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I have a well-formed tree that represents a mathematical expression. For example, given the string: "1+2-3*4/5", this gets parsed into:

subtract(add(1,2),divide(multiply(3,4),5))

Which is expressed as this tree:

"1+2-3*4/5"

What I'd like to be able to do is take this tree and reduce it as much as possible. In the case above, this is pretty simple, because all of the numbers are constants. However, things start to get trickier once I allow for unknowns (denoted with a $ followed by an identifier):

"3*$a/$a" becomes divide(multiply(3,$a), $a)

This should simplify to 3, since the $a terms should cancel each other out. The question is, "how do I go about recognizing this in a generic manner?" How do I recognize that min(3, sin($x)) is always going to be sin($x)? How do I recognize that sqrt(pow($a, 2)) is abs($a)? How do I recognize that nthroot(pow(42, $a), $a) (the ath root of 42 to the ath power) is 42?

I realize this question is pretty broad, but I've been beating my head against this for a while and haven't come up with anything satisfactory enough.

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3  
And what about sqrt(pow(-3, 2))? –  Howard Sep 24 '11 at 16:28
1  
@Howard that evaluates to 3, and is an example of why I haven't been able to think of a good answer yet (edited question to reflect that). :) –  Dave DeLong Sep 24 '11 at 16:30
3  
3a/a is not the same as 3 because 3a/a is undefined when a=0. –  Nick Johnson Sep 26 '11 at 3:37
1  
@NickJohnson Interesting hint! Doesn't 3*a/a equal 3 even when a = 0, since lim( a->0|left, 3*a/a ) = 3 and lim( a->0|right, 3*a/a ) = 3? –  SteAp Sep 26 '11 at 15:09
1  
@StefanPantke No, because x/0 is undefined for all x. A function (like this one) can have a point discontinuity, even if the limits are consistent from either direction. –  Nick Johnson Sep 27 '11 at 0:32

6 Answers 6

up vote 41 down vote accepted

You probably want to implement a term rewriting system. Regarding the underlying math, have a look at WikiPedia.

Structure of a term rewrite module

Since I implemented a solution recently...

  • First, prepare a class CExpression, which models the structure of your expression.

  • Implement CRule, which contains a pattern and a replacement. Use special symbols as pattern variables, which need to get bound during pattern matching and replaced in the replacement expression.

  • Then, implement a class CRule. It's main method applyRule(CExpression, CRule) tries to match the rule against any applicable subexpression of expression. In case it matches, return the result.

  • Finaly, implement a class CRuleSet, which is simply a set of CRule objects. The main method reduce(CExpression) applies the set of rules as long as no more rules can be applied and then returns the reduced expression.

  • Additionally, you need a class CBindingEnvironment, which maps already matched symbols to the matched values.

Try to rewrite expression to a normal form

Don't forget, that this approach works to a certain point, but is likely to be non complete. This is due to the fact, that all of the following rules perform local term rewrites.

To make this local rewrite logic stronger, one should try to transform expressions into something I'd call a normal form. This is my approach:

  • If a term contains literal values, try to move the term as far to the right as possible.

  • Eventually, this literal value may appear rightmost and can be evaluated as part of a fully literal expression.

When to evaluate fully literal expression

An interesting question is when to evaluate fully literal expression. Suppose you have an expression

   x * ( 1 / 3 )

which would reduce to

   x * 0.333333333333333333

No suppose x gets replaced by 3. This would yield something like

   0.999999999999999999999999

Thus eager evaluation returns a slightly incorrect value.

At the other side, if you keep ( 1 / 3 ) and first replace x by 3

   3 * ( 1 / 3 )

a rewrite rule would give

   1

Thus, it might be useful to evaluate fully literal expression late.

Examples of rewrite rules

Here is how my rules appear inside the application: The _1, _2, ... symbols match any subexpression:

addRule( new TARuleFromString( '0+_1',   // left hand side  :: pattern
                               '_1'      // right hand side :: replacement
                             ) 
       );

or a bit more complicated

addRule( new TARuleFromString( '_1+_2*_1', 
                               '(1+_2)*_1' 
                             ) 
       );

Certain special symbols only match special subexpressions. E.g. _Literal1, _Literal2, ... match only literal values:

addRule( new TARuleFromString( 'exp(_Literal1) * exp(_Literal2 )', 
                               'exp( _Literal1 + _Literal2 )' 
                             ) 
       );

This rule moves non-literal expression to the left:

addRule( new TARuleFromString( '_Literal*_NonLiteral', 
                               '_NonLiteral*_Literal' 
                             ) 
       );

Any name, that begins with a '_', is a pattern variable. While the system matches a rule, it keeps a stack of assignments of already matched symbols.

