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i just found this difficult interview question online and I was hoping someone could help me make sense of it. It is a generic question...given a singly linked list, swap each element of the list in pairs so that 1->2->3->4 would become 2->1->4->3.

You have to swap the elements, not the values. The answer should work for circular lists where the tail is pointing back to the head of the list. You do not have to check if the tail points to an intermediate (non-head) element.

So, I thought:

public class Node
{
     public int n;     // value
     public Node next; // pointer to next node
}

What is the best way to implement this? Can anyone help?

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3  
What do you have so far? :D –  Gordon Gustafson Sep 25 '11 at 1:02
    
This is an interview question, not homework? Interesting. –  corsiKa Sep 25 '11 at 1:23
2  
What is the downvote for? This is a valid question, and it's interesting too... upvoting. –  WChargin Sep 25 '11 at 2:22

10 Answers 10

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I agree with @Stephen about not giving the answer (entirely), but I think I should give you hints.

An important thing to understand is that Java does not explicitly specify pointers - rather, whenever a non-primitive (e.g. not char, byte, int, double, float, long, boolean, short) is passed to a function, it is passed as a reference. So, you can use temporary variables to swap the values. Try to code one yourself or look below:

 public static void swapNodeNexts(final Node n1, final Node n2) {  
    final Node n1Next = n1.next;  
    final Node n2Next = n2.next;  
    n2.next = n1Next;  
    n1.next = n2Next;  
 }  

Then you'll need a data structure to hold the Nodes. It's important that there be an even number of Nodes only (odd numbers unnecessarily complicate things). It's also necessary to initialize the nodes. You should put this in your main method.

  public static final int NUMPAIRS = 3;
 public static void main(final String[] args) {
    final Node[] nodeList = new Node[NUMPAIRS * 2];
    for (int i = 0; i < nodeList.length; i++) {
        nodeList[i] = new Node();
        nodeList[i].n = (i + 1) * 10;
        // 10 20 30 40
    }
    // ...
 } 

The important part is to set the Node next values. You can't just loop through with a for loop for all of them, because then the last one's next would throw an IndexOutOfBoundsException. Try to make one yourself, or peek at mine.

  for (int i = 0; i < nodeList.length - 1; i++) {
    nodeList[i].next = nodeList[i + 1];
 }
 nodeList[nodeList.length - 1].next = nodeList[0];

Then run your swap function on them with a for loop. But remember, you don't want to run it on every node… think about it a bit.

If you can't figure it out, here is my final code:

 // Node
 class Node {
    public int n; // value
    public Node next; // pointer to next node

    @Override
    public String toString() {
        return "Node [n=" + n + ", nextValue=" + next.n + "]";
    }

 }

 // NodeMain
 public class NodeMain {
    public static final int NUMPAIRS = 3;

    public static void main(final String[] args) {
        final Node[] nodeList = new Node[NUMPAIRS * 2];
        for (int i = 0; i < nodeList.length; i++) {
            nodeList[i] = new Node();
            nodeList[i].n = (i + 1) * 10;
            // 10 20 30 40
        }
        for (int i = 0; i < nodeList.length - 1; i++) {
            nodeList[i].next = nodeList[i + 1];
        }
        nodeList[nodeList.length - 1].next = nodeList[0];

        // This makes 1 -> 2 -> 3 -> 4 -> 1 etc.
        printNodes(nodeList);

        for (int i = 0; i < nodeList.length; i += 2) {
            swapNodeNexts(nodeList[i], nodeList[i + 1]);
        }

        // Now: 2 -> 1 -> 4 -> 3 -> 1 etc.
        printNodes(nodeList);

    }

    private static void printNodes(final Node[] nodeList) {
        for (int i = 0; i < nodeList.length; i++) {
            System.out.println("Node " + (i + 1) + ": " + nodeList[i].n
                    + "; next: " + nodeList[i].next.n);
        }
        System.out.println();
    }

    private static void swapNodeNexts(final Node n1, final Node n2) {
        final Node n1Next = n1.next;
        final Node n2Next = n2.next;
        n2.next = n1Next;
        n1.next = n2Next;
    }
 } 

I hope you were able to figure out at least some of this with guidance. More importantly, however, it's important that you understand the concepts here. If you have any questions, just leave a comment.

