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I have a code in which i am extracting strings from environment using getenv, parsing them into numbers using strtod. If user enters, 213.123. Then 213 and 123 will be individually fed to a long type.

long a1 = 213; long a2 = 123

The problem i am facing is, if user enters a very long number like: 123456789123.45678, it is automatically getting rounded off, which i don't want and instead throw an error, however ERANGE isn't working.

9 static  volatile int flag;                   /* flag variable to indicate when the measurement should start */
10 static  time_t       ef_errtrack_start_sec;  /* error track start time in seconds */
11 static  long         ef_errtrack_start_nsec; /* error track start time in nanoseconds */
12 static  time_t       ef_errtrack_end_sec;    /* error track end time in seconds */
13 static  long         ef_errtrack_end_nsec;   /* error track end time in nanoseconds */

21 int main(int argc, char **argv)
22 {
23     extractTime(1); /* Extracting start time */
24     extractTime(0); /* Extracting end time   */
25 
26     printf("start: %12d, %12d\n", ef_errtrack_start_sec, ef_errtrack_start_nsec);
27     printf("end:   %12d, %12d\n", ef_errtrack_end_sec,   ef_errtrack_end_nsec);
28 
29     return 0;
30 }


35 void extractTime(int extractStartTime)
36 {
37         char * charPtr, * numberFormatErr;
38         regex_t re;
39 
40         ( extractStartTime == 1 ) ? ( charPtr = getenv("EF_ERRTRACK_START") ) :
41                 ( charPtr = getenv("EF_ERRTRACK_END") );
42 
43         if ( charPtr == NULL )
44                 return;
45 
46         double envVal = strtod(charPtr, &numberFormatErr);
47 
48         if ( (numberFormatErr == charPtr) || (*numberFormatErr != '\0') ) {
49                 ( extractStartTime == 1 ) ? printf("eFence exited: EF_ERRTRACK_START is not a number\n") :
50                         printf("eFence exited: EF_ERRTRACK_END is not a number\n");
51                 exit(1);
52         }
53         if ( errno == ERANGE )
54         {
55                 ( extractStartTime == 1 ) ? EF_Print("eFence exited: EF_ERRTRACK_START is out of range\n") :
56                         EF_Print("eFence exited: EF_ERRTRACK_END is out of range\n");
57                 exit(1);
58         }
59         else if ( envVal < 0 ) {
60                 ( extractStartTime == 1 ) ? printf("eFence exited: EF_ERRTRACK_START a negative number\n") :
61                         printf("eFence exited: EF_ERRTRACK_END is a negative number\n");
62                 exit(1);
63         }
64 
65         if ( extractStartTime ) {
66                 ef_errtrack_start_sec = envVal;
67                 double nsec = (envVal) - (double)(ef_errtrack_start_sec);
68                 ef_errtrack_start_nsec = (long)(nsec * 1000000000);
69         }
70         else {
71                 ef_errtrack_end_sec = envVal;
72                 double nsec = (envVal) - (double)(ef_errtrack_end_sec);
73                 ef_errtrack_end_nsec = (long) (nsec * 1000000000);
74         }
75 }

Here is the output:

Output:
/tmp # export EF_ERRTRACK_START=1234567891234.123456789123
/tmp # export EF_ERRTRACK_END=10e2

/tmp/time_related # ./a.out 

start:   2147483647,   2147483647
end:           1000,            0
share|improve this question
2  
If you want longs, why are you using strtod instead of strtol? – pmg Sep 26 '11 at 11:22
    
Why would this set ERANGE - the number you have provided is within the range DBL_MIN to DBL_MAX? – Nim Sep 26 '11 at 11:24
    
@pmg: This is because users will enter as floating point number. I think i had given the example. export EF_ERRTRACK_START=231.345 – kingsmasher1 Sep 26 '11 at 11:27
    
@Nim: The purpose is, this will be fed to a timespec structure which takes long, and it will be truncated from the double. 213.679 = 213 secs + (0.345 x 10^9 nano seconds) – kingsmasher1 Sep 26 '11 at 11:29
    
@king ... so what? do strtol twice ignoring the decimal point. – pmg Sep 26 '11 at 11:29

"Outside the range of representable values" means bigger than DBL_MAX. Your input is in range, it just isn't exactly representable as a double.

For that matter, 0.1 is also in range, and also isn't exactly representable. Should that also be an error, and if not, what's the difference?

I'm not sure what to advise you to do, because I'm not sure why you consider your case an error. One option would be that once you have your double, convert it back to string with snprintf and compare to the original input, see whether they are equal at least as far as the decimal point. That ignores scientific notation, though, so there may be more work required to identify the numbers you don't like.

Edit: ah, initially I didn't really assimilate this: "If user enters, 213.123. Then 213 and 123 will be individually fed to a long type."

Sounds like what you are reading is not a double value, it's two integer values separated by a period character. So don't use strtod, find the . and then call strtol on each side of it.

share|improve this answer
    
The purpose is, this will be fed to a timespec structure which takes long, and it will be truncated from the double. 213.679 = 213 secs + (0.345 x 10^9 nano seconds) and then into a timer. and timespec structure takes arguments of type time_t which is long and a long value – kingsmasher1 Sep 26 '11 at 11:31
    
We can't directly use strtol as it cannot parse an exponential number – kingsmasher1 Sep 26 '11 at 11:44
    
What i mean is, user can also export as export EF_ERRTRACK_START=13e2 which strtol cannot parse. – kingsmasher1 Sep 26 '11 at 11:48
2  
@kindsmasher1 - I realise that you want to make the user's life easy and flexible - however there are times where it makes sense to enforce some rules - if the expectation here is that the user enter a second/nanosecond value why not enforce a specific pattern - i.e. "%ld %ld" - a space separated attribute which has two longs - I think this is fairly reasonable... Else you'll have to do a lot of magic (i.e. checking the string to see if scientific, and then parsing one way or another - it will be horrible.) – Nim Sep 26 '11 at 11:50
2  
@kinsmasher1: you also can't stop the user typing "six weeks ago next Tuesday" into that environment variable, but just because the user can type it in doesn't mean you necessarily have to accept it and figure out what they mean by it. – Steve Jessop Sep 26 '11 at 13:00

I think you have to parse the input, identify the possible types (and errors) and act accordingly (no double necessary)

if input has no '.' and no 'e' then secs = input; nano = 0;
if input has '.' and no 'e' then secs = firstpart; nano = secondpart (scaled appropriately)
if input has no '.' but has 'e' then convert into the 1st or 2nd format above
if input has '.' and 'e' then convert into the 1st or 2nd format above
if input has '.' after 'e' then give error
if input has 2 or more '.' then give error
if input has 2 or more 'e' then give error
... something else I didn't think about
share|improve this answer
    
That parsing strtod can do it directly. – kingsmasher1 Sep 26 '11 at 12:11
    
Except that by using the library you have no control over errors. By making your own parser you can control and bypass errors in input you consider OK but the library doesn't. – pmg Sep 26 '11 at 12:16
    
How?? strtod while parsing a scientific number can give errors. – kingsmasher1 Sep 26 '11 at 12:19
    
I meant rounding and errors. You control rounding and error within your own parser. – pmg Sep 26 '11 at 12:35

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