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I know there are some difference between ANSI C 89 and C that supports by C++.

for example in ANSI C 89, you should declare variables at first line of blocks.

or when you want to declare struct variables, you should use struct keyword (eg struct student std1;).

or // is not valid for commenting and you should use /**/ for commenting in ANSI C 89.

for example this C code is not valid in ANSI C 89:

struct student
{
  char* name;
};

enum number
{
  ODD,
  EVEN
};

void test()
{
  printf("Hello world!");
  int a, b; // Not valid in ANSI C 89, variables should declare at first line of blocks.
  student std1; // Not valid. It should be: struct student std1;
  struct student std2; // Valid.
  number n1 = ODD; // Not valid.
  enum number n2 = EVEN; // Valid.
}

I want to develope an application using ANSI C 89 and my question is:

What is the difference between ANSI C 89 and C that supports by C++?

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closed as not a real question by BЈовић, larsmans, Code Monkey, Jens Gustedt, AProgrammer Sep 26 '11 at 12:28

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
are you talking about C99? en.wikipedia.org/wiki/C99 –  Karoly Horvath Sep 26 '11 at 11:30
    
What do you mean by "C that supports by C++"? Are you talking about C99? Most compilers, even ones that support C99, will let you switch on "strict ANSI" options to warn or error in case of non-ANSI constructs being used. –  Vicky Sep 26 '11 at 11:30
    
What is "C that supports by C++"? C++ is a different language which has C as subset, but introduces many changes and differences. –  glglgl Sep 26 '11 at 11:31
    
@yi_H: No! I want to use ANSI C 89, because C99 is not supported by some comiplers (for example MS VC++). –  Amir Saniyan Sep 26 '11 at 11:32
1  
There's no such thing as "C that is supported by C++". C++ is a language. C is another language. C++ permits a lot of things that are permitted in C89 -- most of them in fact. But there are loads of things that C++ allows and C doesn't not - keyword class for example, and std::vector. The C++ standard is much longer than the C standard, answers here cannot possibly list all the differences. Just learn C89 from a book such as K&R. –  Steve Jessop Sep 26 '11 at 11:32

1 Answer 1

The C subset of C++98/03 is modeled on C89 (obviously, since C99 wasn't out at the time); that of C++11 is modeled on C99. Nonetheless, the languages are quite different and the C subset of C++ isn't the same as the language C.

You're essentially asking "what's the difference between C++ and C", which isn't really a suitable question.

(For example, sizeof('a') is different in C and in C++, so if you're using MSVC++, knowing the C standard on which C++ was modeled doesn't help you at all).

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1  
+1 for "the C subset of C++ isn't the same as the language C." Ain't it the truth. –  Pete Wilson Sep 26 '11 at 11:41
    
You're essentially asking "what's the difference between C++ and C", which isn't really a suitable question. - this means that your answer should be really a comment and the question should be closed, no? –  BЈовић Sep 26 '11 at 11:43

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