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C# - Is there a better alternative than this to ‘switch on type’?

I need to iterate through all properties of my class and to check if its type of int the i need to do something, if its string .. then do something. I need it using switch-case. Here i am using switch in the following manner, but it asks for some constant. see the code below:

 public static bool ValidateProperties(object o)
        {
            if(o !=null)
            {
                var sourceType = o.GetType();
                var properties = sourceType.GetProperties(BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.Static);
                foreach (var property in properties)
                {
                    var type = property.GetType();
                    switch (type)
                    {
                        *case typeof(int):* getting error here
                            // d
                    }
                }
            }
        }

Also i want to know , what check should I use, typeof(int) or typeof(Int32)?

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marked as duplicate by nawfal, mgibsonbr, James Wood, Brian Mains, Ram kiran Jan 3 '13 at 3:14

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
FYI, both questions are of different context. He is asking on controls , while i am asking on data types. Please be sure before any down voting or close voting. Don't be blind. Guys having such reputations are not supposed to do such kiddish mistakes. –  Amit Ranjan Sep 25 '11 at 14:20
1  
1  

4 Answers 4

up vote 10 down vote accepted

You cannot use a switch block to test values of type Type. Compiling your code should give you an error saying something like:

A switch expression or case label must be a bool, char, string, integral, enum, or corresponding nullable type

You'll need to use if-else statements instead.

Also: typeof(int) and typeof(Int32) are equivalent. int is a keyword and Int32 is the type name.

UPDATE

If you expect that most types will be intrinsic you may improve performance by using a switch block with Type.GetTypeCode(...).

For example:

switch (Type.GetTypeCode(type))
{
    case TypeCode.Int32:
        // It's an int
        break;

    case TypeCode.String:
        // It's a string
        break;

    // Other type code cases here...

    default:
        // Fallback to using if-else statements...
        if (type == typeof(MyCoolType))
        {
            // ...
        }
        else if (type == typeof(MyOtherType))
        {
            // ...
        } // etc...
}
share|improve this answer
    
thanks , Marten, i am looking into it... will get back to you soon. Actually , i am trying to automating the frontend validation process so i need some idea/guidance on automated datatype validation –  Amit Ranjan Sep 25 '11 at 0:24

A good and extensible way to do this is to make a dictionary of types and delegates of appropriate type, based on what you want to do with values of that type.

For example:

var typeProcessorMap = new Dictionary<Type, Delegate>
{
    { typeof(int), new Action<int>(i => { /* do something with i */ }) },
    { typeof(string), new Action<string>(s => { /* do something with s */ }) },
};

And then:

void ValidateProperties(object o)
{
    var t = o.GetType();
    typeProcessorMap[t].DynamicInvoke(o); // invoke appropriate delegate
}

This solution is extensible, configurable even at run time, and as long as you keep the keys and types of delegate values in typeProcessorMap correctly matched is also type safe.

See it in action.

share|improve this answer
    
This is a nice solution, bearing in mind that DynamicInvoke can be a bit slow in performance-critical sections. –  Kirk Woll Sep 25 '11 at 0:48
    
@KirkWoll: Would making all of the delegates Action<object> and casting the parameter inside the delegate body be faster? I 'm not sure exactly what DynamicInvoke does behind the scenes. –  Jon Sep 25 '11 at 0:53
    
I'm not sure exactly what DynamicInvoke does behind the scenes either. :) But I posted an "answer" below to illustrate the performance difference. –  Kirk Woll Sep 25 '11 at 15:28

This "answer" is an elaboration for Jon's answer. (Marking CW)

For the record, DynamicInvoke is a bit slow. To illustrate this, consider the following program:

void Main()
{
    Func<int, string> myFunc = i => i.ToString();
    myFunc.DynamicInvoke(1);   // Invoke once so initial run costs are not considered
    myFunc(1);

    Stopwatch stopwatch = new Stopwatch();

    stopwatch.Start();
    for (int i = 0; i < 1000000; i++)
        myFunc.DynamicInvoke(1);
    stopwatch.Stop();

    var elapsed = stopwatch.Elapsed;

    stopwatch.Restart();
    for (int i = 0; i < 1000000; i++)
        myFunc(1);
    stopwatch.Stop();

    var elapsed2 = stopwatch.Elapsed;

    Console.WriteLine("DynamicInvoke: " + elapsed);
    Console.WriteLine("Direct Invocation: " + elapsed2);
}

Prints out:

DynamicInvoke: 00:00:03.1959900
Direct Invocation: 00:00:00.0735220

Which means that DynamicInvoke (in this simple case) is 42 times slower than direct invocation.

share|improve this answer

Usually, the easiest solution is to switch on the type name:

switch (type.Name)
{
    case "Int32":
    ...
}
share|improve this answer
    
thats great...... –  Amit Ranjan Sep 25 '11 at 0:30
4  
IMO, the sacrifice of type-safety is not worth it. After all, an if/else chain is almost equally concise and has the virtue of catching typos (and far more importantly -- future refactorings) at compile-time. –  Kirk Woll Sep 25 '11 at 0:31
2  
This is not fun to maintain. –  Jason Sep 25 '11 at 0:34
    
Have you guys heard about unit tests? Anyway, I do use Jon's approach sometimes, but it's usually overkill. –  Diego Mijelshon Sep 25 '11 at 3:00
1  
@Diego, unit tests are not a replacement for type safety. –  Kirk Woll Sep 25 '11 at 15:30

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