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UNION joins two results and remove duplicates, while UNION ALL does not remove duplicates. UNION also sort the final output.

What I want is the UNION ALL without duplicates and without the sort. Is that possible?

The reason for this is that I want the result of the first query to be on top of the final result, and the second query at the bottom. (And each sorted as if they where run individually)

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WHat SQL vendor is this? I don't think the standard requires UNION ALL sorts anything - actually the fact it does not sort it usually what makes it a better choice than plain UNION –  Romain Sep 26 '11 at 7:51
    
@MikaelEriksson: That's what the OP said (albeit in a jumbled order). He wants to do a UNION but not have the implied sorting. –  mwan Sep 26 '11 at 7:55
    
@mwan - You are right. I misread the question. –  Mikael Eriksson Sep 26 '11 at 7:59
    
What does UNION ALL without duplicates mean? What if something appears in both result sets? It should be removed from the top, bottom or neither? –  Martin Smith Sep 26 '11 at 8:04
    
@MartinSmith: I see your point. The first query should have "priority", so duplicates should be removed from bottom –  hightow Sep 26 '11 at 8:16

7 Answers 7

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Given the clarification "The first query should have "priority", so duplicates should be removed from bottom"

SELECT col1,
       col2,
       MIN(grp) AS source_group
FROM   (SELECT 1 AS grp,
               col1,
               col2
        FROM   t1
        UNION ALL
        SELECT 2 AS grp,
               col1,
               col2
        FROM   t2) AS t
GROUP  BY col1,
          col2
ORDER  BY MIN(grp),
          col1  
share|improve this answer
    
+1 exposing the sort order to the caller is good practice anyhow. –  onedaywhen Sep 26 '11 at 7:57
    
@onedaywhen - Thanks for the edit. Missed that in the question. –  Martin Smith Sep 26 '11 at 8:03
    
This works if eliminating duplicates within the individual queries is all that's required, but not if removing duplicates across both queries is also required. –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Sep 26 '11 at 8:04
    
@Damien - Agreed. Just posted a comment asking for clarification on this. –  Martin Smith Sep 26 '11 at 8:05
    
I take back my +1 -- see my answer, which 'corrects' @dursun's answer :) –  onedaywhen Sep 26 '11 at 8:13

"UNION also sort the final output" - only as an implementation artifact. It is by no means guaranteed to perform the sort, and if you need a particular sort order, you should specify it with an ORDER BY clause. Otherwise, the output order is whatever is most convenient for the server to provide.

As such, your request for a function that performs a UNION ALL but that removes duplicates is easy - it's called UNION.


From your clarification, you also appear to believe that a UNION ALL will return all of the results from the first query before the results of the subsequent queries. This is also not guaranteed. Again, the only way to achieve a particular order is to specify it using an ORDER BY clause.

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SELECT *, 1 AS sort_order
  FROM table1
 EXCEPT 
SELECT *, 1 AS sort_order
  FROM table2
UNION
SELECT *, 1 AS sort_order
  FROM table1
 INTERSECT 
SELECT *, 1 AS sort_order
  FROM table2
UNION
SELECT *, 2 AS sort_order
  FROM table2
 EXCEPT 
SELECT *, 2 AS sort_order
  FROM table1
ORDER BY sort_order;

But the real answer is: other than the ORDER BY clause, the sort order will by arbitrary and not guaranteed.

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select T.Col1, T.Col2, T.Sort
from 
    (
      select T.Col1,
             T.Col2,
             T.Sort,
             rank() over(partition by T.Col1, T.Col2 order by T.Sort) as rn
      from
          (
            select Col1, Col2, 1 as Sort
            from Table1
            union all
            select Col1, Col2, 2
            from Table2
          ) as T
    ) as T
where T.rn = 1    
order by T.Sort
share|improve this answer

Consider these tables (Standard SQL code, runs on SQL Server 2008):

WITH A 
     AS 
     (
      SELECT * 
        FROM (
              VALUES (1), 
                     (2), 
                     (3), 
                     (4), 
                     (5), 
                     (6) 
             ) AS T (col)
     ),
     B 
     AS 
     (
      SELECT * 
        FROM (
              VALUES (9), 
                     (8), 
                     (7), 
                     (6), 
                     (5), 
                     (4) 
             ) AS T (col)
     ), ...