Finally, don't forget that rules may yield non terminating replacement sequences. Thus while reducing expression, make the process remember, which intermediate expressions have already been reached before.

In my implementation, I don't save intermediate expressions directly. I keep an array of MD5() hashes of intermediate expression.

A set of rules as a starting point

Here's a set of rules to get started:

            addRule( new TARuleFromString( '0+_1', '_1' ) );
            addRule( new TARuleFromString( '_Literal2=0-_1', '_1=0-_Literal2' ) );
            addRule( new TARuleFromString( '_1+0', '_1' ) );

            addRule( new TARuleFromString( '1*_1', '_1' ) );
            addRule( new TARuleFromString( '_1*1', '_1' ) );

            addRule( new TARuleFromString( '_1+_1', '2*_1' ) );

            addRule( new TARuleFromString( '_1-_1', '0' ) );
            addRule( new TARuleFromString( '_1/_1', '1' ) );

            // Rate = (pow((EndValue / BeginValue), (1 / (EndYear - BeginYear)))-1) * 100 

            addRule( new TARuleFromString( 'exp(_Literal1) * exp(_Literal2 )', 'exp( _Literal1 + _Literal2 )' ) );
            addRule( new TARuleFromString( 'exp( 0 )', '1' ) );

            addRule( new TARuleFromString( 'pow(_Literal1,_1) * pow(_Literal2,_1)', 'pow(_Literal1 * _Literal2,_1)' ) );
            addRule( new TARuleFromString( 'pow( _1, 0 )', '1' ) );
            addRule( new TARuleFromString( 'pow( _1, 1 )', '_1' ) );
            addRule( new TARuleFromString( 'pow( _1, -1 )', '1/_1' ) );
            addRule( new TARuleFromString( 'pow( pow( _1, _Literal1 ), _Literal2 )', 'pow( _1, _Literal1 * _Literal2 )' ) );

//          addRule( new TARuleFromString( 'pow( _Literal1, _1 )', 'ln(_1) / ln(_Literal1)' ) );
            addRule( new TARuleFromString( '_literal1 = pow( _Literal2, _1 )', '_1 = ln(_literal1) / ln(_Literal2)' ) );
            addRule( new TARuleFromString( 'pow( _Literal2, _1 ) = _literal1 ', '_1 = ln(_literal1) / ln(_Literal2)' ) );

            addRule( new TARuleFromString( 'pow( _1, _Literal2 ) = _literal1 ', 'pow( _literal1, 1 / _Literal2 ) = _1' ) );

            addRule( new TARuleFromString( 'pow( 1, _1 )', '1' ) );

            addRule( new TARuleFromString( '_1 * _1 = _literal', '_1 = sqrt( _literal )' ) );

            addRule( new TARuleFromString( 'sqrt( _literal * _1 )', 'sqrt( _literal ) * sqrt( _1 )' ) );

            addRule( new TARuleFromString( 'ln( _Literal1 * _2 )', 'ln( _Literal1 ) + ln( _2 )' ) );
            addRule( new TARuleFromString( 'ln( _1 * _Literal2 )', 'ln( _Literal2 ) + ln( _1 )' ) );
            addRule( new TARuleFromString( 'log2( _Literal1 * _2 )', 'log2( _Literal1 ) + log2( _2 )' ) );
            addRule( new TARuleFromString( 'log2( _1 * _Literal2 )', 'log2( _Literal2 ) + log2( _1 )' ) );
            addRule( new TARuleFromString( 'log10( _Literal1 * _2 )', 'log10( _Literal1 ) + log10( _2 )' ) );
            addRule( new TARuleFromString( 'log10( _1 * _Literal2 )', 'log10( _Literal2 ) + log10( _1 )' ) );

            addRule( new TARuleFromString( 'ln( _Literal1 / _2 )', 'ln( _Literal1 ) - ln( _2 )' ) );
            addRule( new TARuleFromString( 'ln( _1 / _Literal2 )', 'ln( _Literal2 ) - ln( _1 )' ) );
            addRule( new TARuleFromString( 'log2( _Literal1 / _2 )', 'log2( _Literal1 ) - log2( _2 )' ) );
            addRule( new TARuleFromString( 'log2( _1 / _Literal2 )', 'log2( _Literal2 ) - log2( _1 )' ) );
            addRule( new TARuleFromString( 'log10( _Literal1 / _2 )', 'log10( _Literal1 ) - log10( _2 )' ) );
            addRule( new TARuleFromString( 'log10( _1 / _Literal2 )', 'log10( _Literal2 ) - log10( _1 )' ) );


