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Given this example from the generics tutorial.

List<String> list = new ArrayList<>();
list.add("A");

// The following statement should fail since addAll expects
// Collection<? extends String>

list.addAll(new ArrayList<>());

Why does the last line not compile, when it seems it should compile. The first line uses a very similar construct and compiles without a problem.

Please explain elaborately.

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1  
"Why doesn't the following does not work?" is a bit weak. What exactly do you expect? And what is the error message? There are many reasons "it does not work". You should be more precise in your question to get precise answers. –  Arne Sep 26 '11 at 13:20
1  
download.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/java/generics/index.html come back when you've read and absorbed that. –  Matt Ball Sep 26 '11 at 13:20
1  
Actually, as of Java 7 this should work - diamond operator, voting for reopen, too. –  Thomas Sep 26 '11 at 13:27
2  
Pradeep, are you using Java 7? That's a prerequisite for that to compile. –  Thomas Sep 26 '11 at 13:29
3  
@PradeepKumar: if you're not using Java 7, then that is the reason why your code doesn't compile: The tutorial is targeted at Java 7. However the specific code you quote doesn't even compile on Java 7 (for other reasons). –  Joachim Sauer Sep 26 '11 at 13:33

3 Answers 3

The explanation from the Type Inference documentation seems to answer this question directly ( unless I'm missing something else ).

Java SE 7 and later support limited type inference for generic instance creation; you can only use type inference if the parameterized type of the constructor is obvious from the context. For example, the following example does not compile:

List<String> list = new ArrayList<>();
list.add("A");

  // The following statement should fail since addAll expects
  // Collection<? extends String>

list.addAll(new ArrayList<>());

Note that the diamond often works in method calls; however, for greater clarity, it is suggested that you use the diamond primarily to initialize a variable where it is declared.

In comparison, the following example compiles:

// The following statements compile:

List<? extends String> list2 = new ArrayList<>();
list.addAll(list2);
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1  
The tutorial doesn't really explain why the diamond doesn't work here. It just hand-waves and says that it "often works". –  Joachim Sauer Sep 26 '11 at 13:50
    
@Kal.Sorry to annoy you.I dint understand .Can you explain it in simple words.Sorry once again –  Pradeep Kumar Sep 26 '11 at 13:51
    
Agree. Perhaps the JLS says something. –  Mister Smith Sep 26 '11 at 13:52
    
Hmm.. It seems obvious to me. It clearly states that addAll expects Collection<? extends E> which you can't do because it could be an unknown type extending the defined type of the list and hence inference won't work. –  Kal Sep 26 '11 at 13:53
2  
@Kal: it can easily be argued that in this case it could simply infer the type String which would be correct according to the type system and which would successfully allow the call. In my opinion that's sufficient. It seems to be a restriction similar to the old "Why doesn't object instantiation use the same inference rules that are used on method invocation?" in Java 5 and Java 6 (still true in Java 7 as well). –  Joachim Sauer Sep 26 '11 at 14:02

First of all: unless you're using Java 7 all of this will not work, because the diamond <> has only been introduced in that Java version.

Also, this answer assumes that the reader understands the basics of generics. If you don't, then read the other parts of the tutorial and come back when you understand those.

The diamond is actually a shortcut for not having to repeat the generic type information when the compiler could find out the type on its own.

The most common use case is when a variable is defined in the same line it's initialized:

List<String> list = new ArrayList<>(); // is a shortcut for
List<String> list = new ArrayList<String>();

In this example the difference isn't major, but once you get to Map<String, ThreadLocal<Collection<Map<String,String>>>> it'll be a major enhancement (note: I don't encourage actually using such constructs!).

The problem is that the rules only go that far. In the example above it's pretty obvious what type should be used and both the compiler and the developer agree.

On this line:

list.addAll(new ArrayList<>());

it seems to be obvious. At least the developer knows that the type should be String.

However, looking at the definition of Collection.addAll() we see the parameter type to be Collection<? extends E>.

It means that addAll accepts any collection that contains objects of any unknown type that extends the type of our list. That's good because it means you can addAll a List<Integer> to a List<Number>, but it makes our type inference trickier.

In fact it makes the type-inference not work within the rules currently laid out by the JLS. In some situations it could be argued that the rules could be extended to work, but the current rules imply don't do it.

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@joachim.Thanks for the answers –  Pradeep Kumar Sep 26 '11 at 14:56

When compiling a method invocation, javac needs to know the type of the arguments first, before determining which method signature matches them. So the method parameter type isn't known before the argument type is known.

Maybe this can be improved; as of today, the type of the argument is independent of the context.

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