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In trying to design a collision detection component for a game, I came up with the following solution. I define an interface ICollideable that looks something like:

interface ICollideable
{
    Sprite Sprite { get; }
    int    Damage { get; }

    void HandleCollision(ICollideable collidedWith);
}

Basically, any game objects that want to participate in collision detection have to implement this interface, then register themselves with the detector, which maintains a list of ICollideables. When it detects a collision, it calls the HandleCollision method on the object and passes in a reference to the object it collided with.

I like this, because it lets me keep all my collision algorithms in one place, and lets the game objects themselves decide how to handle the collision. But because of the latter, I find I am having to check the underlying object type. For example, I don't want Players to collide with each other, so in the Player class there might be something like:

void HandleCollision(ICollideable collidedWith)
{
    if (!(collidedWith is Player)) { // do stuff }
}

and so on, and I am wondering if this is telling me that I have a bad design and what the alternatives might be.

Second question, further along the lines of the first. For scoring purposes, if an Enemy is destroyed by a Projectile, someone needs to know the "Owning Player" member of the Projectile class. However, none of my other collideables have or need this property, so I find myself wanting to do (in the Enemy HandleCollision):

void HandleCollision(ICollideable collidedWith)
{
    if (collidedWith is Projectile) {
        Health -= collidedWith.Damage;

        if (Health <= 0) {
            Player whoDestroyedMe = (collidedWith as Projectile).FiredBy
            // ...
        }
    }
}

I haven't a clue as to how to handle this with a better design. Any insights would be appreciated.

EDIT: I wanted to pull focus towards the second question, because my gut tells me a way of handling this will solve the first question. As for the first question, I thought of a way to abstract this behavior. I could define an enum:

enum Team
{
    Player,
    Enemy,
    Neither
}

and have ICollideables implement this property. Then the collision detector simply doesn't register collisions between collideables on the same "Team". So, Player and Player Projectiles would be on one team, Enemy and Enemy Projectiles on the other, and the environment (which can damage both) can be on neither. It doesn't have to be an enum, could be an int or a string or anything, with the idea that objects with the same value for this property do not collide with each other.

I like this idea of modeling behavior with a simple attribute. For instance, if I want to turn "allow friendly fire" on, all I have to do is create Projectiles with a Team value other than the Player's Team value. However, I still may have cases where this is not enough. For example, a Player may have shields that are temporarily impervious to projectiles but will not protect against a direct collision with an enemy, and so on.

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5  
Try the visitor pattern. –  SLaks Sep 25 '11 at 19:40
9  
To expand on SLaks' comment: what you want to do is a double dispatch. Normally a virtual method dispatches based on the runtime type of the receiver, but you need to dispatch based on both the runtime type of the receiver and the argument. The visitor pattern is a standard way to do double dispatch in a single dispatch language. In C# 4 you can also use "dynamic" to get fully dynamic dispatch, but there is a performance cost to that. –  Eric Lippert Sep 25 '11 at 19:55
    
@EricLippert - A code sketch implementing this pattern in the current context would be much appreciated. –  idlewire Sep 25 '11 at 21:40
    
@idlewire - Googled 'visitor pattern and games' for you. wiki.ahnfelt.dk/DoubleDispatch.html –  Ritch Melton Sep 26 '11 at 0:17
    
@RitchMelton Looking at that example, I would hate to have to enforce, through the interface, implementations of HandleCollision with each game type as parameter. I am trying to keep the collision detector and ICollideable interface in an "Engine" core, without any game-specific details inside of it. –  idlewire Sep 26 '11 at 2:09

4 Answers 4

I think you're going the wrong way altogether in handling the collision inside of the class of one of the colliders. I would put this logic into a third object, outside of the entity objects. You could do all of the checking of the types in this third object, and even handle most of the logic there too. Why should a Ship or a Projectile have a monopoly over the logic that happens when one hits the other?

The following is how I might handle this, although it means using an object for each style of collision (Ship vs Ship, Ship vs Projectile, Ship vs Asteroid, etc.) You might be more comfortable putting all that logic into a single object, or even a single method on that object.

public interface ICollisionHandler
{
    bool HandleCollision(Entity first, Entity second);
}

public class PlayerShipVsProjectile : ICollisionHandler
{
    private GameOptions options;
    public PlayersOwnShipHandler(GameOptions options)
    {
        this.options = options;
    }

    public bool HandleCollision(Entity first, Entity second)
    {
        // Exactly how you go about doing this line, whether using the object types
        // or using a Type property, or some other method, is not really that important.
        // You have so much more important things to worry about than these little
        // code design details.
        if ((!first is Ship) || (!second is Projectile)) return false;
        Ship ship = (Ship)first;
        Projectile projectile = (Projectile)second;

        // Because we've decided to put this logic in it's own class, we can easily
        // use a constructor parameter to get access to the game options. Here, we
        // can have access to whether friendly fire is turned on or not.
        if (ship.Owner.IsFriendlyWith(projectile.Shooter) &&
              !this.options.FriendlyFire) {
            return false;
        }

        if (!ship.InvulnerableTypes.Contains(InvulnerableTypes.PROJECTILE))
        {
             ship.DoDamage(projectile.Damage);
        }

        return true;
    }
}

Like this, you can then do...

// Somewhere in the setup...
CollisionMapper mapper = new CollisionMapper();
mapper.AddHandler(new ShipVsProjectile(gameOptions));
mapper.AddHandler(new ShipVsShip(gameOptions));

// Somewhere in your collision handling...
mapper.Resolve(entityOne, entityTwo);

The implementation of CollisionMapper is left as an exercise for the reader. Remember that you might need to have Resolve call the ICollisionHandler's "Handle" method twice, with the second time reversing the entities (otherwise your collision handler objects will need to check for the reverse situation, which might be ok as well).

