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QUESTION 1 (13 marks)
On gaul, change your working directory to /bin/
(a)What will you get when executing pwd command? Explain why did you get that output?
(b) Use a Unix command to display the file names (do not display any of the directory contents, if any) in the current working directory whose names:
I. (2 marks) are of length exactly 15 characters

This is the only one I can not get done on my assignment, i wrote two regular expressions but i can not tell which one is correct

ls /bin/ | grep -c '([0-9])([a-z])*{1,15}'
8

ls /bin/ | grep -c '[0-9][a-z]*{1,15}'
45

it has to only be characters A-Z, 0-9 and _

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"can not tell which one is correct" - huh? you can count, right? One of them is obviously wrong. And the other is either correct or only works for your case but hase a bug. asking about the latter one is fine, but about the former one?? –  Karoly Horvath Sep 24 '11 at 19:19
    
clearly one of this is wrong, but which one, the 8 just means there are 8 files with 15 characters in the name, and the 45 says there are 45 files with names that contain 15 characters. –  BeagleBoy360 Sep 24 '11 at 19:25
    
@Anthony, how many files are there? Can you count the ones that are 15 manually? If so, that will tell you that one of those is wrong. However, I think they're both wrong, and you shouldn't use regex. –  Matthew Flaschen Sep 24 '11 at 19:29
    
@MatthewFlaschen there are around 700 so i could...but time consuming for 2 marks out of 80. –  BeagleBoy360 Sep 24 '11 at 19:33
    
even if do it by regex, neither your expression is correct. since you have used {1,15}. it will match one character to 15 characters. not required "exactly 15 characters". –  Kent Sep 24 '11 at 19:38

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I think the following ls command is enough for your problem:

ls -d ???????????????

from ls man page:

 -d, --directory
              list directory entries instead of contents, and do not dereference symbolic links

and 15 "?" means, the name of dir/file should be exactly length of 15.

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You're making it more complicated than it needs to be. It doesn't say to use regex, nor does it restrict it to those characters (actual filenames are not limited to those).

Look at this documentation.

Hint: You want to match 15 single characters using a string of one or more of the characters given (?, *, or [).

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well i then used "ls ???????????????" but it includes - and . which he doesnt want, and the whole question is about regex so im assuming he wnats one that uses regex On gaul, change your working directory to /bin/ (a) (2 marks) What will you get when executing pwd command? Explain why did you get that output? (b) Use a Unix command to display the file names (do not display any of the directory contents, if any) in the current working directory whose names: I. (2 marks) are of length exactly 15 characters II. (2 marks) have a z as the second letter III. (2 marks) end with i or j –  BeagleBoy360 Sep 24 '11 at 19:29
    
@Anthony, the question does not ask about regex. I'm not sure what - is, but try using the -d modifier as Kent suggested. You can do the z and i, j parts with shell globbing too. –  Matthew Flaschen Sep 24 '11 at 19:36
    
I misread what the teacher wanted, the a-b 0-9 and _ only matter for words. This question said with 15 characters, my mistake, its been a long assignment –  BeagleBoy360 Sep 24 '11 at 19:38
    
@Anthony, for the i, j part see the bracket expression docs, particularly #2. –  Matthew Flaschen Sep 24 '11 at 19:41

Awk is a handy tool for this job:

ls /bin | grep -ve "[^A-Za-z_]" | awk '{if (length == 15) print $0}'
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well since you have already got the power of grep, we don't need the nuclear head - awk. how about ls -d|grep -P '^[a-zA-Z_]{15}$' ? –  Kent Sep 24 '11 at 19:46

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