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How can I get a list (in the form of an NSArray or NSDictionary) of a given object attributes in Objective-C?

Imagine the following scenario: I have defined a parent class which just extends NSObject, that holds an NSString, a BOOL and an NSData object as attributes. Then I have several classes which extend this parent class, adding a lot of different attributes each.

Is there any way I could implement an instance method on the parent class that goes through the whole object and returns, say, an NSArray of each of the (child) class attributes as NSStrings that are not on the parent class, so I can later use these NSString for KVC?

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9 Answers 9

up vote 77 down vote accepted

I just managed to get the answer myself. By using the Obj-C Runtime Library, I had access to the properties the way I wanted:

- (void)myMethod {
    unsigned int outCount, i;
    objc_property_t *properties = class_copyPropertyList([self class], &outCount);
    for(i = 0; i < outCount; i++) {
        objc_property_t property = properties[i];
        const char *propName = property_getName(property);
        if(propName) {
            const char *propType = getPropertyType(property);
            NSString *propertyName = [NSString stringWithCString:propName
                                                                encoding:[NSString defaultCStringEncoding]];
            NSString *propertyType = [NSString stringWithCString:propType
                                                                encoding:[NSString defaultCStringEncoding]];
            ...
        }
    }
    free(properties);
}

This required me to make a 'getPropertyType' C function, which is mainly taken from an Apple code sample (can't remember right now the exact source):

static const char *getPropertyType(objc_property_t property) {
    const char *attributes = property_getAttributes(property);
    char buffer[1 + strlen(attributes)];
    strcpy(buffer, attributes);
    char *state = buffer, *attribute;
    while ((attribute = strsep(&state, ",")) != NULL) {
        if (attribute[0] == 'T') {
            return (const char *)[[NSData dataWithBytes:(attribute + 3) length:strlen(attribute) - 4] bytes];
        }
    }
    return "@";
}
share|improve this answer
4  
+1 except this will error on primitives, such as int. Please see my answer below for slightly enhanced version of this same thing. –  orange80 Dec 21 '11 at 18:02
1  
Doesn't appear to work with ARC? –  Ford Jan 25 '12 at 1:19
1  
It does work with ARC. –  Marinov Iván May 1 '12 at 23:24
    
As a matter of correctness, [NSString stringWithCString:] is deprecated in favor of [NSString stringWithCString:encoding:]. –  zekel May 4 '12 at 18:07
1  
Should import objc runtime header #import <objc/runtime.h> It works on ARC. –  Daehyun Nov 22 '12 at 6:30

@boliva's answer is good, but needs a little extra to handle primitives, like int, long, float, double, etc.

I built off of his to add this functionality.

// PropertyUtil.h
#import 

@interface PropertyUtil : NSObject

+ (NSDictionary *)classPropsFor:(Class)klass;

@end


// PropertyUtil.m
#import "PropertyUtil.h"
#import "objc/runtime.h"

@implementation PropertyUtil

static const char * getPropertyType(objc_property_t property) {
    const char *attributes = property_getAttributes(property);
    printf("attributes=%s\n", attributes);
    char buffer[1 + strlen(attributes)];
    strcpy(buffer, attributes);
    char *state = buffer, *attribute;
    while ((attribute = strsep(&state, ",")) != NULL) {
        if (attribute[0] == 'T' && attribute[1] != '@') {
            // it's a C primitive type:
            /* 
                if you want a list of what will be returned for these primitives, search online for
                "objective-c" "Property Attribute Description Examples"
                apple docs list plenty of examples of what you get for int "i", long "l", unsigned "I", struct, etc.            
            */
            return (const char *)[[NSData dataWithBytes:(attribute + 1) length:strlen(attribute) - 1] bytes];
        }        
        else if (attribute[0] == 'T' && attribute[1] == '@' && strlen(attribute) == 2) {
            // it's an ObjC id type:
            return "id";
        }
        else if (attribute[0] == 'T' && attribute[1] == '@') {
            // it's another ObjC object type:
            return (const char *)[[NSData dataWithBytes:(attribute + 3) length:strlen(attribute) - 4] bytes];
        }
    }
    return "";
}


+ (NSDictionary *)classPropsFor:(Class)klass
{    
    if (klass == NULL) {
        return nil;
    }

    NSMutableDictionary *results = [[[NSMutableDictionary alloc] init] autorelease];

    unsigned int outCount, i;
    objc_property_t *properties = class_copyPropertyList(klass, &outCount);
    for (i = 0; i < outCount; i++) {
        objc_property_t property = properties[i];
        const char *propName = property_getName(property);
        if(propName) {
            const char *propType = getPropertyType(property);
            NSString *propertyName = [NSString stringWithUTF8String:propName];
            NSString *propertyType = [NSString stringWithUTF8String:propType];
            [results setObject:propertyType forKey:propertyName];
        }
    }
    free(properties);

