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I have a file structure like so

a/file1
a/file2
a/file3
a/...
b/file1
b/file2
b/file3
b/...
...

where within each dir, some files have the same file size, and I would like to delete those.

I guess if the problem could be solved for one dir e.g. dir a, then I could wrap a for-loop around it?

for f in *; do
???
done

But how do I find files with same size?

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are they Same size or identical ones? –  user962993 Sep 24 '11 at 20:25

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Solution working with "file names with spaces" (based on Kent (+1) and awiebe (+1) posts):

for FILE in *; do stat -c"%s/%n" "$FILE"; done | awk -F/ '{if ($1 in a)print $2; else a[$1]=1}' | xargs echo rm

to make it remove duplicates, remove echo from xargs.

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 ls -l|grep '^-'|awk '{if(a[$5]){ a[$5]=a[$5]"\n"$NF; b[$5]++;} else a[$5]=$NF} END{for(x in b)print a[x];}'

this will only check files, no directories.

$5 is the size of ls command

test:

kent@ArchT60:/tmp/t$ ls -l
total 16
-rw-r--r-- 1 kent kent  51 Sep 24 22:23 a
-rw-r--r-- 1 kent kent 153 Sep 24 22:24 all
-rw-r--r-- 1 kent kent  51 Sep 24 22:23 b
-rw-r--r-- 1 kent kent  51 Sep 24 22:23 c
kent@ArchT60:/tmp/t$ ls -l|grep '^-'|awk '{if(a[$5]){ a[$5]=a[$5]"\n"$NF; b[$5]++;} else a[$5]=$NF} END{for(x in b)print a[x];}'
a
b
c
kent@ArchT60:/tmp/t$ 

update based on Michał Šrajer 's comment:

Now filenames with spaces are also supported

command:

 ls -l|grep '^-'|awk '{ f=""; if(NF>9)for(i=9;i<=NF;i++)f=f?f" "$i:$i; else f=$9; 
        if(a[$5]){ a[$5]=a[$5]"\n"f; b[$5]++;} else a[$5]=f}END{for(x in b)print a[x];}'

test:

kent@ArchT60:/tmp/t$ l
total 24
-rw-r--r-- 1 kent kent  51 Sep 24 22:23 a
-rw-r--r-- 1 kent kent 153 Sep 24 22:24 all
-rw-r--r-- 1 kent kent  51 Sep 24 22:23 b
-rw-r--r-- 1 kent kent  51 Sep 24 22:23 c
-rw-r--r-- 1 kent kent  51 Sep 24 22:40 x y

kent@ArchT60:/tmp/t$ ls -l|grep '^-'|awk '{ f=""
        if(NF>9)for(i=9;i<=NF;i++)f=f?f" "$i:$i; else f=$9; 
        if(a[$5]){ a[$5]=a[$5]"\n"f; b[$5]++;} else a[$5]=f} END{for(x in b)print a[x];}'
a
b
c
x y

kent@ArchT60:/tmp/t$
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1  
Great solution (+1). For those not familiar with awk, the $NF is a last field (file name). One, remark - this solution will not work with filenames containing spaces. –  Michał Šrajer Sep 24 '11 at 20:38
    
Cool solution! =) If I do for f in $(find . -type d);do cd "$f" && your_solution && cd ..;done then the cd command fails. How would you execute your script in each dir? –  Sandra Schlichting Sep 24 '11 at 20:53
    
@MichałŠrajer thanks a lot for pointing this out. I have updated my answer based on your comment. However there is still a limitation, if a filename has continuous spaces, e.g. "foo bar" the awk line will fail. ^_^ –  Kent Sep 24 '11 at 20:57
    
@SandraSchlichting let's take an example, say you run your for script under "/tmp". Your find . -type d will find all dirs (sub dirs as well) under /tmp. let's say under /tmp, we have /tmp/a, /tmp/a/a2/a3, /tmp/b. your "find" output would be ./a, ./a/a2/a3 and ./b. so if you cd ./a/a2/a3 and done something, then cd .. will bring you to /tmp/a/a2, next you want to do cd "./b", obviously, there is no "b" dir under /tmp/a/a2. so you got it. the error has nothing to do with the awk. you have to refine your for-find script. –  Kent Sep 24 '11 at 21:13
    
@Kent : I see. I should of course use -maxdepth 1 : for f in $(find . -maxdepth 1 -type d);do cd "$f" && your_solution;done. No errors, but no output either. I suspect the cd "$f= doesn't really cd. –  Sandra Schlichting Sep 24 '11 at 21:27

Here is code if you need the size of a file:

FILESIZE=$(stat -c%s "$FILENAME")
echo "Size of $FILENAME = $FILESIZE bytes."

Then use a for loop to get the first item in your structure, Store the size of that file in a variable.

Nest a for loop in that for loop to each item in your structure(excluding the current item) to the current item.

Route all the names of identical files into a text file to ensure you have written you script correctly(insteed of executing rm immediately) .

Execute rm on the contents of this file.

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It sounds like this has been answered several times and in several different ways, so I may be beating a dead horse but here goes...

find DIR_TO_RUN_ON -size SIZE_OF_FILE_TO_MATCH -exec rm {} \;

find is an awesome command and I highly recommend reading it's manpage.

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Looks like what you really want is a duplicate file finder?

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