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In the past I have put a lock around accessing the HttpRuntime.Cache mechanism. I'm not sure if I had really researched the issue in the past and blindy surrounded it with a lock.

Do you think this is really necessary?

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stackoverflow.com/questions/447705/… seems that the cache is thread safe –  Andrew Harry Apr 16 '09 at 3:34
    
language/platform? –  Javier Apr 16 '09 at 3:35

4 Answers 4

This article suggests a lock should be used:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/cc500561.aspx

Quote:

The problem is that if you've got a query that takes 30 seconds and you're executing the page every second, in the time it takes to populate the cache item, 29 other requests will come in, all of which will attempt to populate the cache item with their own queries to the database. To solve this problem, you can add a thread lock to stop the other page executions from requesting the data from the database.

Here is their code snippet:

// check for cached results
object cachedResults = ctx.Cache["PersonList"];
ArrayList results = new ArrayList();

if  (cachedResults == null)
{
  // lock this section of the code
  // while we populate the list
  lock(lockObject)
  {
    // only populate if list was not populated by
    // another thread while this thread was waiting
    if (cachedResults == null)
    {
      ...
    }
  }
}

I haven't tested this code, but I would be very interested to hear someone who has evaluated this approach in a production environment.

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10  
I don't think that this is necessary in terms of the caching thread-safety - it's more to prevent multiple accesses to the database to run a potentially expensive query. –  zcrar70 Mar 26 '10 at 19:39
1  
I agree with you. –  frankadelic Mar 29 '10 at 20:09
3  
Just a small but important gotcha in the example: between the lock(lockObject) and the if (cachedResults == null), the cached item should be retrieved again. See this stackoverflow.com/questions/39112/… for a proper example. –  Ciprian Dec 10 '12 at 17:14

According to this documentation http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.web.caching.cache(VS.80).aspx access to the cache object is thread safe. As for the object(s) you store in the cache thread safety has to come from somewhere else.

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I don't think it's necessary to wrap access to the HttpRuntime.Cache property with a lock, as the .Cache property is static and also thread-safe.

There are many different ways of accessing the Cache object (HttpRuntime.Cache, HttpContext.Current.Cache, Page.Cache etc.). They all access the same Cache object, as there's only one Cache object per Application Domain, as it's effectively a thread-safe Singleton object.

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I don't think locking is the answer to the issue below, especially in the production environment, where you have several servers running your application.

The problem is that if you've got a query that takes 30 seconds and you're executing the page every second, in the time it takes to populate the cache item, 29 other requests will come in, all of which will attempt to populate the cache item with their own queries to the database. To solve this problem, you can add a thread lock to stop the other page executions from requesting the data from the database.

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