    // returning a copy here to make sure the dictionary is immutable
    return [NSDictionary dictionaryWithDictionary:results];
}




@end

share|improve this answer
    
Thats a fantastic code! thanks! –  dreampowder Jan 12 '13 at 12:41
    
Works great. Thanks! –  kevinejohn Jun 20 '13 at 21:54
    
Did you intend to have #import <Foundation/Foundation.h> at the top of the .h file? –  Andrew Nov 7 '13 at 21:05
    
[NSString stringWithUTF8String:propType] couldn't parse "propType const char * "NSNumber\x94\xfdk;" and returns a nil string... Don't know why it is such a weird NSNumber. Mb because ActiveRecord? –  Dumoko Dec 17 '13 at 16:32

@orange80's answer has one problem: It actually doesn't always terminate the string with 0s. This can lead to unexpected results like crashing while trying to convert it to UTF8 (I actually had a pretty annoying crashbug just because of that. Was fun debugging it ^^). I fixed it by actually getting an NSString from the attribute and then calling cStringUsingEncoding:. This works like a charm now. (Also works with ARC, at least for me)

So this is my version of the code now:

// PropertyUtil.h
#import 

@interface PropertyUtil : NSObject

+ (NSDictionary *)classPropsFor:(Class)klass;

@end


// PropertyUtil.m
#import "PropertyUtil.h"
#import <objc/runtime.h>

@implementation PropertyUtil

static const char *getPropertyType(objc_property_t property) {
    const char *attributes = property_getAttributes(property);
    //printf("attributes=%s\n", attributes);
    char buffer[1 + strlen(attributes)];
    strcpy(buffer, attributes);
    char *state = buffer, *attribute;
    while ((attribute = strsep(&state, ",")) != NULL) {
        if (attribute[0] == 'T' && attribute[1] != '@') {
            // it's a C primitive type:
            /*
             if you want a list of what will be returned for these primitives, search online for
             "objective-c" "Property Attribute Description Examples"
             apple docs list plenty of examples of what you get for int "i", long "l", unsigned "I", struct, etc.
             */
            NSString *name = [[NSString alloc] initWithBytes:attribute + 1 length:strlen(attribute) - 1 encoding:NSASCIIStringEncoding];
            return (const char *)[name cStringUsingEncoding:NSASCIIStringEncoding];
        }
        else if (attribute[0] == 'T' && attribute[1] == '@' && strlen(attribute) == 2) {
            // it's an ObjC id type:
            return "id";
        }
        else if (attribute[0] == 'T' && attribute[1] == '@') {
            // it's another ObjC object type:
            NSString *name = [[NSString alloc] initWithBytes:attribute + 3 length:strlen(attribute) - 4 encoding:NSASCIIStringEncoding];
            return (const char *)[name cStringUsingEncoding:NSASCIIStringEncoding];
        }
    }
    return "";
}


+ (NSDictionary *)classPropsFor:(Class)klass
{
    if (klass == NULL) {
        return nil;
    }

    NSMutableDictionary *results = [[NSMutableDictionary alloc] init];

    unsigned int outCount, i;
    objc_property_t *properties = class_copyPropertyList(klass, &outCount);
    for (i = 0; i < outCount; i++) {
        objc_property_t property = properties[i];
        const char *propName = property_getName(property);
        if(propName) {
            const char *propType = getPropertyType(property);
            NSString *propertyName = [NSString stringWithUTF8String:propName];
            NSString *propertyType = [NSString stringWithUTF8String:propType];
            [results setObject:propertyType forKey:propertyName];
        }
    }
    free(properties);

    // returning a copy here to make sure the dictionary is immutable
    return [NSDictionary dictionaryWithDictionary:results];
}

@end
share|improve this answer
    
This solution works fine with ios 7 too. –  Ramiro Sep 21 '13 at 1:58
    
@farthen can you provide an example that demonstrates the problem with the code i provided? i'm just curious to see it. –  orange80 Nov 7 '13 at 21:45
    
@orange80 Well, AFAIR the data is never zero-terminated at all. If it is this only happens on accident. I may be wrong though. In other news: I still have this code running and it runs rock solid :p –  Farthen Nov 8 '13 at 6:20
    
@orange80 I ran into this problem trying to invoke your version on IMAAdRequest from google's IMA ad library. farthen's solution resolved it. –  Christopher Pickslay Mar 3 at 21:18
    
Thanks. This worked for me in iOS7 when the previous two answers didn't. +1 for all 3. –  ChrisH Apr 30 at 15:48

When I tried with iOS 3.2, the getPropertyType function doesn't work well with the property description. I found an example from iOS documentation: "Objective-C Runtime Programming Guide: Declared Properties".

