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So I've been working on this for awhile and I can't seem to figure out what's wrong. This addSorted function adds in all the correct values in their respectable places of the sorted array but when it goes into add a 0 to the front of the list, the program will not terminate and there is no result displayed. Anyone have any clue of why this may be?

void addSorted(Data * newData){
    if(head == NULL) {
        head = new LinkNode(newData);
        return;
    }
    LinkNode * current = head;
    LinkNode * previous = NULL;
    while(current != NULL) {
        if(newData->compareTo(current->data) == -1) {
            LinkNode * newNode = new LinkNode(newData);
            newNode->next = current;
            if(previous == NULL) {
                current->next = newNode;
            }
            else {
                newNode->next = previous->next;
                previous->next = newNode;
            }
        return;
        }
    previous = current;
    current = current->next;
    }
previous->next = new LinkNode(newData);
}
share|improve this question
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Is the result of compareTo being -1 mean that it is less than the current node?

And if previous==NULL you set current->next to point to the newNode, which means they are pointing to each other, as newNode->next is also pointing to the current node.

I think the root of your problem may be this, actually.

       newNode->next = current;
       current->next = newNode;

Hopefully by putting it this way you can see what I am talking about.

share|improve this answer
    
YES. IT WORKS. THANK YOU SO MUCH. I just had to change current->next = newNode to head = newNode. :)))))))))))))))))) – BleuCheese Sep 25 '11 at 23:18
    
You may want to find a teddy bear to describe what the problem is to, and then you will probably find most of your errors. I use co-workers instead of a teddy bear, same result. :) – James Black Sep 25 '11 at 23:21
    
    
Lol I've never heard of this before but it actual sounds like a good idea because you force yourself so read your code aloud, line by line. Thanks. – BleuCheese Sep 26 '11 at 0:01
    
@BleuCheese - I don't remember where I read it, but some computer science department required that students explain their problem to the bear before talking to the TAs, and it cut down on how many needed to speak to the TAs. I just thought it was an interesting idea. – James Black Sep 26 '11 at 1:53

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