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This is my calling code from PHP currently:

$getfromdb = "SELECT `myTable`.* FROM `myTable` WHERE `status`=1 and ORDER BY rand() LIMIT 4";

This is sufficient enough for now, as the number of rows in the table is pretty small (<1000). However,

(a) the randomness is not enough (meaning some of the same rows are being returned pretty often), and

(b) the size of the table will increase very quickly, meaning performance will take a hit.

How could I make this such that the code could be more random and efficient?

There is an autoincrement on the primary key (id) - but there are holes as well.

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1  
You could create random numbers in PHP and select where ID equals that random number. –  Rusty Fausak Sep 24 '11 at 18:13

2 Answers 2

If you know the table's approximated cardinality, I think you can set OFFSETrandomly. For example:

$cardinality = 100000;
$limit = 4;
$offset = rand(0, $cardinality - $limit);
$getfromdb = "
    SELECT * FROM (
        SELECT `myTable`.* FROM `myTable` WHERE `status` = 1
        OFFSET $offset LIMIT 500
    ) ORDER BY rand() LIMIT $limit
";

Well, its sampling method has bias however.

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Maybe you meant ORDER BY rand() in the end instead of ORDER BY $limit –  danishgoel Sep 24 '11 at 18:39
    
@danishgoel Oh, right. I changed. –  minhee Sep 24 '11 at 18:44

If it is ok to show picks from a slice of the data, and switch to the next after some time, you can use a materialized view to dramatically speed up things for user. Every row has an equal chance! Slices can be defined by any method, even another random(). I use a random 1% - slice in the demo.

Steps

1.) Table for sample data (= materialized view). NO indexes, as long as the table is small. Include only columns you need for the purpose to further reduce data

2.) Stored procedure (or query, if your RDBMS is not up to it) that refills the sample. This happens in the background, speed is good but not as essential. Minimize blind spot!

3.) Stored procedure (or query, if your RDBMS ...) that selects actual rows for user by random.

4.) Use a cronjob or trigger your event in some other way to resample.

5.) Extremely simple and fast in the app.

The following demo is tested and works for me in PostgreSQL v8.4 - 9.1:

Code

-- 0) dummy table for demo

CREATE TABLE my_table
( my_id int4 primary key
 ,status int4
-- , some other fields
);

-- 0) dummy rows for the demo, one third gets status = 1

INSERT INTO my_table 
SELECT x, x%3 FROM generate_series (1,10000,1) AS x;

-- 1) sample / materialized view

CREATE TABLE my_sample
( my_id int4 primary key
-- , some other fields      -- just the fields you need from my_table
);

-- 2) resample data (refill materialized view)

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION f_my_sample()
  RETURNS SETOF my_sample AS
$BODY$
DECLARE
    my_slices   int4 := 100;
    my_limit    int4 := (count(*)/my_slices)::int4 FROM my_table WHERE status = 1;      -- same criteria as in body
    my_offset   int4 := my_limit * (random()*100)::int4;
BEGIN

CREATE TEMP TABLE temp_x ON COMMIT DROP AS  -- minimize downtime, generate sample in the background
SELECT my_id    -- ,some other fields
  FROM my_table
 WHERE status = 1
 ORDER BY my_id -- to be sure that you pick a different slice, you need to order. In case of complete random, this is not needed.
OFFSET my_offset
 LIMIT my_limit;

TRUNCATE my_sample; -- faster than delete

INSERT INTO my_sample
TABLE temp_x;   -- short for "SELECT * FROM"

END;
$BODY$
  LANGUAGE plpgsql VOLATILE;

-- 3) stored procedure for use

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION f_my_pick()
  RETURNS SETOF my_sample AS
$BODY$
BEGIN

RETURN QUERY
SELECT *
  FROM my_sample
 ORDER BY RANDOM()
 LIMIT 4;

END;
$BODY$
  LANGUAGE plpgsql VOLATILE;

-- 4) cronjob triggers

SELECT f_my_sample();

-- 5) use in your app

SELECT * FROM f_my_pick();
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