I feel this makes the code easier to read. A single object describes exactly what will happen when two entities collide, rather than trying to put all this info into one of the entity objects.

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One thing you misunderstood about my model is that no one has a "monopoly" on the collision. If a Player collides with an Enemy, both of their HandleCollision will be called, and the Player decides what happens to itself only in its method, and the Enemy what happens to itself. I don't see a problem with this model. –  idlewire Sep 26 '11 at 1:52
    
My gut tells me that this is a really unpleasant way to go about it. A class for each pair of interacting objects? And tell me, what does the actual collision detector code look like? Does it have to know the underlying type of each ICollisionHandler to call the appropriate object's method, or does it simply call each and every one on every collision which is why you have that first if statement? Doesn't seem like a good design. –  idlewire Sep 26 '11 at 1:57
    
The collision detection algorithm and the logic of what happens when a collision is detected are two separate ideas. One does not affect the other in this example (although in your code it might). And the creation of an outside class to store this logic can give you a situation where the Ship entity will never need to know about the Projectile entity, reducing the coupling between the two objects. –  Mark Hildreth Sep 26 '11 at 2:15
1  
With this setup, what happens when the collision detector detects a collision between ICollisionHandler object1 and ICollisionHandler object2? It either has to resolve what class's HandleCollision to call by if-ing the underlying types of those objects, or it has to call HandleCollision for every ICollisionHandler object, and let each class' method check to make sure it is relevant for the current collision. –  idlewire Sep 26 '11 at 2:23
    
You can do that either way, really. I wasn't saying that exactly HOW you call the logic outside the Entities is really important, but more that putting the logic outside the Entity has its advantages (although perhaps with my long-winded example I ended up not articulating that enough). Keep in mind this is just one solution, and if putting the logic in the Entities works for you, then that's great! But it seems to me that you are asking about "good design", which of course gets pretty opinionated, and in my opinion, the Ship object should not need to know about the Projectile object at all. –  Mark Hildreth Sep 26 '11 at 2:35

For the first case, I would add the following extra method to ICollidable:

bool CanCollideWith(ICollidable collidedWith)

As the name suggests, it would return true or false depending upon whether it can collide with the passed in object.

Your Player.HandleCollision method would just do its stuff because the calling method could do that test and not even call the method if it wasn't required.

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1  
But I would still have to do all the if (collidedWith is ...) tests inside that method, so I'm not sure how this is much better. –  idlewire Sep 25 '11 at 20:22

How about something like this?

Collidable.cs

abstract class Collidable
{
    public Sprite Sprite { get; protected set;  }
    public int Damage { get; protected set; }

    protected delegate void CollisionAction(Collidable with);

    protected Dictionary<Type, CollisionAction> collisionTypes = new Dictionary<Type, CollisionAction>();

    public void HandleCollision(Collidable with)
    {
        Type collisionTargetType = with.GetType();

        CollisionAction action;

        bool keyFound = collisionTypes.TryGetValue(collisionTargetType, out action);

        if (keyFound)
        {
            action(with);
        }
    }
}

Bullet.cs

class Bullet: Collidable
{
    public Bullet()
    {
        collisionTypes.Add(typeof(Player), HandleBulletPlayerCollision);
        collisionTypes.Add(typeof(Bullet), HandleBulletBulletCollision);
    }

    private void HandleBulletPlayerCollision(Collidable with)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Bullet collided with {0}", with.ToString());
    }

    private void HandleBulletBulletCollision(Collidable with)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Bullet collided with {0}.", with.ToString());
    }
}

Player.cs

class Player : Collidable
{
    public Player()
    {
        collisionTypes.Add(typeof(Bullet), HandlePlayerBulletCollision);
        collisionTypes.Add(typeof(Player), HandlePlayerPlayerCollision);
    }

    private void HandlePlayerBulletCollision(Collidable with)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Player collided with {0}.", with.ToString());
    }

    private void HandlePlayerPlayerCollision(Collidable with)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Player collided with {0}.", with.ToString());
    }
}
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Fragile. Requires all the derived types to know about each other. –  Ritch Melton Sep 25 '11 at 22:43
    
Ritch: I'm not sure I understand what you mean. They only need to know about each other if necessary (there is required action between the two types colliding). –  John Smith Sep 25 '11 at 22:47
    
Right. They shouldn't know about each other at all. –  Ritch Melton Sep 25 '11 at 23:58
    
@Ritch Melton: Yes, but they would have to as evidenced by the OP's post. For example, when it needs to access the other object's FiredBy property. –  John Smith Sep 26 '11 at 0:03
    
Right. What about a non-player object. Or a player's bullet. Or a wall. As the number of types that represent entities grow, so does the coupling between all of the derived types. It would be better to remove the inheritance and provide several interfaces to implement on each object. Interface implementation is what Steve Kanye's Answer suggests. –  Ritch Melton Sep 26 '11 at 0:09

I think this is a good question @idlewire and I have to say that I don't think there is anything fundamentally wrong with your original solution. In asking whether object Foo should be allowed to cast the ICollideable to a Bar, the important question is only: is undesirable to have Foo knowing anything at all about Bar? If the answer is 'no' because Foo already knows about Bars (for behaviours other than collisions, perhaps) then I see no problem in the cast and, as you say, it allows you to better encapsulate the behaviour of both.

Where you need to be wary is only where this would introduces a dependency between two things you'd like kept apart - which would make re-use of either without the other (in a different game application for example) impossible. There you might want to either have more specific sub-interfaces from ICollideable (e.g. IElastic and IInelastic), or use properties on the interface as you have proposed with the Enum.

In short, I think your original posting shows good evidence of OO thinking, not bad.

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