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@DataPoints public static final Integer[] input1={1,2};
@Theory
@Test
public void test1(int input1){

}

@DataPoints public static final Integer[] input2={3,4};
@Theory
@Test
public void test2(int input2 ){

}

I want that test1 runs with data set input1 - {1,2} and test2 runs with input2 - {3,4}. But currently each test runs with both the data sets {1,2,3,4}. How to bind specific @DataPoints to specific @Theorys

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1 Answer 1

up vote 15 down vote accepted

DataPoints apply to the class. If you have a @Theory method which takes an int, and you have a DataPoint which is an array of ints, then it will be called with the int.

@RunWith(Theories.class)
public class TheoryTest {
    @DataPoint public static int input1 = 45;
    @DataPoint public static int input2 = 46;
    @DataPoints public static String[] inputs = new String[] { "foobar", "barbar" };

    @Theory public void testString1(String input) {
        System.out.println("testString1 input=" + input);
    }

    @Theory public void testString2(String input) {
        System.out.println("testString2 input=" + input);
    }

    @Theory public void test1(int input) {
        System.out.println("test1 input=" + input);
    }

    @Theory public void test2(int input) {
        System.out.println("test2 input=" + input);
    }
}

This calls test1 with 45 & 46, and test2 with 45 & 46. It calls testString1 with "foobar" and "barbar" and testString2 with "foobar" and "barbar".

If you really want to use different data sets for different theories, you can wrap the data in a private class:

@RunWith(Theories.class)
public class TheoryTest {
    public static class I1 { int i; public I1(int i) { this.i = i;} }
    public static class I2 { int i; public I2(int i) { this.i = i;} }

    @DataPoint public static I1 input1 = new I1(45);
    @DataPoint public static I2 input2 = new I2(46);

    @Theory
    public void test1(I1 input) {
        System.out.println("test1 input=" + input.i);
    }

    @Theory
    public void test2(I2 input) {
        System.out.println("test2 input=" + input.i);
    }
}

This calls test1 with 45 and test2 with 46. This works, but in my opinion, it obscures the code, and it may be a better solution to just split the Test class into two classes.

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@Mathew Thanks for the answer. So there is no binding feature as such. Will use the wrapping in private class for the time being. But it isn't elegant still. I still don't understand why DataPoints are attached to class? They make better sense at method level. –  Sanjeev Kumar Dangi Sep 26 '11 at 16:16
    
The idea is that you have a number of data points, and you can test a number of theories: for that you need a number of test methods. If you're happy with the answer, can you accept it please? –  Matthew Farwell Sep 26 '11 at 18:12
    
+1 for splitting the Test class into two classes. If test1 and test2 need different data sets to pass and make sense, then essentially they are testing different behaviors and can logically be separated. –  Su Zhang Jan 25 '14 at 2:47

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