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This is something that I haven't seen in the PHPdoc for switch() so I'm not sure if it's possible, but I'd like to have a case which is multi-conditional, such as:

switch($this) {
   case "yes" || "maybe":
      include "filename.php";
      break;
   ... 
}

Is this valid syntax/is this even possible with a switch() statement?

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up vote 8 down vote accepted

Usually you'd just use case fall-through.

switch($this) {
   case "yes":
   case "maybe":
      include "filename.php";
      break;
   ... 
}
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First to it, thanks! I'll accept as soon as the timer drops! – Avicinnian Sep 25 '11 at 21:11

Is this valid syntax/is this even possible with a switch() statement?

No and no. The expression will be evaluated as ("yes" or "maybe"), which will result in true. switch will then test against that result.

You want to use

case "yes":
case "maybe":
// some code
break;
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Should be

switch($this) { 
   case "yes":
   case "maybe": 
      include "filename.php"; 
      break; 
   ...  
} 
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You can do this with fall-through:

switch ($this) {
    case "yes":
    case "no":
        include "filename.php";
        break;
}
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Sure, just specify two cases without breaking the first one, like so:

switch($this) {
   case "yes":
   case "maybe":
      include "filename.php";
      break;
   ... 
}

If you don't break a case, then any code for that case is run and continues on to execute additional code until the execution is broken. It will continue through all cases below it until it sees a break.

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