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1  
A data structure to holds the nodes? How about a linked list? An odd number of nodes "complicates" things? It's an "interview"question: let's go ahead and assume that occasionally the job might be complicated. –  Dave Newton Sep 25 '11 at 11:38
    
@Dave: Yes, you're correct about complications. However, there are also many interpretations of the problem. Will the last one be unchanged? What will it link to? Because of this (and as odds weren't mentioned in the question), I tried to simplify this to give the asker a general idea of how to approach the problem. Think of it as an exercise for him. I'm not sure what you mean by "[h]ow about a linked list" - if you're referring to java.util.LinkedList, I was trying to avoid that because it's important to understand the workings, but yes, in a real situation it would be more appropriate. –  WChargin Sep 25 '11 at 17:12
    
No, I'm saying that you don't need to hold a linked list in an array, you already have a linked list. –  Dave Newton Sep 25 '11 at 17:34

Simple recursive solution in Java:

public static void main(String[] args)
{
    Node n = new Node(1);
    n.next = new Node(2);
    n.next.next = new Node(3);
    n.next.next.next = new Node(4);
    n.next.next.next.next = new Node(5);

    n = swap(n);
}
public static Node swap(Node n)
{
    if(n == null || n.next == null)
        return n;
    Node buffer = n;
    n = n.next;
    buffer.next = n.next;
    n.next = buffer;
    n.next.next = swap(buffer.next);
    return n;
 }

public static class Node
{
    public int data; // value
    public Node next; // pointer to next node

    public Node(int value)
    {
        data = value;
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Methods needed to run this program :

public static void main(String[] args) {
    int iNoNodes = 10;
    System.out.println("Total number of nodes : " + iNoNodes);
    Node headNode = NodeUtils.createLinkedListOfNElements(iNoNodes);
    Node ptrToSecondNode = headNode.getNext();
    NodeUtils.printLinkedList(headNode);
    reversePairInLinkedList(headNode);
    NodeUtils.printLinkedList(ptrToSecondNode);
}

Approach is almost same, others are trying to explain. Code is self-explainatory.

private static void reversePairInLinkedList(Node headNode) {
    Node tempNode = headNode;
    if (tempNode == null || tempNode.getNext() == null)
        return;
    Node a = tempNode;
    Node b = tempNode.getNext();
    Node bNext = b.getNext(); //3
    b.setNext(a);
    if (bNext != null && bNext.getNext() != null)
        a.setNext(bNext.getNext());
    else
        a.setNext(null);
    reversePairInLinkedList(bNext);
}
share|improve this answer

Algo(node n1) -

keep 2 pointers n1 and n2, at the current 2 nodes. n1 --> n2 --->...

  • if(n1 and n2 link to each other) return n2;

  • if(n1 is NULL) return NULL;

  • if(n2 is NULL) return n1;

  • if(n1 and n2 do not link to each other and are not null)

  • change the pointer of n2 to n1.

  • call the algorthm recursively on n2.next

  • return n2;

Code (working) in c++

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

class node
{
public:
int value;
node* next;
node(int val);
};

node::node(int val)
{
value = val;
}

node* reverse(node* n)
{

if(n==NULL) return NULL;
node* nxt = (*n).next;
if(nxt==NULL) return n;

if((*nxt).next==n) return nxt;
else
    {
node* temp = (*nxt).next;
(*nxt).next = n;
 (*n).next   = reverse(temp);
}
return nxt;

}
void print(node* n)
{
node* temp = n;
while(temp!=NULL)
    {
    cout<<(*temp).value;
    temp = (*temp).next;
    }
cout << endl;

}

int main()
{
node* n = new node(0);
node* temp = n;

for(int i=1;i<10;i++)
{

node* n1 = new node(i);
(*temp).next = n1;
temp = n1;
}
print(n);
node* x = reverse(n);
print(x);

}

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The general approach to take is to step through the list, and on every other step you reorder the list nodes by assigning the node values.

But I think you will get more out of this (i.e. learn more) if you actually design, implement and test this yourself. (You don't get a free "phone a friend" or "ask SO" at a job interview ...)

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Yep, write an iterative routine that progresses two links in each iteration. Remember the link from the previous iteration so that you can back-patch it, then swap the current two links. The tricky parts are getting started (to a small extent) and knowing when to finish (to a larger one), especially if you end up having an odd number of elements.

share|improve this answer
public static Node swapInPairs(Node n)
{
    Node two;
    if(n ==null ||n.next.next ==null)
    {
        Node one =n;
        Node twoo = n.next;
        twoo.next = one;
        one.next =null;
        return twoo;            
    }
    else{
        Node one = n;
        two = n.next;   
        Node three = two.next;
        two.next =one;
        Node res = swapInPairs(three);
        one.next =res;          
    }
    return two;
}

I wrote the code at atomic level. So i hope it is self explanatory. I tested it. :)

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public static Node swapPairs(Node start)
{
    // empty or one-node lists don't need swapping
    if (start == null || start.next == start) return start;

    // any list we return from here on will start at what's the second node atm
    Node result = start.next;

