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I can do a Delete insert, update actually in my program, and I try to do an insert by call a created Store Procedure from my Data Base.

This a button insert I make work well.

  private void btnAdd_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        SqlConnection con = new SqlConnection(dc.Con);
        SqlCommand cmd = new SqlCommand("Command String", con);

        da.InsertCommand = new SqlCommand("INSERT INTO tblContacts VALUES (@FirstName,@LastName)", con);
        da.InsertCommand.Parameters.Add("@FirstName", SqlDbType.VarChar).Value = txtFirstName.Text;
        da.InsertCommand.Parameters.Add("@LastName", SqlDbType.VarChar).Value = txtLastName.Text;

        con.Open();
        da.InsertCommand.ExecuteNonQuery();
        con.Close();
        dt.Clear();
        da.Fill(dt);
    } 

This is the start of the button to call the procedure named sp_Add_contact to add a contact. The two parameters for sp_Add_contact(@FirstName,@LastName). I searched on google for some good example but I found nothing interesting...

Thank's for helping me!

private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        SqlConnection con = new SqlConnection(dc.Con);
        SqlCommand cmd = new SqlCommand("Command String", con);
        cmd.CommandType = CommandType.StoredProcedure;
        ???

        con.Open();
        da. ???.ExecuteNonQuery();
        con.Close();
        dt.Clear();
        da.Fill(dt);
    }
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Just an extra bit of info - you should not name your application stored procedures with an sp_ prefix, like above with sp_Add_contact. the sp_ prefix is a system stored proc naming convention, that, when SQL sees it, will search through all system stored procedures first before any application or user space stored procs. As a matter of performance, if you care about that in your application, the sp_ prefix will degrade your response times. –  Robert Achmann Nov 25 at 16:43

3 Answers 3

up vote 66 down vote accepted

It's pretty much the same as running a query. In your original code you are creating a command object, putting it in the cmd variable, and never use it. Here, however, you will use that instead of da.InsertCommand.

Also, use a using for all disposable objects, so that you are sure that they are disposed properly:

private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e) {
  using (SqlConnection con = new SqlConnection(dc.Con)) {
    using (SqlCommand cmd = new SqlCommand("sp_Add_contact", con)) {
      cmd.CommandType = CommandType.StoredProcedure;

      cmd.Parameters.Add("@FirstName", SqlDbType.VarChar).Value = txtFirstName.Text;
      cmd.Parameters.Add("@LastName", SqlDbType.VarChar).Value = txtLastName.Text;

      con.Open();
      cmd.ExecuteNonQuery();
    }
  }
}
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1  
but if this procedure returns data, how can I catch it in C#? –  M009 Apr 16 '13 at 15:16
4  
@M009: Then you use ExecuteReader or ExecuteScalar to call it. –  Guffa Apr 16 '13 at 18:36
    
Actually I figured it out, first you have to use the "cmd" to declare and initialize a SqlDataAdapter as: [SqlDataAdapter da = new SqlDataAdapter(cmd);], then [da.SelectCommand = cmd;], and finally [da.Fill(ds);] where "ds" is a dataset that you have previously declared.. Then you can use this dataset to read data anyway you desire :) –  M009 Apr 17 '13 at 15:46
2  
@M009: Yes, that is another way to do the same thing. The data adapter uses ExecuteReader. –  Guffa Apr 17 '13 at 21:35
    
@volearix: Regarding your suggested edit; There is no "standard C# bracketing format", and all brackets that are not strictly needed should not be removed. –  Guffa Nov 13 at 17:19
   using (SqlConnection con = new SqlConnection(dc.Con))
            {
                using (SqlCommand cmd = new SqlCommand("SP_ADD", con))
                {
                    cmd.CommandType = CommandType.StoredProcedure;
                    cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@FirstName", txtfirstname);
                    cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@LastName", txtlastname);
                    con.Open();
                    cmd.ExecuteNonQuery();
                }

            }

this should work.. because u have add parameters which is needed for SP to execute.

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AddWithValue is a bad idea; SQL Server doesn't always use the correct length for nvarchar or varchar, causing an implicit conversion to occur. It's better to specify the parameter's length explicitly, and then add the value separately using parameter.Value = txtfirstname. –  George Stocker Nov 18 at 13:31

Parameter values can be supplied if a stored procedure is written to accept them.

    param = new SqlParameter("@COUNTRY", "Germany");
    param.Direction = ParameterDirection.Input;
    param.DbType = DbType.String;
    command.Parameters.Add(param);

Full Source..Stored Procedure with Parameter

Balmer

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