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I’ve looked all over the SQLAlchemy tutorial and other similar questions but I seem to be struggling to get this join to work:

The scenario: I have a pages table represented by the Page model. Pages can be created by an user and edited by an user, but not necessarily the same one. My Page model looks like this (abridged):

class Page(Base):
    __tablename__ = 'pages'

    id = Column(Integer, primary_key = True)
    slug = Column(Text)
    title = Column(Text)
    direct_link = Column(Text)
    body = Column(Text)
    category_id = Column(Integer, ForeignKey('categories.id'))
    published_on = Column(DateTime)
    publishing_user_id = Column(Integer, ForeignKey('users.id'))
    last_edit_on = Column(DateTime)
    last_edit_user_id = Column(Integer, ForeignKey('users.id'))

    # Define relationships
    publish_user = relationship('User', backref = backref('pages', order_by = id), primaryjoin = "Page.publishing_user_id == User.id")
    edit_user = relationship('User', primaryjoin = "Page.last_edit_user_id == User.id")
    category = relationship('Category', backref = backref('pages', order_by = id))

My users are stored in the users table represented by the User model. As I said I’ve been all over the SQLAlchemy docs looking for this, I’ve tried to make it look as similar to their example as possible, but no to no avail. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

share|improve this question
    
Im not sure ive set it up right for what i want it to do. I want to be able to get a page from a query, and call page.publish_user to get the publishing user. Ive tried the suggestion below, but still no luck –  richzilla Sep 25 '11 at 20:50
    
You say it's not working, but can you be more specific -- an error, an unexpected return value, what? I don't see any obvious problems in the code you've posted. –  FMc Sep 25 '11 at 20:55

2 Answers 2

I think you almost got it right; only instead of Model names you should use Table names when defining primaryjoin. So instead of

# Define relationships
publish_user = relationship('User', backref = backref('pages', order_by = id), 
    primaryjoin = "Page.publishing_user_id == User.id")
edit_user = relationship('User', 
    primaryjoin = "Page.last_edit_user_id == User.id")

use:

# Define relationships
publish_user = relationship('User', backref = backref('pages', order_by = id), 
    primaryjoin = "pages.publishing_user_id == users.id")
edit_user = relationship('User', 
    primaryjoin = "pages.last_edit_user_id == users.id")
share|improve this answer

Try foreign_keys option:

publish_user = relationship(User, foreign_keys=publishing_user_id,
                                  primaryjoin=publishing_user_id == User.id,
                                  backref=backref('pages', order_by=id))
edit_user = relationship(User, foreign_keys=last_edit_user_id,
                               primaryjoin=last_edit_user_id == User.id)
share|improve this answer
    
When you add foreign_keys and join condition is deducible, there is no need to add primaryjoin attributes. –  user2683246 Apr 1 at 13:27

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