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#!/usr/local/bin/bash
out=`grep apache README`
echo $out;

Usually grep shows each match on a separate line when run on the command line. However, in the above scripts, the newline separating each match disappears. Does anyone know how the newline can be preserved?

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It's more a duplicate of Capturing multiple line output to a bash variable – Renato Apr 23 '15 at 15:53

You're not losing it in the assignment but in the echo. You can see this clearly if you:

echo "${out}"

You'll see a similar effect with the following script:

x="Hello,
I
am
a
string
with
newlines"
echo "====="
echo ${x}
echo "====="
echo "${x}"
echo "====="

which outputs:

=====
Hello, I am a string with newlines
=====
Hello,
I
am
a
string
with
newlines
=====

And, irrelevant to your question but I'd like to mention it anyway, I prefer to use the $() construct rather than backticks, just for the added benefit of being able to nest commands. So your script line becomes:

out=$(grep apache README)

Now that may not look any different (and it isn't) but it makes possible more complex commands like:

lines_with_nine=$(grep $(expr 7 + 2) inputfile)
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I didn't know you could do that with $()... learn something new all the time here. – Tanj Apr 16 '09 at 2:18
1  
You can do math without using expr. Just use double-parens: $((7 + 2)) – Barry Brown Apr 16 '09 at 2:23
    
Actually I might try that with all my answers from now on - append a (not always totally) relevant snippet for the education of the swarm :-) – paxdiablo Apr 16 '09 at 2:24
    
Good point, Barry, but it was just an example of nesting - my example-generating skills appear to have deteriorated with age (and/or alcohol :-). – paxdiablo Apr 16 '09 at 2:25
    
I just found out about the $(()) thing, myself. – Barry Brown Apr 16 '09 at 5:43

Put $out in quotes:

#!/usr/local/bin/bash
out=`grep apache README`
echo "$out";
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Quoting variables in bash preserves the whitespace.

For instance:

#!/bin/bash
var1="A B  C   D"
echo $var1   # A B C D
echo "$var1" # A B  C   D

since newlines are whitespace they get "removed"

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