            addRule( new TARuleFromString( '_Literal1 = _NonLiteral + _Literal2', '_Literal1 - _Literal2 = _NonLiteral' ) );
            addRule( new TARuleFromString( '_Literal1 = _NonLiteral * _Literal2', '_Literal1 / _Literal2 = _NonLiteral' ) );
            addRule( new TARuleFromString( '_Literal1 = _NonLiteral / _Literal2', '_Literal1 * _Literal2 = _NonLiteral' ) );
            addRule( new TARuleFromString( '_Literal1 =_NonLiteral - _Literal2',  '_Literal1 + _Literal2 = _NonLiteral' ) );

            addRule( new TARuleFromString( '_NonLiteral + _Literal2 = _Literal1 ', '_Literal1 - _Literal2 = _NonLiteral' ) );
            addRule( new TARuleFromString( '_NonLiteral * _Literal2 = _Literal1 ', '_Literal1 / _Literal2 = _NonLiteral' ) );
            addRule( new TARuleFromString( '_NonLiteral / _Literal2 = _Literal1 ', '_Literal1 * _Literal2 = _NonLiteral' ) );
            addRule( new TARuleFromString( '_NonLiteral - _Literal2 = _Literal1',  '_Literal1 + _Literal2 = _NonLiteral' ) );

            addRule( new TARuleFromString( '_NonLiteral - _Literal2 = _Literal1 ', '_Literal1 + _Literal2 = _NonLiteral' ) );
            addRule( new TARuleFromString( '_Literal2 - _NonLiteral = _Literal1 ', '_Literal2 - _Literal1 = _NonLiteral' ) );

            addRule( new TARuleFromString( '_Literal1 = sin( _NonLiteral )', 'asin( _Literal1 ) = _NonLiteral' ) );
            addRule( new TARuleFromString( '_Literal1 = cos( _NonLiteral )', 'acos( _Literal1 ) = _NonLiteral' ) );
            addRule( new TARuleFromString( '_Literal1 = tan( _NonLiteral )', 'atan( _Literal1 ) = _NonLiteral' ) );

            addRule( new TARuleFromString( '_Literal1 = ln( _1 )', 'exp( _Literal1 ) = _1' ) );
            addRule( new TARuleFromString( 'ln( _1 ) = _Literal1', 'exp( _Literal1 ) = _1' ) );

            addRule( new TARuleFromString( '_Literal1 = _NonLiteral', '_NonLiteral = _Literal1' ) );

            addRule( new TARuleFromString( '( _Literal1 / _2 ) = _Literal2', '_Literal1 / _Literal2 = _2 ' ) );

            addRule( new TARuleFromString( '_Literal*_NonLiteral', '_NonLiteral*_Literal' ) );
            addRule( new TARuleFromString( '_Literal+_NonLiteral', '_NonLiteral+_Literal' ) );

            addRule( new TARuleFromString( '_Literal1+(_Literal2+_NonLiteral)', '_NonLiteral+(_Literal1+_Literal2)' ) );
            addRule( new TARuleFromString( '_Literal1+(_Literal2+_1)', '_1+(_Literal1+_Literal2)' ) );

            addRule( new TARuleFromString( '(_1*_2)+(_3*_2)', '(_1+_3)*_2' ) );
            addRule( new TARuleFromString( '(_2*_1)+(_2*_3)', '(_1+_3)*_2' ) );

            addRule( new TARuleFromString( '(_2*_1)+(_3*_2)', '(_1+_3)*_2' ) );
            addRule( new TARuleFromString( '(_1*_2)+(_2*_3)', '(_1+_3)*_2' ) );

            addRule( new TARuleFromString( '(_Literal * _1 ) / _Literal', '_1' ) );
            addRule( new TARuleFromString( '(_Literal1 * _1 ) / _Literal2', '(_Literal1 * _Literal2 ) / _1' ) );

            addRule( new TARuleFromString( '(_1+_2)+_3', '_1+(_2+_3)' ) );
            addRule( new TARuleFromString( '(_1*_2)*_3', '_1*(_2*_3)' ) );

            addRule( new TARuleFromString( '_1+(_1+_2)', '(2*_1)+_2' ) );

            addRule( new TARuleFromString( '_1+_2*_1', '(1+_2)*_1' ) );

            addRule( new TARuleFromString( '_literal1 * _NonLiteral = _literal2', '_literal2 / _literal1 = _NonLiteral' ) );
            addRule( new TARuleFromString( '_literal1 + _NonLiteral = _literal2', '_literal2 - _literal1 = _NonLiteral' ) );
            addRule( new TARuleFromString( '_literal1 - _NonLiteral = _literal2', '_literal1 - _literal2 = _NonLiteral' ) );
            addRule( new TARuleFromString( '_literal1 / _NonLiteral = _literal2', '_literal1 * _literal2 = _NonLiteral' ) );

Make rules first-class expressions

An interesting point: Since the above rules are special expression, which get correctly evaluate by the expression parser, users can even add new rules and thus enhance the application's rewrite capabilities.