    Node current = start; 
    Node previous = null;     // so we can fix links from the previous pair

    do
    {
        Node node1 = current;
        Node node2 = current.next;

        // swap node1 and node2 (1->2->? ==> 2->1->?)
        node1.next = node2.next;
        node2.next = node1;

        // If prev exists, it currently points at node1, not node2.  Fix that
        if (previous != null) previous.next = node2;

        previous = current;

        // only have to bump once more to get to the next pair;
        // swapping already bumped us forward once
        current = current.next;

    } while (current != start && current.next != start);

    // The tail needs to point at the new head
    // (if current == start, then previous is the tail, otherwise current is)
    ((current == start) ? previous : current).next = result;

    return result;
}
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//2.1 , 2.2 Crack the code interview

#include<stdio.h>
#include<stdlib.h>
#include<malloc.h>

struct Node{
    int info;
    struct Node *next;
};




 struct Node *insert(struct Node *head,int data){
    struct Node *temp,*ptr;

     temp = (struct Node*)malloc(sizeof(struct Node));
     temp->info=data;
     temp->next=NULL;

     if(head==NULL)
        head=temp;

     else{
        ptr=head;
        while(ptr->next!=NULL)
        {
        ptr=ptr->next;
        }
        ptr->next=temp;
     }
    return head;
 }


 struct Node* reverse(struct Node* head){
    struct Node *current,*prev,*next;
    current = head;
    prev=NULL;
    while(current!=NULL){
        next=current->next;
        current->next = prev;
        prev=current;
        current=next;
    }
    head=prev;
    return head;
}
/*nth till last element in linked list*/

void nthlastElement(struct Node *head,int n){
    struct Node *ptr;
    int last=0,i;
    ptr=head;

    while(ptr!=NULL){
        last++;
        //printf("%d\n",last);
        ptr=ptr->next;
    }

    ptr=head;
    for(i=0;i<n-1;i++){
        ptr=ptr->next;      
    }

    for(i=0;i<=(last-n);i++){
        printf("%d\n",ptr->info);
        ptr=ptr->next;
    }
}

 void display(struct Node* head){
      while(head!=NULL){
        printf("Data:%d\n",head->info);
        head=head->next;
      }
 }



 void deleteDup(struct Node* head){
    struct Node *ptr1,*ptr2,*temp;

    ptr1=head;

    while(ptr1!=NULL&&ptr1->next!=NULL){
            ptr2=ptr1;
          while(ptr2->next!=NULL){
            if(ptr1->info==ptr2->next->info){
                temp=ptr2->next;
                ptr2->next=ptr2->next->next;
                free(temp);
            }
            else{
              ptr2=ptr2->next;
              }

          }  
          ptr1=ptr1->next;
    }
}

 void main(){
    struct Node *head=NULL;
    head=insert(head,10);
    head=insert(head,20);
    head=insert(head,30);
    head=insert(head,10);
    head=insert(head,10);
    printf("BEFORE REVERSE\n"); 
    display(head);
    head=reverse(head);
    printf("AFTER REVERSE\n");
    display(head);
    printf("NTH TO LAST\n");
    nthlastElement(head,2);
     //printf("AFTER DUPLICATE REMOVE\n");
    //deleteDup(head);
    //removeDuplicates(head);
     //display(head);
 }
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public class Node
{
     public int n;     // value
     public Node next; // pointer to next node
}

Node[] n = new Node[length];

for (int i=0; i<n.length; i++)
{
    Node tmp = n[i];
    n[i] = n[i+1];
    n[i+1] = tmp;
    n[i+1].next = n[i].next; 
    n[i].next = tmp;
}
share|improve this answer
    
-1. First, you just give code without explaning. Second, in Java, all code must be in a class (so everything outside of the first } is invalid). Third, where is length declared? Fourth, what is length1111? Fifth, even if these are corrected, this won't produce the correct output. –  WChargin Sep 25 '11 at 1:44
    
And another -1 (in spirit; I didn't have the heart) because what's the array for? –  Dave Newton Sep 25 '11 at 1:52
    
@DaveNewton how else would you iterate through the Nodes without putting them in a data structure like an array –  Briggs Sep 25 '11 at 2:17
1  
@AndrewBriggs: Please don't insult my intelligence. I understand about your hardware problem, and I appreciate that you're trying to help. However, realize that a downvote is an opportunity to learn - try to incorporate this into your next answer, maybe. –  WChargin Sep 25 '11 at 2:21
2  
@AndrewBriggs It's a linked list--by following the pointers; that's how they work. Some languages don't have arrays--how would you do it in one of those? (Personally, I found the code somewhat opaque, and I have a modicum of intelligence :) –  Dave Newton Sep 25 '11 at 2:27

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