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In an Edit action in ASP.NET MVC, certain fields can be hidden from user with HiddenFieldFor. However this doesn't protect the fields (such as ID, data creation date) from being edited.

For example, a model Student has fields Id, Name and Birthday. I like to allow users to update the Name, but not Id nor Birthday.

For an Edit action like this

public ActionResult Edit(Student student)
{
    if (ModelState.IsValid)
    {
        db.Entry(student).State = EntityState.Modified;
        db.SaveChanges();
        return RedirectToAction("Index");
    }
    return View(student);
}

How can I prevent Id and Birthday from being edited? Thanks!

share|improve this question
up vote 7 down vote accepted

You should use a view model which contains only the properties that you want to be edited:

public class EditStudentViewModel
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
}

and then:

public ActionResult Edit(StudentViewModel student)
{
    ...
}

Another technique which I don't recommend is to exclude certain properties from binding:

public ActionResult Edit([Bind(Exclude = "Id,Birthday")]Student student)
{
    ...
}

or include:

public ActionResult Edit([Bind(Include = "Name")]Student student)
{
    ...
}
share|improve this answer
    
How come I forgot View Model. What are you saying is that I should have a view model based on the Student model, and use that in the Edit view/action? – Jim Sep 25 '11 at 15:39
2  
@Jim, yeah, how could you? Really. The most fundamental notion in ASP.NET MVC that solves all problems :-) Yes, you should have a view model which is specifically designed for the Edit action. It should contain only the properties that you are interested into. Then you should map between the view model and the model model to perform the update. AutoMapper is a really great tool for this job. – Darin Dimitrov Sep 25 '11 at 15:40
    
Thanks! I will check out AutoMapper. Why you don't recommend excluding certain properties? – Jim Sep 25 '11 at 16:30
2  
@Jim, because tomorrow you (or some other developer on the team) will add a new property to the domain model and will forget to add it to the controller action's [Bind] attribute and you will get very bad surprises. It's called mass assignment attack and it basically sets fields in your database that are never supposed to be set. Just think of the consequences if there was an IsAdmin field to your domain model => catastrophic. Suffice to forge an HTTP request with the IsAdmin=true in it and the student will become administrator. – Darin Dimitrov Sep 25 '11 at 16:31
1  
Thanks for your detailed answer. I ended up making my own mapping between model and view model. – Jim Sep 25 '11 at 17:05

I assume you have to have the properties in your Model so that in View you can use them to render useful information e.g. an ActionLink with ID or some readonly Text.

In this case you can define your model with an explicit binding:

[Bind(Include = "Name")]
public class Student
{
    int Id { get; set; }
    int Name { get; set; }
    DateTime Birthday { get; set; }
}

This way when updating your model, if the user submits an extra Id it will not be bound.

Another idea I like is having your model know its bindings per scenario and have them compiler validated:

public class ModelExpression<T>
{
    public string GetExpressionText<TResult>(Expression<Func<T, TResult>> expression)
    {
        return ExpressionHelper.GetExpressionText(expression);
    }
}

public class Student
{
    public static string[] EditBinding = GetEditBinding().ToArray();

    int Id { get; set; }
    int Name { get; set; }
    DateTime Birthday { get; set; }

    static IEnumerable<string> GetEditBinding()
    {
        ModelExpression<Student> modelExpression = new ModelExpression<Student>();
        yield return modelExpression.GetExpressionText(s => s.Name);
    }
}

This way in your Action when calling TryUpdateModel you can pass this information.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the answer. Voted up =) – Jim Sep 25 '11 at 17:07

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