Parsing expressions (or more general: languages)

For Cocoa/OBjC applications, Dave DeLong's DDMathParser is a perfect candidate to syntactically analyse mathematical expressions.

For other languages, our old friends Lex & Yacc or the newer GNU Bison might be of help.

Far younger and with an enourmous set of ready to use syntax-files, ANTLR is a modern parser generator based on Java. Besides purely command-line use, ANTLRWorks provides a GUI frontend to construct and debug ANTLR based parsers. ANTLR generates grammars for various host language, like JAVA, C, Python, PHP or C#. The ActionScript runtime is currently broken.

In case you'd like to learn how to parse expressions (or languages in general) from the bottom-up, I'd propose this free book's text from Niklaus Wirth (or the german book edition), the famous inventor of Pascal and Modula-2.

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2  
+1 this is REALLY fascinating and is by far the most promising approach. –  Dave DeLong Sep 25 '11 at 1:35
    
A lot of the rules you've provided are unnecessary, since I don't deal with the = operator, but this is giving me lots of ideas. I'll mark this as correct unless something better arises. –  Dave DeLong Sep 25 '11 at 1:57
    
True! I simply copied all the Flex code. BTW: My solution aims to solve equation systems. User set certain symbols to values and the app compute all remaining ones or proves the system as inconsistent. –  SteAp Sep 25 '11 at 14:13

This task can become quite complicated (besides the simplest transformation). Essentially this is what algebra software does all the time.

You can find a readable introduction how this is done (rule-based evaluation) e.g. for Mathematica.

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1  
+1 thank you for the links –  Dave DeLong Sep 24 '11 at 16:36
1  
Definitely, one would use CAS software to simplify terms. But in case one needs to implement term rewriting into an application, a standard CAS isn't the way to go, since most aren't embeddable. –  SteAp Mar 23 '12 at 23:35

You're wanting to build a CAS (compute algebra system) and the topic is so wide that there is an entire field of study dedicated to it. Which means there are a few books that will probably answer your question better than SO.

I know some systems build trees that reduce constants first and then put the tree into a normalized form and then use a large database of proven/known formulas to transform the problem into some other form.

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functions.wolfram.com is amazing! Thank you! –  Dave DeLong Sep 24 '11 at 16:56

I believe you have to "brute force" such trees.

You will have to formulate a couple of rules that describe possible simplifications. Then you habe to walk through the tree and search for applicable rules. Since some simplifications might lead to simpler results than others you will have to do a similar thing that you do for finding the shortest route on a subway plan: try out all possibilities and sort the results by some quality criteria.

Since the number of such scenarios is finite you might be able to discover the simplification rules automatically by trying out all combinations of operators and variables and again have a genetic algorithm that verifies that the rule has not been found before and that it actually simplifies the input.

Multiplications can be represented as additions, so one rule might be that a - a cancels itself out: 2a-a = a+a-a

Another rule would be to first multiply out all divisions because those are fractions. Example:

1/2 + 3/4 Discover all the divisions and then multiply each fraction with the divisor on both sides of all other fractions

4/8 + 6/8 Then all elements have the same divisor and so can the unified to (4+6)/8 = 10/8

Finally you find the highest common divisor between top and bottom 5/4

Applied to your tree the strategy would be to work from the bottom leaves upwards simplifying each multiplication first by converting it to additions. Then simplifying each addition like the fractions

All the while you would check agains your shortcut rules to discover such simplifcations. To know that a rule applies you probably have to either try out all permutations of a subtree. E.g. The a-a rule would also apply for -a+a. There might be a a+b-a.

Just some thoughts, hope that gives you some ideas...

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You actually can't in general do this because, although they are the same mathematically, the may not be the same in computer arithmetic. For instance, -MAX_INT is undefined, so --%a =/= %a. Similarly for floats, you have to deal with NaN and Inf appropriately.

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1  
Assuming 2's complement, -MAX_INT is MIN_INT+1 but -MIN_INT is MIN_INT. So yes, --a = a, but not always in a nice way (ie there is an a such that -a=a even though a!=0) –  harold Sep 24 '11 at 17:28

My naive approach would be to have some sort of data structure with inverses of each function (i.e. divide and multiply). You would obviously need further logic to make sure they are actually inverse since multiplying by 3 and then dividing by 4 is not actually an inverse.

Although this is primitive, I think it's a decent first pass at the problem and would solve a lot of the cases you noted in your question.

I do look forward to seeing your full solution and staring in awe at is mathematical brilliance :)

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