Here is a revised code for property listing in iOS 3.2:

#import <objc/runtime.h>
#import <Foundation/Foundation.h>
...
unsigned int outCount, i;
objc_property_t *properties = class_copyPropertyList([UITouch class], &outCount);
for(i = 0; i < outCount; i++) {
    objc_property_t property = properties[i];
    fprintf(stdout, "%s %s\n", property_getName(property), property_getAttributes(property));
}
free(properties);
share|improve this answer

I've found that boliva's solution works fine in the simulator, but on device the fixed length substring causes problems. I have written a more Objective-C-friendly solution to this problem that works on the device. In my version, I convert the C-String of the attributes to an NSString and perform string operations on it to get a substring of just the type description.

/*
 * @returns A string describing the type of the property
*/

+ (NSString *)propertyTypeStringOfProperty:(objc_property_t) property {
    const char *attr = property_getAttributes(property);
    NSString *const attributes = [NSString stringWithCString:attr encoding:NSUTF8StringEncoding];

    NSRange const typeRangeStart = [attributes rangeOfString:@"T@\""];  // start of type string
    if (typeRangeStart.location != NSNotFound) {
        NSString *const typeStringWithQuote = [attributes substringFromIndex:typeRangeStart.location + typeRangeStart.length];
        NSRange const typeRangeEnd = [typeStringWithQuote rangeOfString:@"\""]; // end of type string
        if (typeRangeEnd.location != NSNotFound) {
            NSString *const typeString = [typeStringWithQuote substringToIndex:typeRangeEnd.location];
            return typeString;
        }
    }
    return nil;
}

/**
* @returns (NSString) Dictionary of property name --> type
*/

+ (NSDictionary *)propertyTypeDictionaryOfClass:(Class)klass {
    NSMutableDictionary *propertyMap = [NSMutableDictionary dictionary];
    unsigned int outCount, i;
    objc_property_t *properties = class_copyPropertyList(klass, &outCount);
    for(i = 0; i < outCount; i++) {
        objc_property_t property = properties[i];
        const char *propName = property_getName(property);
        if(propName) {

            NSString *propertyName = [NSString stringWithCString:propName encoding:NSUTF8StringEncoding];
            NSString *propertyType = [self propertyTypeStringOfProperty:property];
            [propertyMap setValue:propertyType forKey:propertyName];
        }
    }
    free(properties);
    return propertyMap;
}
share|improve this answer

I was able to get @orange80's answer to work WITH ARC ENABLED… ... for what I wanted - at least... but not without a bit of trial and error. Hopefully this additional information may spare someone the grief.

Save those classes he describes in his answer = as a class, and in your AppDelegate.h (or whatever), put #import PropertyUtil.h. Then in your...

- (void)applicationDidFinishLaunching:
         (NSNotification *)aNotification {

method (or whatever)

PropertyUtil *props  = [PropertyUtil new];  
NSDictionary *propsD = [PropertyUtil classPropsFor:
                          (NSObject*)[gist class]];  
NSLog(@"%@, %@", props, propsD);
…

The secret is to cast the instance variable of your class (in this Case my class is Gist, and my instance of Gist is gist) that you want to query... to NSObject(id), etc, won't cut it.. for various, weird, esoteric reasons. This will give you some output like so…

<PropertyUtil: 0x7ff0ea92fd90>, {
apiURL = NSURL;
createdAt = NSDate;
files = NSArray;
gistDescription = NSString;
gistId = NSString;
gitPullURL = NSURL;
gitPushURL = NSURL;
htmlURL = NSURL;
isFork = c;
isPublic = c;
numberOfComments = Q;
updatedAt = NSDate;
userLogin = NSString;
}

For all of Apple's unabashed / OCD bragging about ObjC's "amazeballs" "introspection... They sure don't make it very easy to perform this simple "look" "at one's self", "so to speak"..

If you really want to go hog wild though.. check out.. class-dump, which is a mind-bogglingly insane way to peek into class headers of ANY executable, etc… It provides a VERBOSE look into your classes… that I, personally, find truly helpful - in many, many circumstances. it is actually why I i started seeking a solution to the OP's question. here are some of the usage parameters.. enjoy!

