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I've discovered a strange behavior for mutable sets which I cannot understand:

I have a object which I want to add to a set. The equals method for the class is overridden. When I add two different objects to the set, which produces the same output for equals method, I get a different behavior between mutable and immutable sets for the contains method.

Here is the code snippet:

class Test(text:String){
  override def equals(obj:Any) = obj match {
    case t: Test => if (t.text == this.text) true else false
    case _ => false
  }
  override def toString = text
}

val mutableSet:scala.collection.mutable.Set[Test] = scala.collection.mutable.Set.empty
mutableSet += new Test("test")
println(mutableSet)
println(mutableSet.contains(new Test("test")))

val immutableSet:scala.collection.immutable.Set[Test] = scala.collection.immutable.Set.empty
immutableSet += new Test("test")
println(immutableSet)
println(immutableSet.contains(new Test("test")))

This produces as output:

Set(test)
false
Set(test)
true

In my opinion both calls of contains should produce the same output (true).

Could anybody help me to understand the difference here or is this a bug in the scala immutable set implementation? By the way, I use scala 2.8.1.final

Thanks.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 22 down vote accepted

Rule 1 when implementing equals(): Implement hashCode() at the same time. See Overriding equals and hashCode in Java

In the first example, you're creating a mutable set, which calls hashCode to set up the hash table.

In the second, you're using an immutable set with one entry, so Scala actually uses an optimised version of Set called Set1. Set1.contains() just compares the one entry with the passed element using equals() directly. This looks like:

/** An optimized representation for immutable sets of size 1 */
@SerialVersionUID(1233385750652442003L)
class Set1[A] private[collection] (elem1: A) extends Set[A] with Serializable {
  override def size: Int = 1
  def contains(elem: A): Boolean = 
    elem == elem1
  def + (elem: A): Set[A] = 
    if (contains(elem)) this
    else new Set2(elem1, elem)
  def - (elem: A): Set[A] = 
    if (elem == elem1) Set.empty
    else this
  def iterator: Iterator[A] = 
    Iterator(elem1)
  override def foreach[U](f: A =>  U): Unit = {
    f(elem1)
  }
}

No hashCode is called. There is also a Set2, Set3 and Set4.

So if we change your code to be:

class Test(val text:String){
  override def equals(obj:Any) = {
  println("equals=" + obj)
  obj match {
    case t: Test => if (t.text == this.text) true else false
    case _ => false
  }}

  override def hashCode(): Int = {
    println("hashCode=" + super.hashCode())
    super.hashCode()
  }
  override def toString = text
}

println("mutable")
val mutableSet:scala.collection.mutable.Set[Test] = scala.collection.mutable.Set.empty
mutableSet += new Test("test")
println("mutableSet=" + mutableSet + " contains=" + mutableSet.contains(new Test("test")))

println("immutable")
var immutableSet:scala.collection.immutable.Set[Test] = scala.collection.immutable.Set.empty
immutableSet += new Test("test")
println("immutableSet=" + immutableSet + " contains=" + immutableSet.contains(new Test("test")))

adding a hashCode and a println in the equals, and the output is:

mutable
hashCode=30936685
hashCode=26956691
mutableSet=Set(test) contains=false
immutable
equals=test
immutableSet=Set(test) contains=true

which explains why the mutable.contains() isn't working correctly. It is looking up the object in the wrong hash table entry, equals() doesn't even get called. And, unsurprisingly, it doesn't find it.

You can implement hashCode using text.hashCode:

override def hashCode: Int = text.hashCode
share|improve this answer
    
Exactly as Matthew says :-) –  Alan Burlison Sep 25 '11 at 19:19
    
Thank you, I have not recognized, that there are special cases for immutable sets of size 1. –  Stefan Sep 25 '11 at 19:29

You need to override hashCode as well. hashCode is essential to override when you override equals.

Note there were also a few things that didn't compile, so I edited a bit more:

class Test(val text:String){ // added val
  override def equals(obj:Any) = obj match {
    case t: Test => if (t.text == this.text) true else false
    case _ => false
  }
  override def toString = text
  override def hashCode = text.hashCode
}

val mutableSet:scala.collection.mutable.Set[Test] = scala.collection.mutable.Set.empty
mutableSet += new Test("test")
println(mutableSet)
println(mutableSet.contains(new Test("test")))

val immutableSet:scala.collection.immutable.Set[Test] = scala.collection.immutable.Set.empty
val immutableSet2 = immutableSet + new Test("test") // reassignment to val
println(immutableSet2)
println(immutableSet2.contains(new Test("test")))

I recommend reading http://www.artima.com/pins1ed/object-equality.html for a lot more insights on doing object equality. It's eye opening.

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry for the syntax errors. Next time I would look twice. –  Stefan Sep 25 '11 at 19:30
    
The code you provided above works fine. The reason for the "strange" behavior is as Matthew says. –  Stefan Sep 25 '11 at 19:32

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