lets say a user got to pick several instances of MyObj from a list that only showed the displayName and the id# is associated in the background. To save bandwidth, you don't send backendData. When they submit their selection back to you, the client just sends you the id#.

Now, you've maintained the list of original options server side in a Collection<MyObj>. The naive approach to geting the "full" object back from the collection would be to iterate through the Collection and call ".equals()" on every object. This scales in O(n) though :(

It seems like with constant time operations collections like HashSet, I should be able to retrieve an object in constant time, if I know it's identity. But HashSet only has a "contains()" method and doesn't return the object it found.

Any advice? As always, thanks a bunch stackOverFlow!

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4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I assume id is unique across the collection?

You are almost there use a Map<Integer, MyObj> then map.get(id) is asymptotically constant time.

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I hate creating an additional data structure when I already have my Set, but I think you're correct. –  exabrial Sep 24 '11 at 20:17
    
You could use a TreeSet with custom comparator but it won't be as fast as a the map. –  Miserable Variable Sep 24 '11 at 20:40
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hashCode is intended to just get a quick number for an object. equals should do a full comparison of all the fields that you want to verify for object equality.

public class MyObj
{
    private final Integer id;

    private String displayName;
    private String backendData;

    public boolean equals(Object obj)
    {
        final MyObj other;

        if(obj == null || obj.getClass() != MyObj.class)
        {
            return (false);
        }

        other = (MyObj)obj;

        if(!(displayName.equals(other.displayName))
        {
            return (false);
        }

        if(!(backendData.equals(other.backendData))
        {
            return (false);
        }

        return (true);
    }

    private int hashCode()
    {
        return id.hashCode();
    }
}

This assumes none of the fields can be null, it is a bit more complex in the if statements if they can be null.

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That's a broad statement, which is only partially true, because it depends highly on your business scenario. If you were adding items to a Set, and you changed the business key (displayName) AND wanted to maintain uniqueness, you're equals method will cause problems. –  exabrial Sep 24 '11 at 20:21
    
immutable objects are a wonderful thing :-) If you have no state that can change then those issues don't arise. Also if the state changes I would expect that the hashCode would also change, which means you should not be putting an object you plan on mutating in a collection. –  TofuBeer Sep 24 '11 at 23:10
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Your question presents multiple issues IMHO: first off don't use the db id as a hash key, you could get in trouble if that thing is autogenerated. Second hashset/map use hashcode and equals methods to retrieve objects (when u use the getmethod). First the hashcode is used to quickly find the bucket where your object might be. Then if there were collisions in your hash collection and there s multiple objects in the in that bucket then equals will be used to retrive the object. So when u use get with an instance of your class here only the fields that are used in hashcode and equals need to have the correct value in order to retrieve your object. In this case if ur object has the right id (but wrong other field) it could be used to retrieve its counterpart with the otherfield populated. That or u can use a map.

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(a) What sort of trouble can you get in by using an ID as a hash key? I am not aware of any. (b) HashSet does not have a get method. –  Tom Anderson Sep 24 '11 at 16:46
    
A. Look it up on the hibernate site if you dint believe me. B. I was answering the part about how hash is used to retrieve elements of a hashtable-like collection, since it seems to me that there s some unclarity on that. Is my explanation incorrect? –  Shivan Dragon Sep 24 '11 at 17:18
    
(a) I must say i don't believe much of what i read on the Hibernate site! (b) Your explanation of how a hashtable works is quite right. However, since HashSet does not have a get method, those facts don't help solve the problem. You conclude with "That or u can use a map" - which is absolutely right, but doesn't really need the explanation about hashtables! –  Tom Anderson Sep 24 '11 at 18:10
    
a. The question wasn't on weather you agree or not with what the hibernate site sais, the fact remains that if you have some orm framework and configure your beans for id autogeneration (or if for some reason the orm uses internal sequencers to generate your persistable beans' ids') then using that id field in hashcode/equals will get you unpredictable and sometimes plain wrong behaviour from those methods.b. Those facts I say have been written to shed some light on the question of how hash collections work, the fact that java's Set interface doesn't have a get method was not addressed there. –  Shivan Dragon Sep 24 '11 at 18:54
    
(a) No, if you make a claim about something causing trouble, the onus is on you to back it up. Simply saying "look it up" is not backing it up. The description of the problem you have just given is backing it up - thank you. However, it is clear that the problem is only with IDs which are generated after the object is created; the OP's code might not do this (and a DTO would normally not). (b) I noticed that the fact that Set does not have a get method was not addressed; that's why i commented to point it out. It's a problem which makes it impossible to use a HashSet in the way you describe. –  Tom Anderson Sep 24 '11 at 19:51
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You're object doesn't work (because you can't call methods on primitive data types). Change your id into an Integer, and use it in a hashed collection.

Map<Integer, T> objectMap = ...;
Integer id = someidfromfrontend;
T anObj = objectMap.get(id);
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you're correct, but this is stackoverflow, not an IDE. I could have used Integer. –  exabrial Sep 24 '11 at 20:12
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