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I have problem with mutexes I have this code and I dont any idea why it doesn't work correctly...

#include <windows.h>
#include <process.h>
#include <stdio.h>
HANDLE mutex;
unsigned _stdcall t(void*){
printf(":D:D:D\n");
return NULL;
}
int main(){
mutex=CreateMutex(NULL,FALSE,NULL);
WaitForSingleObject(mutex,INFINITE);
_beginthreadex(NULL,NULL,&t,NULL,0,NULL);
WaitForSingleObject(mutex,INFINITE);
printf("HD\n");
}

the result is :

HD
:D:D:D

I expect not to see HD in console.....

but this code work correctly

HANDLE mutex;
unsigned _stdcall t(void*){
WaitForSingleObject(mutex,INFINITE);
printf(":D:D:D\n");
ReleaseMutex(mutex);
return NULL;
}
int main(){
mutex=CreateMutex(NULL,FALSE,NULL);
WaitForSingleObject(mutex,INFINITE);
_beginthreadex(NULL,NULL,&t,NULL,0,NULL);
printf("HD\n");
while(1){
}

} 

the result is:

HD

Thank you everyone....

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4  
Please always check the return value of WaitForSingleObject and other core functions. You'll never be able to debug your own code if you don't. –  Mat Sep 25 '11 at 12:50
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3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

As per MSDN:

The thread that owns a mutex can specify the same mutex in repeated wait function calls without blocking its execution.

Thus in your first sample, the second call to WaitForSingleObject() doesn't block the main thread as it is the thread that owns the mutex.

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do have any suggestion that can work in this case?I mean example one... –  pooya Sep 25 '11 at 12:57
    
@pooya: What do you want to achieve? If it's just not printing HD i'd simply not print it - you already know that you own the mutex (given proper return value checks). –  Georg Fritzsche Sep 25 '11 at 13:11
    
I want to use this mutexes in a opengl program... –  pooya Sep 25 '11 at 13:18
    
I have two thread that one of them declare mode of rendering object and the other one render it... –  pooya Sep 25 '11 at 13:20
    
i use this pattern: display(){ wait(mutex1); signal(mutex2) } mode(){ wait(mutex2); signal(mutex1); } –  pooya Sep 25 '11 at 13:21
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It looks like you want the main thread to take the mutex on behalf of the secondary thread. Mutexes are tracked by thread, so you cannot take a mutex on behalf of somebody else. You might want to switch to a semaphore, which does not have owner tracking.

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You used the mutex improperly: when you wait for a mutex you block until somebody else will release it.

The thread procedure must do its own lock/unlock (WaitForSingleObject and ReleaseMutex, in windows) as well as the main thread. The purpose is avoid that one thread interleave the output with another.

If you want to "join" a thread (do something after its termination) you can wait for it as well.

HANDLE mutex;

unsigned _stdcall t(void*)
{
    WaitForSingleObject(mutex,INFINITE);
    printf(":D:D:D\n");
    ReleaseMutex(mutex);
    return NULL;
}

int main()
{
    mutex=CreateMutex(NULL,FALSE,NULL);
    _beginthreadex(NULL,NULL,&t,NULL,0,NULL);
    Sleep(0);
    WaitForSingleObject(mutex,INFINITE);
    printf("HD\n");
    ReleaseMutex(mutex);
} 

Also: don't use infinite loops to stuck a thread (while(1) ...), use Sleep instead.

Note also that -in general- you cannot predict what thread will printf first. That's what concurrency is for: the threads compete each other running in parallel. The mutex avoid them to output together, but what sequence will result depends also on what else the system is doing while running your program.

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