Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

We found some strange values being produced, a small test case is below. This prints "FFFFFFFFF9A64C2A" . Meaning the unsigned long long seems to have been sign extended. But why ? All the types below are unsigned, so what's doing the sign extension ? The expected output would be "F9A64C2A".

#include <stdio.h>

int main(int argc,char *argv[])
{
    unsigned char a[] = {42,76,166,249};

    unsigned long long ts;
    ts = a[0] | a[1] << 8U | a[2] << 16U | a[3] << 24U;

    printf("%llX\n",ts);


    return 0;

}
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

In the expression a[3] << 24U, the a[1] has type unsigned char. Now, the "integer promotion" converts it to int because:

The following may be used in an expression wherever an int or unsigned int may be used:

[...]

If an int can represent all values of the original type, the value is converted to an int; otherwise, it is converted to an unsigned int.

((draft) ISO/IEC 9899:1999, 6.3.1.1 2)

Please note also that the shift operators (other than most other operators) do not do the "usual arithmetic conversions" converting both operands to a common type. But

The type of the result is that of the promoted left operand.

(6.5.7 3)

On a 32 bit platform, 249 << 24 = 4177526784 interpreted as an int has its sign bit set.

Just changing to

ts = a[0] | a[1] << 8 | a[2] << 16 | (unsigned)a[3] << 24;

fixes the issue (The suffix Ufor the constants has no impact).

share|improve this answer
    
Minor correction: a[1] has type unsigned char. –  Dietrich Epp Sep 26 '11 at 12:28
    
@user964970: Read again. The type of x << y has nothing to do with the type of y. –  Dietrich Epp Sep 26 '11 at 12:28
    
@Dietrich Epp: Thank you. –  undur_gongor Sep 26 '11 at 12:29
    
@user964970 didn't you read it? The type of the result is that of the promoted left operand. –  Shahbaz Sep 26 '11 at 12:30
 ts = ((unsigned long long)a[0]) | 
    ((unsigned long long)a[1] << 8U) | 
    ((unsigned long long)a[2] << 16U) | 
    ((unsigned long long)a[3] << 24U); 

Casting prevents converting intermediate results to default int type.

share|improve this answer
1  
But why is there an intermediate int result, when all types involved are unsigned types ? The culprit seems to only be the first a[0] , replacing that with (unsigned)a[0] an all is well. But why. –  user964970 Sep 26 '11 at 12:02

Some of the shifted a[i], when automatically converted from unsigned char to int, produce sign-extended values.

This is in accord with section 6.3.1 Arithmetic operands, subsection 6.3.1.1 Boolean, characters, and integers, of C draft standard N1570, which reads, in part, "2. The following may be used in an expression wherever an int or unsigned int may be used: ... — An object or expression with an integer type (other than int or unsigned int) whose integer conversion rank is less than or equal to the rank of int and unsigned int. ... If an int can represent all values of the original type ..., the value is converted to an int; otherwise, it is converted to an unsigned int. These are called the integer promotions. ... 3. The integer promotions preserve value including sign."

See eg www.open-std.org/JTC1/SC22/WG14/www/docs/n1570.pdf

You could use code like the following, which works ok:

      int i;
      for (i=3, ts=0; i>=0; --i) ts = (ts<<8) | a[i];
share|improve this answer
    
All a[i]'s that are shifted, in the example code, have the right hand side as unsigned due to the U prefix on the constant. (e.g. << 8U) , meaning e.g. the expression a[1] << 8U should have unsigned type already, according those rules. –  user964970 Sep 26 '11 at 12:25
    
@user964970: The culprit is not a[0]. However, casting a[0] to unsigned forces the result of the bitwise or to be unsigned, which truncates the sign extension that appears in a[3] << 24, which is the real culprit. –  Dietrich Epp Sep 26 '11 at 12:36

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.