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Please help solve this:

Telephone numbers are often given out as a word representation, so that they are easy to remember. For example if my number is 4357, the text given is HELP. There could be many other possibilities with the same digits, most of which do not make sense.

Write a space-and-time-optimal function that can, given a phone number, print the possible words that can be formed from it.

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closed as not a real question by Howard, Vladimir, Michael Petrotta, Brian Roach, Jim Lewis Sep 24 '11 at 18:19

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
What is the question? Why should we write this function? –  Howard Sep 24 '11 at 18:09
    
I am looking for suggestions (algorithm) to approach the problem, if not the exact solution. –  Saket Sep 24 '11 at 18:10
    
Words means 'meaningful' words or any combination of characters? –  SpeedBirdNine Sep 24 '11 at 18:12
    
any combination –  Saket Sep 24 '11 at 18:14
2  
You seem to be confusing "help solve" and "Do this for me". What have you tried? –  Brian Roach Sep 24 '11 at 18:19

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Based on the detailed explanation in the comment this should be a simple permutation combination problem: Each digit will have a number of characters associated to it (example 4 could mean either of G,H or I) and then for a combination of digits the permutation can be computed.

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appreciate your response, as opposed to the votes to 'close'. this is the extent (provide hints) i expect folks to answer, if they wish to. Of course, more details are always welcome! –  Saket Sep 24 '11 at 18:28

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