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I'm wondering if this can be done using Doctrine annotations:

Say you have a parent class (a mapped superclass):

abstract class AbstractParent {
    protected $foo;
}

which as two child classes:

class ConcreteChild1 extends AbstractParent {
    /**
     * @OneToOne(targetEntity="SomeEntity")
     */
    // How can I map this to foo above?
}

class ConcreteChild2 extends AbstractParent {
    /**
     * @OneToOne(targetEntity="SomeOtherEntity")
     */
    // How can I map this to foo above?
}

SomeEntity and SomeOtherEntity both share the same parent interface (SomeEntityInterface) but I don't want to just map the $foo field on the mapped superclass AbstractParent to this parent interface (SomeEntityInterface) as doctrine incurs a performance overhead (it loses lazy loading for mapping a class high in a hierarchy) (i.e. I don't want to use Single Table or Class Table Inheritance).

With YML the solution is simple as you can still map foo even though its on a parent class:

ConcreteChild1:
type: entity
oneToOne:
  foo:
    targetEntity: SomeEntity

and

ConcreteChild2:
type: entity
oneToOne:
  foo:
    targetEntity: SomeOtherEntity

So must I use YML or is there something I'm missing that would allow me to map $foo through an annotation?

Thanks greatly in advance, I know this is a bit of a hard one to follow!

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1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Well, it depends. Do you do what you're doing in YML with annotations, you'd just define $foo in each concrete class and annotate it there, just like you do in your YML.

If $foo always pointed to the same type of entity, you could use @MappedSuperclass on your your abstract base class, and then you define the relationship there.

That can also work if SomeEntity and SomeOtherEntity were both subclasses of SomeCommonFooAncestor, in which case you could use @MappedSuperclass and say that AbstractParent has a @OneToOne(targetEntity="SomeCommonFooAncestor"). However, there are serious performance considerations with that approach for @OneToOne and @ManyToOne relationships (but you might be okay with that)

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Redeclaration of the field, interesting. In my example above the class AbstractParent does actually use $foo in some of its methods, from a domain model stand point there's not much reason to re-declare a protected field in a child class so I've never tried it... I'll give it a shot and see if PHP allows it. The performance impact of just doing STI or CTI is unacceptable as $foo is actually an ArrayCollection association. If this doesn't work with annotations I'll just chalk it up to the YML allowing it because its more decoupled. Thank you for your reply! –  Kasheen Sep 26 '11 at 8:45
    
Just implemented the solution whereby I re-declare $foo in the child classes and give the field its specific annotations with regards to the entity type they point to - seems to work fine! I think I get the best of most worlds now being able to re-use my abstract class logic while not incurring the Doctrine overheads from having a superclass as the entity type on $foo. I wouldn't have minded YML since it's more decoupled but I think I prefer not having to change between implementation and meta files constantly. Thanks again for your help timdev! –  Kasheen Sep 26 '11 at 13:46
    
No problem. It would be inappropriate to redeclare it twice if were the same type, but the fact that it references different entities means it's really two different things. If the two entities have a common ancestor, you'd ideally want a single foo in the abstract parent that was of that ancestor type. –  timdev Sep 26 '11 at 17:26

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