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Actually I am new in this topic so required some help.

I have added connection string in Web.Config

    <connectionStrings>
    <add name="LocalSqlServer" connectionString="data source=.\SQLEXPRESS;Integrated Security=SSPI;AttachDBFilename=|DataDirectory|aspnetdb.mdf;User Instance=true" providerName="System.Data.SqlClient"/>
    </connectionStrings>

and know that, to use it I have to put this statement in my C# code behind

string connStr = ConfigurationManager.ConnectionStrings["LocalSqlServer"].ConnectionString;

That's all I know.

My Question is

What should I do if I want to execute some query for my aspnetdb.mdf dataabase (Built in db of ASP.NET built in login contols in Visual Studio 2010)

Earlier, I was doing this to accomplish my task
1) No connection string in Web.Config. and
2) Hard code in codebehind

SqlConnection con = new SqlConnection("data source=.\\SQLEXPRESS;Integrated Security=SSPI;AttachDBFilename=|DataDirectory|aspnetdb.mdf;User Instance=true");
SqlCommand cmd = new SqlCommand();

protected void btnnameedit_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        try
        {
            con.Open();
            cmd.CommandText = "update tamhankarnikhil set fname = '" + fname.Text + "'";
            cmd.Connection = con;
            cmd.ExecuteNonQuery();
            con.Close();
            fname.Text = "";
        }

        catch (Exception a)
        {
              Response.Write(a.Message);
        }
    }
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Here's what you could do:

protected void btnnameedit_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    try
    {
        string connStr = ConfigurationManager.ConnectionStrings["LocalSqlServer"].ConnectionString;
        using (var conn = new SqlConnection(connStr))
        using (var cmd = conn.CreateCommand())
        {
            conn.Open();
            cmd.CommandText = "UPDATE tamhankarnikhil SET fname = @fname";
            cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@fname", fname.Text); 
            cmd.ExecuteNonQuery();
            fname.Text = "";
        }
    }
    catch (Exception a)
    {
        Response.Write(a.Message);
    }
}

You will notice the usage of parametrized queries to avoid SQL injection to which your code was vulnerable to due to the string concatenations you were using when constructing the SQL query.

You will also notice that the SqlConnection and SqlCommand are wrapped in using statements to ensure their proper disposal even in the event of an exception.

share|improve this answer
    
There should be conn instead of con...right? –  Nikhil Tamhankar Sep 27 '11 at 13:56
    
cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@fname", fname.Text); is not working –  Nikhil Tamhankar Oct 6 '11 at 7:51
    
fixed con typo. fname.Text is where he set the value for the @fname parameter in the SQL statement. Replace fname.Text with the source value in your application. –  Greg Bray Aug 9 '13 at 14:58

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