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I'm new to C#, have looked at numerous posts but am still confused.

I have a array list:

List<Array> moves = new List<Array>();

I'm adding moves to it using the following:

string[] newmove = { piece, axis.ToString(), direction.ToString() };
moves.Add(newmove);

And now I wish to remove duplicates using the following:

moves = moves.Distinct();

However it's not letting me do it. I get this error:

Cannot implicitly convert type 'System.Collections.Generic.IEnumerable' to 'System.Collections.Generic.List'. An explicit conversion exists (are you missing a cast?)

Help please? I'd be so grateful.

Steve

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4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your code has two errors. The first is the missing call to ToList, as already pointed out. The second is subtle. Unique compares objects by identity, but your duplicate list items have are different array instances.

There are multiple solutions for that problem.

  • Use a custom equality comparer in moves.Distinct().ToList(). No further changes necessary.

    Sample implementation:

    class ArrayEqualityComparer<T> : EqualityComparer<T> {
        public override bool Equals(T[] x, T[] y) {
            if ( x == null ) return y == null;
            else if ( y == null ) return false;
            return x.SequenceEquals(y);
        }
        public override int GetHashCode(T[] obj) {
            if ( obj == null) return 0;
            return obj.Aggregate(0, (hash, x) => hash ^ x.GetHashCode());
        }
    }
    

    Filtering for unique items:

    moves = moves.Distinct(new ArrayEqualityComparer<string>()).ToList();
    
  • Use Tuple<string,string,string> instead of string[]. Tuple offers built-in structural equality and comparison. This variant might make your code cluttered because of the long type name.

    Instantiation:

    List<Tuple<string, string, string>> moves = 
        new List<Tuple<string, string, string>>();
    

    Adding new moves:

    Tuple<string, string, string> newmove = 
        Tuple.Create(piece, axis.ToString(), direction.ToString()); 
    moves.Add(newmove);
    

    Filtering for unique items:

    moves = moves.Distinct().ToList();
    
  • Use a custom class to hold your three values. I'd actually recommend this variant, because it makes all your code dealing with moves much more readable.

    Sample implementation:

    class Move {
    
        public Move(string piece, string axis, string direction) {
            Piece = piece;
            Axis = axis;
            Direction = direction;
        }
    
        string Piece { get; private set; }
        string Axis { get; private set; }
        string Direction { get; private set; }
    
        public override Equals(object obj) {
            Move other = obj as Move;
            if ( other != null ) 
                return Piece == other.Piece && 
                       Axis == other.Axis && 
                       Direction == other.Direction;
            return false;
        }
    
        public override GetHashCode() {
            return Piece.GetHashCode() ^ 
                   Axis.GetHashCode() ^ 
                   Direction.GetHashCode();
        }
    
        // TODO: override ToString() as well
    }
    

    Instantiation:

    List<Move> moves = new List<Move>();
    

    Adding new moves:

    Move newmove = new Move(piece, axis.ToString(), direction.ToString()); 
    moves.Add(newmove);
    

    Filtering for unique items:

    moves = moves.Distinct().ToList();
    
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That's really helpful. Many thanks! will go for the class as advised. Thanks again. –  Steve Gore Sep 25 '11 at 12:05
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You need to call .ToList() after the .Distinct method as it returns IEnumerable<T>. I would also recommend you using a strongly typed List<string[]> instead of List<Array>:

List<string[]> moves = new List<string[]>();
string[] newmove = { piece, axis.ToString(), direction.ToString() };
moves.Add(newmove);
moves.Add(newmove);

moves = moves.Distinct().ToList();
// At this stage moves.Count = 1
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Thanks, changed to the strongly typed List<string[]>. Unfortunately it's not removing duplicates at all, even though I no longer get the error message. –  Steve Gore Sep 25 '11 at 9:30
    
@Steve G, maybe because there aren't duplicates? When I tested this code with hardcoded values, inserted twice the same array, the Distinct method removed the duplicate. –  Darin Dimitrov Sep 25 '11 at 9:32
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The compiler error is because you need to convert the result to a list:

moves = moves.Distinct().ToList();

However it probably won't work as you want, because arrays don't have Equals defined in the way that you are hoping (it compares the references of the array objects, not the values inside the array). Instead of using an array, create a class to hold your data and define Equals and GetHashCode to compare the values.

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Indeed, it doesn't do quite what I wanted it to. How is comparing the reference of the array objects useful? I'll try and do as you suggested and define Equals. –  Steve Gore Sep 25 '11 at 9:32
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Old question, but this is an O(n) solution using O(1) additional space:

public static void RemoveDuplicates(string[] array)
    {
        int c = 0;
        int i = -1;

        for (int n = 1; n < array.Length; n++)
        {
            if (array[c] == array[n])
            {
                if (i == -1)
                {
                    i = n;
                }
            }
            else
            {
                if (i == -1)
                {
                    c++;
                }
                else
                {
                    array[i] = array[n];
                    c++;
                    i++;
                }
            }
        }
    }
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