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I do not know much about these technologies, and was not very successful at finding how an exception stack is displayed.

Therefore, several basic questions:

  • how are 2 independent successive exceptions shown?
  • how are several chained exceptions displayed?
  • is the root cause displayed at the top or the bottom of the stack?
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1  
What are you refering to with "chained"? Do you mean the Exception.InnerException property? –  Uwe Keim Sep 26 '11 at 9:18

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It's pretty easy to try this for yourself. For example:

using System;

class Test
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        try
        {
            Top();
        }
        catch (Exception e)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(e);
        }
    }

    static void Top()
    {
        try
        {
            Middle();
        }
        catch (Exception e)
        {
            throw new Exception("Exception from top", e);
        }
    }

    static void Middle()
    {
        try
        {
            Bottom();
        }
        catch (Exception e)
        {
            throw new Exception("Exception from middle", e);
        }
    }

    static void Bottom()
    {
        throw new Exception("Exception from bottom");
    }
}

Results (the first two lines would be on one line if it were long enough):

System.Exception: Exception from top ---> System.Exception: Exception from middle
      ---> System.Exception: Exception from bottom
   at Test.Bottom() in c:\Users\Jon\Test\Test.cs:line 43
   at Test.Middle() in c:\Users\Jon\Test\Test.cs:line 33
   --- End of inner exception stack trace ---
   at Test.Middle() in c:\Users\Jon\Test\Test.cs:line 37
   at Test.Top() in c:\Users\Jon\Test\Test.cs:line 21
   --- End of inner exception stack trace ---
   at Test.Top() in c:\Users\Jon\Test\Test.cs:line 25
   at Test.Main(String[] args) in c:\Users\Jon\Test\Test.cs:line 9
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exactly what I was going to demonstrate. finishing touch: ideone.com/99sKB –  sehe Sep 26 '11 at 10:04
    
The thing I'm using an external C#/.Net program, I do not have any environment set up for this (therefore my question ;)) –  Rolf Sep 26 '11 at 10:46
    
@Rolf: Do you not have .NET installed anywhere? All you need is the framework and Notepad... –  Jon Skeet Sep 26 '11 at 10:53
    
@Jon, I don't think notepad and csc.exe is a good choice for a beginner. Something like LINQPad might be better. –  svick Sep 26 '11 at 11:20
    
@svick: My point is that notepad and csc.exe is enough to have tested out this question without installing any other software. –  Jon Skeet Sep 26 '11 at 11:32

When two independent successive exceptions are thrown, the first one will interrupt the normal execution of the program, until it is handled. Then, the second exception will be thrown in the same way, if the program was not terminated by the first one.

As for chained exceptions, you will see the last thrown exception, but that last exception was thrown when handling another exception and so forth. For example:

void Foo()
{
    throw new FooException("foo");
}

void Bar()
{
    try
    {
        Foo();
    }
    catch(FooException ex)
    {
        throw new BarException("bar", /* innerException = */ ex);
    }
}

So at the top of the stack you will see BarException and at the bottom, the FooException. Hope I did not miss anything.

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