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I was wondering if there is a similar way to do this (C# definition) in Objective-C:

public void MyWorkingMethod (string Argument1, params int numbers)

It can be called like MyWorkingMethod("a") or MyWorkingMethod("b", 1, 2, 3).

I'm trying to implement the string.Format as C# does in Objective-c.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Note that there is already a stringWithFormat method that is very similar to string.Format found in the .NET Framework. That said, you can definitely have a variable number of arguments in an Objective-C method. See this link for details.

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yes i know about the stringWithFormat the thing about the format of .Net is that i can do this: string.Format("I want to {0} this string. it {1} very important to me to be able to {0} strings, because it {1}","format","is") and i would get as result the {0}'s replaced by the ToString() result of parameter 1, and the {1}'s replaced by parameter 2... –  Leonardo Sep 25 '11 at 4:07

I wrote [how to use] Variable arguments in Objective-C methods up a few years ago.

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What exactly string.Format does? If you need a function, declare and define it as you'd do in C (including variadic cases):

void MyWorkingMethod (NSString *string, int numbers)

If it's related to formatting a string, have you checked NSString's stringWithFormat:? What about libc sprintf?

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It should be something like

 - (void) MyWorkingMethod : ( NSString * ) Argument1 secondInput:(NSArray *) numbers {
 }

And you will call the function with

[self MyWorkingMethod:@"Hello World" secondInput:numbers];
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i don't want a defined number of parameters... arrays can grow but i would still have to supply a array... –  Leonardo Sep 25 '11 at 4:11

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