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This code compiles:

def wtf(arg: Any) = {  
  arg match {  
    case Nil => "Nil was passed to arg"  
    case List() => "List() was passed to arg"  
    case _ =>"otherwise"  
  }  
}

But this one does not:

def wtf(arg: Any) = {  
  arg match {  
    case List() => "List() was passed to arg"  
    case Nil => "Nil was passed to arg"  
    case _ =>"otherwise"  
  }  
}  

The line case Nil => ... is marked as unreachable code. Why, in the first case, the line case List() => ... is not marked with the same error?

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1  
Thanks for your answer, but note that in the first case (the "good" one) the line case List() .... is also unreachable and the compiler does not mark it. –  ferrito Sep 25 '11 at 23:07
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4 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The actual answer requires understanding an unfortunate implementation detail which cost me a lot of time to discover.

1) case List() invokes an extractor, for which no exhaustivity/unreachability checking is possible in the general case because extractors invoke arbitrary functions. So far so good, we can't be expected to overturn the halting problem.

2) Way back in the more "wild west" days of the compiler, it was determined that pattern matching could be sped up rather a lot (and not lose exhaustivity checking) if "case List()" were just translated to "case Nil" during an early compiler phase so it would avoid the extractor. This is still the case and although it could be undone, apparently lots of people have been told that "case List() => " is perfectly fine and we don't want to pessimize all their code all of a sudden. So I just have to figure out a road out.

You can see empirically that List is privileged by trying it with some other class. No unreachability errors.

import scala.collection.immutable.IndexedSeq
val Empty: IndexedSeq[Nothing] = IndexedSeq()
def wtf1(arg: Any) = {  
  arg match {  
    case Empty => "Nil was passed to arg"  
    case IndexedSeq() => "IndexedSeq() was passed to arg"  
    case _ =>"otherwise"  
  }  
}

def wtf2(arg: Any) = {  
  arg match {  
    case IndexedSeq() => "IndexedSeq() was passed to arg"  
    case Empty => "Nil was passed to arg"  
    case _ =>"otherwise"  
  }  
}  
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The discrepancy is particularly weird since the code for the Nil case in the second version is definitely not unreachable, as we can see if we hide things from the compiler a bit:

def wtf(arg: Any) = {
  arg match {
    case List() => "List() was passed to arg"  
    case x => x match {
      case Nil => "Nil was passed to arg"
      case _ =>"otherwise"
    }
  }
}

Now wtf(Vector()) will return "Nil was passed to arg". This may also seem counterintuitive, but it's because literal patterns match values that are equal in terms of ==, and Vector() == Nil, but Vector() doesn't match the extractor pattern List().

More concisely:

scala> (Vector(): Seq[_]) match { case List() => true; case Nil => false }
<console>:8: error: unreachable code

scala> (Vector(): Seq[_]) match { case List() => true; case x => x match { case Nil => false } }
res0: Boolean = false

So the compiler's response is completely reversed: in the "good" version the second case is unreachable, and in the "bad" version the second case is perfectly fine. I've reported this as a bug (SI-5029).

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2  
+1 - and you're right. It looks like a bug. –  Don Roby Sep 26 '11 at 2:22
    
You're not comparing like with like in your last example, the following also produces false case x if x == scala.collection.mutable.ListBuffer() => false –  Matthew Farwell Sep 26 '11 at 9:11
    
@Matthew, if the compiler allowed us (correctly, I think) to write case Nil => false, then Nil would be a literal pattern and would match using ==. In your example ListBuffer() is an extractor pattern, which doesn't (necessarily) use ==. Or am I misunderstanding your point? –  Travis Brown Sep 26 '11 at 10:50
    
My comment wasn't very clear—I just mean that case x if x == ListBuffer() isn't equivalent to case ListBuffer(), while case x if x == Nil is equivalent to case Nil. –  Travis Brown Sep 26 '11 at 11:06
    
My point is that the case x if == is a guard clause, not an extractor pattern. When you use case directly, it's doing an extra check that the classes are compatible. According to your logic the two are equivalent, but try (Vector(): Any) match { case scala.collection.mutable.ListBuffer() => "listBuffer"} as opposed to (Vector(): Any) match { case x if x == new scala.collection.mutable.ListBuffer() => "listBuffer" } –  Matthew Farwell Sep 26 '11 at 11:12
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Nil is an object extending List[Nothing]. Being more specific than List(), it isn't reached if it appears after List() in the case expression.

While I think the above is more or less true, it's likely not the whole story.

There are hints in the article Matching Objects with Patterns, though I don't see a definitive answer there.

I suspect that detection of unreachability is simply more completely implemented for named constants and literals than for constructor patterns, and that List() is being interpreted as a constructor pattern (even though it's a trivial one), while Nil is a named constant.

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Thanks for your answer, but note that in the first case (the "good" one) the line case List() .... is also unreachable and the compiler does not mark it. def(List()) returns "Nil was passed to arg" –  ferrito Sep 25 '11 at 23:10
    
@Don, maybe you can explain in your answer why there are some empty lists that are not Nil? –  Dan Cecile Sep 26 '11 at 0:06
    
@Dan, actually I don't think there are empty lists that aren't Nil. –  Don Roby Sep 26 '11 at 0:49
    
@Don, oh, I see. So Nil is just a more specific case because of how it's declared in the standard Scala library. –  Dan Cecile Sep 26 '11 at 1:28
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I cannot find anything in the language specification with respect to unreachable match clauses. Somebody correct me if I'm wrong.

So I assume that unreachable compilation errors are on a best effort basis, which may explain why the first case does not complain.

scala -Xprint:typer suggests that Nil is a literal pattern using immutable.this.Nil.== to check for a match, while List() is an extractor pattern. Looking at the implementation of the extractor in it seems to be doing something like this:

def unapplySeq[A](x: CC[A]): Some[CC[A]] = Some(x)

So I got curious and rolled out an alternate implementation:

object ListAlt {
  def unapplySeq[A](l: List[A]): Some[List[A]] = Some(l)
}

It matches like List():

scala> Nil match { case ListAlt() => 1 }
res0: Int = 1

But if I implement your function with it, it compiles fine (except for unchecked warning):

def f(a: Any) = a match { case ListAlt() => 1 case Nil => 2 case _ => 0 }

scala> f(List())
res2: Int = 1

scala> f(Nil)
res3: Int = 1

scala> f(4)
res4: Int = 0

So I am wondering if the pattern matcher implementation has some special casing for Nil and List(). May be it treats List() as a literal...

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"May be it treats List() as a literal..." Very insightful, that's essentially exactly what it does. –  extempore Sep 29 '11 at 19:37
    
(Assuming the set of things which are essentially exact is not empty.) –  extempore Sep 29 '11 at 19:38
    
@extempore, cool, I did try to look at ParallelMatching.scala and other files under scala/tools/nsc/matching but I gave up after 20 minutes or so. –  huynhjl Sep 29 '11 at 19:46
    
It's in Typers: pastie.org/2613369 –  extempore Sep 29 '11 at 21:13
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