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I have a rather strange situation where I would like to be able to define certain constants that a subclass of an ABC can override.

struct A {
    static const int a = 20;
    virtual int func() = 0;
};
struct B : public A {
    static const int a = 3;
    int func() { return 5; }
};
struct C : public A {
    static const int a = 4;
    int func() { return 3; }
};

Unfortunately, if I use A *aPtr = new B, aPtr->a will return 20, instead of 3.

One workaround I see is one-liner functions (along the lines of func in the above example), but the syntax of constants is quite a bit more appropriate for this particularly situation conceptually. Is there a syntactically reasonable way of resolving which constants to use at runtime, where the calling code doesn't need to know anything after initial object creation?

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possible duplicate of Overriding static variables when subclassing –  一二三 Sep 26 '11 at 10:01
    
The reasoning behind wanting this may be flawed: A constant is supposed to be, well, constant. It's not sometimes constant and sometimes something else. Similarly, static members are properties of classes, not instances, so they play no role in inheritance, which is an instance-based concept. –  Kerrek SB Sep 26 '11 at 10:56

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Constants, especially static constants, cannot be overriden like you are asking for. You would have to use a virtual function instead:

struct A {
    virtual int get_a() { return 20; }
    int func() = 0;
};

struct B : public A {
    virtual int get_a() { return 3; }
    int func() { return 5; }
};

struct C : public A {
    virtual int get_a() { return 4; }
    int func() { return 3; }
};

Another option would be to use a template for the constant instead:

template< const int a_value = 20 >
struct A {
    static const int a = a_value;
    int func() = 0;
};

struct B : public A<3> {
    int func() { return 5; }
};

struct C : public A<4> {
    int func() { return 3; }
};
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4  
For the templated version one should note that the classes B and C are now entirely unrelated, since they have different base classes. –  Kerrek SB Sep 26 '11 at 10:58

You can get answer from the example itself ! :) Just declare a method like get_a() which is virtual and override the same.

struct A {
    static const int a = 20;
    virtual int get_a() const { return a; }  // <--- for A
};
struct B : public A {
    static const int a = 3;
    virtual int get_a() const { return a; }    // <--- for B
};
struct C : public A {
    static const int a = 4;
    virtual int get_a() const { return a; }    // <--- for C
};

Also note that, only method can be overridden in C++ and not the variables.

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