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I need to add timestamps(created_at updated_at) to an existing table. I tried the following code but it didn't work. I have also tried other solutions I found online but they don't work either.

class AddTimestampsToUser < ActiveRecord::Migration
    def change_table
      add_timestamps(:users)
    end
end

How can I do it?

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2  
In rails 4.1 Code pasted by you works good. –  lokeshjain2008 Jul 25 at 19:49

5 Answers 5

up vote 66 down vote accepted

The timestamp helper is only available in the create_table block. You can add these columns by specifying the column types manually:

class AddTimestampsToUser < ActiveRecord::Migration
    def change_table
      add_column(:users, :created_at, :datetime)
      add_column(:users, :updated_at, :datetime)
    end
end

While this does not have the same terse syntax as the add_timestamps method you have specified above, Rails will still treat these columns as timestamp columns, and update the values as normal.

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1  
Seems like an odd omission, I guess. –  d11wtq Sep 25 '11 at 3:43
1  
This did not work for me in Rails 4. The below solution by "mu is too short" is working. –  newUserNameHere Feb 6 at 21:43
3  
rails g migration AddTimestampsToUser created_at:datetime updated_at:datetime - a shortcut to generate the migration above. –  Kote Aug 25 at 17:32

Migrations are just two class methods (or instance methods in 3.1): up and down (and sometimes a change instance method in 3.1). You want your changes to go into the up method:

class AddTimestmapsToUser < ActiveRecord::Migration
    def self.up # Or `def up` in 3.1
        change_table :users do |t|
            t.timestamps
        end
    end
    def self.down # Or `def down` in 3.1
        remove_column :users, :created_at
        remove_column :users, :updated_at
    end
end

If you're in 3.1 then you could also use change (thanks Dave):

class AddTimestmapsToUser < ActiveRecord::Migration
    def change
        change_table(:users) { |t| t.timestamps }
    end
end

Perhaps you're confusing def change, def change_table, and change_table.

See the migration guide for further details.

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1  
(Well, there's the change method now, although in this case, not the issue :) –  Dave Newton Sep 25 '11 at 1:59
    
@Dave: True enough, I went for generic to avoid the version issues but change is worth a mention so I'll add that too. –  mu is too short Sep 25 '11 at 2:17
    
True mu but I have heard that that is really changing with 3.1 and the 'down' is really going away. Rails to figure out the down method automatically. Have you heard about that? –  Michael Durrant Sep 25 '11 at 2:59
    
@Michael: I've been using MongoDB exclusively with the 3.1 app I'm working on so I haven't worked with 3.1 AR migrations. The docs indicate that everything is moving towards instance methods (for unknown reasons). –  mu is too short Sep 25 '11 at 4:22
    
@MichaelDurrant, there are many scenarios that "change" doesn't cover right now, if up/down go away there will be some angry people :) (add an "unless" clause in your change migration to avoid migration collisions, and try rolling that back...) Even 3 years after you made this comment, I don't think it's changing. :) –  frandroid Feb 14 at 16:37

Your original code is very close to right, you just need to use a different method name. If you're using Rails 3.1 or later, you need to define a change method instead of change_table:

class AddTimestampsToUser < ActiveRecord::Migration
  def change
    add_timestamps(:users)
  end
end

If you're using an older version you need to define up and down methods instead of change_table:

class AddTimestampsToUser < ActiveRecord::Migration
  def up
    add_timestamps(:users)
  end

  def down
    remove_timestamps(:users)
  end
end
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class AddTimestampsToUser < ActiveRecord::Migration
  def change
    change_table :users do |t|
      t.timestamps
    end
  end
end

Available transformations are

change_table :table do |t|
  t.column
  t.index
  t.timestamps
  t.change
  t.change_default
  t.rename
  t.references
  t.belongs_to
  t.string
  t.text
  t.integer
  t.float
  t.decimal
  t.datetime
  t.timestamp
  t.time
  t.date
  t.binary
  t.boolean
  t.remove
  t.remove_references
  t.remove_belongs_to
  t.remove_index
  t.remove_timestamps
end

http://api.rubyonrails.org/classes/ActiveRecord/ConnectionAdapters/Table.html

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1  
You should add a self.down for completeness. –  Jason Noble Dec 4 '11 at 4:06
    
I'm not sure why this isn't marked as the answer. –  Tyler Collier Sep 30 at 17:43

I made a simple function that you can call to add to each table (assuming you have a existing database) the created_at and updated_at fields:

  # add created_at and updated_at to each table found.
  def add_datetime
    tables = ActiveRecord::Base.connection.tables
    tables.each do |t|
      ActiveRecord::Base.connection.add_timestamps t  
    end    
  end
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