Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is there a way to dynamically expand an scipy array

from scipy import sci
time = sci.zeros((n,1), 'double')

Can we increase the size of time array after this?

share|improve this question
    
sci is not standard, explain it –  David Heffernan Sep 25 '11 at 14:33

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

It's possible to expand arrays using the resize method, but it can be a slow operation for large arrays, so avoid it if possible*.

For example:

import scipy as sci
n=3
time = sci.zeros((n,1), 'double')
print(time)
# [[ 0.]
#  [ 0.]
#  [ 0.]]

time.resize((n+1,2))
print(time)
# [[ 0.  0.]
#  [ 0.  0.]
#  [ 0.  0.]
#  [ 0.  0.]]

* Instead, figure out how large an array you need from the beginning, and allocate that shape for time only once. In general it is faster to over-allocate than it is to resize.

share|improve this answer
    
So, the problem is that I don't know the size of the array, that I want, in advance. So, I iterate over and increase the size of the array one at a time. Like this n = 1 time = sci.zeros((1,1), 'double') and for (i in something): time.resize((n+1), 'double') What would scipy lib do, would it just copy the previous elements of the array at a new place, because that would be slow. –  Harman Sep 25 '11 at 14:50
2  
I would append data to a normal Python list, (or list of lists), and then convert it to a numpy array with time=np.array(time) after the size is fixed. –  unutbu Sep 25 '11 at 14:56

The resulting time array being just a Numpy Array, you can use standard Numpy methods for manipulating them, such as numpy#insert which returns a modified array with new elements inserted into it. Examples usage, from Numpy docs (here np is short for numpy) :

>>> a = np.array([[1, 1], [2, 2], [3, 3]])
>>> a
    array([[1, 1],
           [2, 2],
           [3, 3]])
>>> np.insert(a, 1, 5)
    array([1, 5, 1, 2, 2, 3, 3])
>>> np.insert(a, 1, 5, axis=1)
    array([[1, 5, 1],
           [2, 5, 2],
           [3, 5, 3]])

Also, numpy#insert is faster than numpy#resize :

>>> timeit np.insert(time, 1, 1, 1)
    100000 loops, best of 3: 16.7 us per loop

>>> timeit np.resize(time, (20,1))
    10000 loops, best of 3: 27.1 us per loop
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.