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I have two one-to-one relations here between a class called "MailAccount" and the classes "IncomingServer" and "OutgoingServer".

(It's a Java application running on Tomcat and Ubuntu server edition).

The mapping looks like this:

MailAccount.hbm.xml

<hibernate-mapping package="com.mail.account">
    <class name="MailAccount" table="MAILACCOUNTS" dynamic-update="true">

        <id name="id" column="MAIL_ACCOUNT_ID">
            <generator class="native" />
        </id>

        <one-to-one name="incomingServer" cascade="all-delete-orphan">
        </one-to-one>
        <one-to-one name="outgoingServer" cascade="all-delete-orphan">
        </one-to-one>

    </class>
</hibernate-mapping>

IncomingMailServer.hbm.xml

<hibernate-mapping>
    <class name="com.IncomingMailServer" table="MAILSERVER_INCOMING" abstract="true">

        <id name="id" type="long" access="field">
            <column name="MAIL_SERVER_ID" />
            <generator class="native" />
        </id>

        <discriminator column="SERVER_TYPE" type="string"/>

        <many-to-one name="mailAccount" column="MAIL_ACCOUNT_ID" not-null="true" unique="true" />

        <subclass name="com.ImapServer" extends="com.IncomingMailServer" discriminator-value="IMAP_SERVER" />           
        <subclass name="com.Pop3Server" extends="com.IncomingMailServer" discriminator-value="POP3_SERVER" />

    </class>
</hibernate-mapping>

OutgoingMailServer.hbm.xml

<hibernate-mapping>
    <class name="com.OutgoingMailServer" table="MAILSERVER_OUTGOING" abstract="true">

        <id name="id" type="long" access="field">
            <column name="MAIL_SERVER_ID" />
            <generator class="native" />
        </id>

        <discriminator column="SERVER_TYPE" type="string"/>

        <many-to-one name="mailAccount" column="MAIL_ACCOUNT_ID" not-null="true" unique="true" />

        <subclass name="com.SmtpServer" extends="com.OutgoingMailServer" discriminator-value="SMTP_SERVER" />

    </class>
</hibernate-mapping>

The class hierarchy looks like this:

public class MailAccount{
 IncomingMailServer incomingServer;
 OutgoingMailServer outgoingServer;
}

public class MailServer{
 HostAddress hostAddress;
 Port port;
}

public class IncomingMailServer extends MailServer{
 // ...
}

public class OutgoingMailServer extends MailServer{
 // ...
}

public class ImapServer extends IncomingMailServer{
 // ...
}

public class Pop3Server extends IncomingMailServer{
 // ...
}

public class SmtpServer extends OutgoingMailServer{
 // ...
}

Now, here comes the problem:

Although most of the time my application runs well, there seems to be one situation in which email servers get deleted, but the corresponding account doesn't and that's when this call is made:

session.delete(mailAccountInstance);

In a one-to-one relation in Hibernate, the primary keys between mail account and its servers must be equal, if not, the relation completely gets out of sync:

Example:

Imagine, the tables are filled with data like this:

Table "MailAccount" (Current auto_increment value: 2)

MAIL_ACCOUNT_ID NAME
0               Account1
1               Account2

Table "IncomingMailServer" (Current auto_increment value: 2)

MAIL_SERVER_ID  MAIL_ACCOUNT_ID
0               0
1               1

Now, image the account with ID=1 gets deleted and new accounts get added. The following then SOMETIMES happens:

Table "MailAccount" (Current auto_increment value: 3)

MAIL_ACCOUNT_ID NAME
0               Account1
1               Account2
2               Account3

Table "IncomingMailServer" (Current auto_increment value: 2)

MAIL_SERVER_ID  MAIL_ACCOUNT_ID
0               0
1               2

This completely messes up my database consistency. How can I avoid this?

share|improve this question
2  
Without a solution, the part where you state that for a one-to-one-relation the primary keys have to be equal is wrong. There has to be either a matching table or a column with a foreign key in MAILACCOUNTS for each of the relations. –  Nicktar Dec 30 '11 at 15:05
    
Nicktar is partially true. The one to one association in your mapping is realized by the presence of the foreign key MAIL_ACCOUNT_ID in IncomingMailServer. The primary key of MailAccount and IncomingMailServer may be completely different. The diagnostic of your problem is wrong. If some mail server disappears, that's because you remove it, or because the mail server of an account is set to null, which, due to the delete-orphan config, removed the mail server from the database. –  JB Nizet Dec 30 '11 at 15:17
    
@Nicktar That's very weird. I have no such matching table. The "foreign key" MAIL_ACCOUNT_ID doesn't have anything to do with the matching. If the primary keys of Incoming-/OutgoingServer get out of sync, everything from there on gets completely screwed up. The key MAIL_ACCOUNT_ID may still reference the right MailAccount but that doesn't help. Hibernate only matches the PK's. –  Timo Jan 2 '12 at 14:27
    
@JB Nizet From what I can observe is that Hibernates matches the primary keys of Incoming/Outgoing-Server and MailAccount and if this matching gets out of sync, all the follow-up matchings are wrong! –  Timo Jan 2 '12 at 14:27
    
@valmar There has to be some kind of matching either a match-table or a foreign key column containing the primary key of the other table. I've never heard of synced primary keys in hibernate. To find the matching, you could have hibernate log it's sql-statements (along with the bind variables). –  Nicktar Jan 2 '12 at 15:25

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted
+25

If you want a shared primary key, you can use the native id generator only once. You create the mail account first, which will generate its own id, but when you create the Incoming- or OutgoingMailServer, these need to take their id from the mailAccount property.

So you need the "foreign" generator:

<class name="OutgoingMailServer">
    <id name="id" column="MAIL_SERVER_ID"> 
       <generator class="foreign"> 
           <param name="property">mailAccount</param> 
       </generator>
    </id>
    <one-to-one name="mailAccount" not-null="true" constrained="true"/>
<class>

You don't need a MAIL_ACCOUNT_ID column, since it will always be identical to the MAIL_SERVER_ID anyway.

Quite basic follow the reference about bidirectional one-to-one association on a primary key.

share|improve this answer
    
That's weird. When I do that and call session.save(mailAccountInstance) then I get a NullPointerException here at org.hibernate.tuple.entity.AbstractEntityTuplizer.getPropertyValue(AbstractEnti‌​tyTuplizer.java:521). I already checked if either the mail server or mail account which is being referenced could be null but they're not. Here is the full trace: dl.dropbox.com/u/17844821/zeug/stacktrace.txt –  Timo Jan 5 '12 at 13:40
    
@greyfairer is almost right, but the column="MAIL_SERVER_ID" attribute has to be in the id tag, not in the one-to-one tag –  Fortunato Jan 5 '12 at 19:13
    
@Fortunato thx, fixed that. –  greyfairer Jan 6 '12 at 9:34

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