The desired effect is this to sort table A by col ascending, sort table B by col descending then unioning the two, removing duplicates, retaining order before the union and leaving table A results on the "top" with table B on the "bottom" e.g. (pesudo code)

(
 SELECT *
   FROM A
  ORDER 
     BY col
)
UNION
(
 SELECT *
   FROM B
  ORDER 
     BY col DESC
);

Of course, this won't work in SQL because there can only be one ORDER BY clause and it can only be applied to the top level table expression (or whatever the output of a SELECT query is known as; I call it the "resultset").

The first thing to address is the intersection between the two tables, in this case the values 4, 5 and 6. How the intersection should be sorted needs to be specified in SQL code, therefore it is desirable that the designer specifies this too! (i.e. the person asking the question, in this case).

The implication in this case would seem to be that the intersection ("duplicates") should be sorted within the results for table A. Therefore, the sorted resultset should look like this:

      VALUES (1), -- A including intersection, ascending
             (2), -- A including intersection, ascending
             (3), -- A including intersection, ascending
             (4), -- A including intersection, ascending
             (5), -- A including intersection, ascending
             (6), -- A including intersection, ascending
             (9), -- B only, descending 
             (8), -- B only, descending  
             (7), -- B only, descending 

Note in SQL "top" and "bottom" has no inferent meaning and a table (other than a resultset) has no inherent ordering. Also (to cut a long story short) consider that UNION removes duplicate rows by implication and must be applied before ORDER BY. The conclusion has to be that each table's sort order must be explicitly defined by exposing a sort order column(s) before being unioned. For this we can use the ROW_NUMBER() windowed function e.g.

     ...
     A_ranked
     AS
     (
      SELECT col, 
             ROW_NUMBER() OVER (ORDER BY col) AS sort_order_1
        FROM A                      -- include the intersection
     ),
     B_ranked
     AS
     (
      SELECT *, 
             ROW_NUMBER() OVER (ORDER BY col DESC) AS sort_order_1
        FROM B
       WHERE NOT EXISTS (           -- exclude the intersection
                         SELECT * 
                           FROM A
                          WHERE A.col = B.col 
                        )
     )
SELECT *, 1 AS sort_order_0 
  FROM A_ranked
UNION
SELECT *, 2 AS sort_order_0 
  FROM B_ranked
ORDER BY sort_order_0, sort_order_1;
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The sort is used to eliminate the duplicates, and is implicit for DISTINCT and UNION queries (but not UNION ALL) - you could still specify the columns you'd prefer to order by if you need them sorted by specific columns.

For example, if you wanted to sort by the result sets, you could introduce an additional column, and sort by that first:

SELECT foo, bar, 1 as ResultSet
FROM Foo
WHERE bar = 1
UNION
SELECT foo, bar, 2 as ResultSet
FROM Foo
WHERE bar = 3
UNION
SELECT foo, bar, 3 as ResultSet
FROM Foo
WHERE bar = 2
ORDER BY ResultSet
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I assume your tables are table1 and table2 respectively, and your solution is;

(select * from table1 MINUS select * from table2)
UNION ALL
(select * from table2 MINUS select * from table1)
share|improve this answer
    
Won't this eliminate all rows that have duplicates? I rather think they want to just remove the duplicates! –  onedaywhen Sep 26 '11 at 8:01
    
See my answer for a correction (I'm using Standard SQL's EXCEPT rather than Oracle's MINUS but that's not the correction :) –  onedaywhen Sep 26 '11 at 8:15

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