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For example, I want to remove unwanted line with bbbb

aaaa
bbbb
cccc
dddd

I use the following perl regular expression to accomplish this.

$_ =~ s/bbbb//g;

The problem here is that a blank line is stays, for example

aaaa

cccc
dddd

I need to remove the unwanted text line and also the blank line.

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Do you have the whole data in $_ or are you somehow loop & printing? –  Mat Sep 25 '11 at 12:02
    
line by line, I don't have the whole data in $_, just line by line –  Bruc Walker Sep 25 '11 at 12:03
    
then why not just stop printing empty lines? Am I missing something? –  Mat Sep 25 '11 at 12:04

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You could simply include the newline in your regular expression:

$_ =~ s/bbbb\n//g;

This will result in:

aaaa
cccc
dddd
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Perfect, thanks Larsks –  Bruc Walker Sep 25 '11 at 12:05
    
In fact, it worked out just fine. I tested before posting; please do the same. perl -p -e 's/bbbb\n//g' < input yields exactly the output above given exactly the input above. –  larsks Sep 25 '11 at 12:29
    
@larsks, indeed it does work. i edited my answer to remove the nonsense. and removed my comment. –  Lucas Sep 25 '11 at 12:56

It seems to me that if you are reading this line by line you could just have your loop do this:

my @foo = (
    "aaaa\n",
    "bbbb\n",
    "cccc\n",
    "dddd\n" );

foreach my $line ( @foo ) {
    next if ( $line =~ /^bbbb$/ );

    # now do something with a valid line;
}
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