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Is it possible to namespace animations? Specifically, my problem is that on a given element $myElement I am doing animations of two types. Now I would like to use .stop() on only one of these types, not both.

How can I do that?

EDIT

Code available here: http://jsfiddle.net/y34ME/1/

My problem is that when I click the span I want it to fade away, regardless of whether I do a mouseout. Currently, the mouseout interrupts the fading away because of the .stop(), but I need the .stop() to prevent mouseover and mouseout events to queue up.

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4  
You can use two different queues. How about showing some actual code? –  Matt Ball Sep 24 '11 at 18:27
    
@all: I've added a fiddle, and an explanation. –  Randomblue Sep 24 '11 at 18:57
1  
You can't send reply notifications to everybody on SO. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Sep 24 '11 at 19:01
    
@Tomalak: Thanks for clarifying –  Randomblue Sep 24 '11 at 19:03
    
@Randomblue: Not a problem. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Sep 24 '11 at 19:04
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted
+50

I think what you really want is to not trigger the mouseout at all if you're already fading the element away. Andrew's method works well, but if you want to keep your event handlers intact (for example, if there's a way to show this element again), use a state class:

$('p').delegate('span:not(.hidden)', {
    'mouseover': function () {
       $(this).stop(true, true).animate({backgroundColor: 'blue'}, 1000);
    },
    'mouseout':function () {
       $(this).stop(true, true).animate({backgroundColor: 'white'}, 1000);
    },
    'click': function () {
       $(this).addClass('hidden').stop(true, true).animate({backgroundColor: 'green'}, 1000).fadeTo(2000, 0);
    }
});

http://jsfiddle.net/y34ME/4/

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Is there a reason you need to use delegate? This code seems to do what you want:

$("span").hover(
    function() {
        $(this).animate({backgroundColor: "blue"}, 1000);
    },
    function() {
        $(this).animate({backgroundColor: "white"}, 1000);
    }
);

$("span").click(function() {
    $(this).animate({backgroundColor: "green"}, 1000).fadeTo(2000, 0);
});
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Yeah, I want to use .delegate() to limit the number of event handlers are defined, for performance reasons –  Randomblue Sep 30 '11 at 20:01
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Just use undelegate. For cleaner code it can all be encapsulated in one delegate call also.

  $('p').delegate('span',{
                'mouseover':function(e){  
       $(this).stop(true, true).animate({backgroundColor: 'blue'}, 1000);
                 },
                'mouseout':function(e){
       $(this).stop(true, true).animate({backgroundColor: 'white'}, 1000);
                },
                'click':function(e){
       $(this).animate({backgroundColor: 'green'}, 1000).fadeTo(2000, 0).undelegate( 'mouseout' );
                }

                });
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Undelegate is too strong! I don't want to undelegate all spans, just this one. –  Randomblue Sep 30 '11 at 20:05
    
give it a class then and create a condition around just that span –  Andrew Dover Oct 3 '11 at 14:23
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