    -a             show instance variable offsets
    -A             show implementation addresses
    --arch <arch>  choose a specific architecture from a universal binary (ppc, ppc64, i386, x86_64)
    -C <regex>     only display classes matching regular expression
    -f <str>       find string in method name
    -I             sort classes, categories, and protocols by inheritance (overrides -s)
    -r             recursively expand frameworks and fixed VM shared libraries
    -s             sort classes and categories by name
    -S             sort methods by name
share|improve this answer

The word "attributes" is a little fuzzy. Do you mean instance variables, properties, methods that look like accessors?

The answer to all three is "yes, but it's not very easy." The Objective-C runtime API includes functions to get the ivar list, method list or property list for a class (e.g., class_copyPropertyList()), and then a corresponding function for each type to get the name of an item in the list (e.g., property_getName()).

All in all, it can be kind of a lot of work to get it right, or at least a lot more than most people would want to do for what usually amounts to a really trivial feature.

Alternatively, you could just write a Ruby/Python script that just reads a header file and looks for whatever you'd consider "attributes" for the class.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi chuck, thanks for your response. What I was refering to with 'attributes' was indeed to a class properties. I already managed to accomplish what I wanted by making use of the Obj-C Runtime Library. Using a script to parse the header file wouldn't have worked for what I needed on runtime. –  boliva Apr 16 '09 at 7:49

I was using function boliva provided, but apparently it stopped working with iOS 7. So now instead of static const char *getPropertyType(objc_property_t property) one can just use the following:

- (NSString*) classOfProperty:(NSString*)propName{

objc_property_t prop = class_getProperty([self class], [propName UTF8String]);
if (!prop) {
    // doesn't exist for object
    return nil;
}
const char * propAttr = property_getAttributes(prop);
NSString *propString = [NSString stringWithUTF8String:propAttr];
NSArray *attrArray = [propString componentsSeparatedByString:@","];
NSString *class=[attrArray objectAtIndex:0];
return [[class stringByReplacingOccurrencesOfString:@"\"" withString:@""] stringByReplacingOccurrencesOfString:@"T@" withString:@""];
}
share|improve this answer
    
You're My hero. I still have to manually correct some things (For some reason BOOLs are coming up as 'Tc'), but this actually allowed me to get things working again. –  Harpastum Sep 11 '13 at 2:22
    
Primitives have their own type, "@" denotes objects and after it the class name appears between quotes. The only exception is id which is encoded simply as "T@" –  Mihai Timar Jul 14 at 21:09

If someone is in the need of getting as well the properties inherited from the parent classes (as I did) here is some modification on "orange80" code to make it recursive:

+ (NSDictionary *)classPropsForClassHierarchy:(Class)klass onDictionary:(NSMutableDictionary *)results
{
    if (klass == NULL) {
        return nil;
    }

    //stop if we reach the NSObject class as is the base class
    if (klass == [NSObject class]) {
        return [NSDictionary dictionaryWithDictionary:results];
    }
    else{

        unsigned int outCount, i;
        objc_property_t *properties = class_copyPropertyList(klass, &outCount);
        for (i = 0; i < outCount; i++) {
            objc_property_t property = properties[i];
            const char *propName = property_getName(property);
            if(propName) {
                const char *propType = getPropertyType(property);
                NSString *propertyName = [NSString stringWithUTF8String:propName];
                NSString *propertyType = [NSString stringWithUTF8String:propType];
                [results setObject:propertyType forKey:propertyName];
            }
        }
        free(properties);

        //go for the superclass
        return [PropertyUtil classPropsForClassHierarchy:[klass superclass] onDictionary:results];

    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Couldn't we make this a category and extend NSObject with it so this functionality is built into every class that is a child of NSObject? –  Alex Zavatone Dec 12 '13 at 22:12
    
That sounds like a good idea, if I can find the time will update the answer with that option. –  Emilio Dec 13 '13 at 12:22
    
Once you're done with that, I'll add a method dump when I have time. It's about time we got real object property and method introspection on top of every NSObject. –  Alex Zavatone Dec 13 '13 at 16:12
    
I've been working on adding value output as well, but it appears that for some structures (rects), the type is the actual value of the property. This is the case with the caretRect of a tableViewController and other unsigned ints in a viewController struct return c or f as the type which conflicts with the objective-C Runtime docs. Clearly more work is needed here to get this complete. developer.apple.com/library/mac/documentation/cocoa/conceptual/… –  Alex Zavatone Dec 13 '13 at 21:26
    
I was giving a look but there is a problem I cannot workaround, to make it recursive I need to call the method for the superclass (like in the last line of the previous code) as NSObject is the root class that wont work inside a category. So no recursivity possible... :( not sure if a category in NSObject is the way to go anymore... –  Emilio Dec 16 '13 at 9:27

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