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I'm trying to implement this RFC 4.1. Integer

An XDR signed integer is a 32-bit datum that encodes an integer in the range [-2147483648,2147483647]. The integer is represented in two's complement notation. The most and least significant bytes are 0 and 3, respectively. Integers are declared as follows:

     int identifier;

       (MSB)                   (LSB)
     +-------+-------+-------+-------+
     |byte 0 |byte 1 |byte 2 |byte 3 |                      INTEGER
     +-------+-------+-------+-------+
     <------------32 bits------------>

and here's my code I need to know if there is a better way to do that ?

void packInteger(char *buf,long int i)
{
    if(i>=0) {
        *buf++ = i>>24;
        *buf++ = i>>16;
        *buf++ = i>>8;
        *buf++ = i;
    }
    if(i<0) {
        i = i*-1;
        i =  1 + (unsigned int)(0xffffffffu - i);
        buf[0] = (unsigned int)i>>24;
        buf[1] = (unsigned int)i>>16;
        buf[2] = (unsigned int)i>>8;
        buf[3] = (unsigned int)i;
    }   
}
long int unpackInteger(char *buf)
{
    unsigned long int i2 = ((unsigned long int)buf[0]<<24) |
                           ((unsigned long int)buf[1]<<16) |
                           ((unsigned long int)buf[2]<<8)  |
                           buf[3];
    long int i;
    // change unsigned numbers to signed
    if (i2 <= 0x7fffffffu) { i = i2; }
    else { i = -1 - (long int)(0xffffffffu - i2); }
    return i;
}
int main(void) 
{
    char buf[4];
    packInteger(buf,-31);
    printf("%u %u %u %u\n",buf[0],buf[1],buf[2],buf[3]);
    long int n = unpackInteger(buf);
    printf("%ld",n);
    return 0;
}

if someone on 64 bit system is it working or noT ?

version 2

void packInteger(unsigned char *buf,long int i)
{
unsigned long int j = i; // this will convert to 2's complement
*buf++ = i>>24;
*buf++ = i>>16;
*buf++ = i>>8;
*buf++ = i;
}
share|improve this question
    
You can edit your question. So you can put your comment into the question. –  Mysticial Sep 25 '11 at 8:04
    
Can't you use the htonl and ntohl functions? Also: stackoverflow.com/questions/105252/… –  Mat Sep 25 '11 at 8:08
    
@Mat I need to do it manually so.. –  cap10ibrahim Sep 25 '11 at 8:22
    
@Mysticial done . if you have 64 bit system is it acting as expected ? –  cap10ibrahim Sep 25 '11 at 8:22
    
@cap10Ibrahim: then look at the question I linked. –  Mat Sep 25 '11 at 8:31

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You should be using unsigned char for your buffers.

A cast to unsigned in C performs the mathematical equivalent of a conversion to 2s complement, so your pack function can be simplified:

void packInteger(unsigned char *buf, long int i)
{
    unsigned long u = i;

    buf[0] = (u >> 24) & 0xffUL;
    buf[1] = (u >> 16) & 0xffUL;
    buf[2] = (u >> 8) & 0xffUL;
    buf[3] = u & 0xffUL;
}

Your unpack function seems fine (with the change to unsigned char).

share|improve this answer
    
The constants don't need to be UL unless you do shifting on the constants themselves. They'll be promoted to unsigned long when given as operands to & by the "usual arithmetic conversions". –  Dietrich Epp Sep 25 '11 at 11:09
    
@DietrichEpp: True - I didn't mean to imply it was a correctness issue, so I've removed that text. –  caf Sep 25 '11 at 12:08
    
@DietrichEpp thanks for the tip on casting , but why &0xffUL check my new function i'll add it to the original post –  cap10ibrahim Sep 25 '11 at 18:24
    
@cap10Ibrahim: The & 0xffUL accounts for the case where unsigned char is wider than 8 bits - on common systems it will be entirely optimised out. Note that you do need to use long and unsigned long, because plain int is not necessarily any bigger than 16 bits, whereas long is guaranteed to be at least 32 bits. The code will still work fine where long is wider than that. –  caf Sep 26 '11 at 3:46
    
@caf is short int guaranteed to be 16 bits ? –  cap10ibrahim Sep 26 '11 at 13:48

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