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I've been using IoC (mostly Unity) and Dependency Injection in .NET for some time now and I really like the pattern as a way to encourage creation of software classes with loose coupling and which should be easier to isolate for testing.

The approach I generally try to stick to is "Nikola's Five Laws of IoC" - in particular not injecting the container itself and only using constructor injection so that you can clearly see all the dependencies of a class from its constructor signature. Nikola does have an account on here but I'm not sure if he is still active.

Anyway, when I end up either violating one of the other laws or generally ending up with something that doesn't feel or look right, I have to question whether I'm missing something, could do it better, or simply shouldn't be using IoC for certain cases. With that in mind here are a few examples of this and I'd be grateful for any pointers or further discussion on these:

  1. Classes with too many dependencies. ("Any class having more then 3 dependencies should be questioned for SRP violation"). I know this one comes up a lot in dependency injection questions but after reading these I still don't have any Eureka moment that solves my problems:

    • a) In a large application I invariably find I need 3 dependencies just to access infrastructure (examples - logging, configuration, persistence) before I get to the specific dependencies needed for the class to get its (hopefully single responsibility) job done. I'm aware of the approach that would refactor and wrap such groups of dependencies into a single one, but I often find this becomes simply a facade for several other services rather than having any true responsibility of its own. Can certain infrastructure dependencies be ignored in the context of this rule, provided the class is deemed to still have a single responsibility?

    • b) Refactoring can add to this problem. Consider the fairly common task of breaking apart a class that has become a bit big - you move one area of functionality into a new class and the first class becomes dependent on it. Assuming the first class still needs all the dependencies it had before, it now has one extra dependency. In this case I probably don't mind that this dependency is more tightly coupled, but its still neater to have the container provide it (as oppose to using new ...()), which it can do even without the new dependency having its own interface.

    • c) In a one specific example I have a class responsible for running various different functions through the system every few minutes. As all the functions rightly belong in different areas, this class ends up with many dependencies just to be able to execute each function. I'm guessing in this case other approaches, possibly involving events, should be considered but so far I haven't tried to do it because I want to co-ordinate the order the tasks are run and in some cases apply logic involving outcomes along the way.

  2. Once I'm using IoC within an application it seems like almost every class I create that is used by another class ends up being registered in and/or injected by the container. Is this the expected outcome or should some classes have nothing to do with IoC? The alternative of just having something new'd up within the code just looks like a code smell since its then tightly coupled. This is kind of related to 1b above too.

  3. I have all my container initialisation done at application startup, registering types for each interface in the system. Some are deliberately single instance lifecycles where others can be new instance each time they are resolved. However, since the latter are dependencies of the former, in practice they become a single instance too since they are only resolved once - at construction time of the single instance. In many cases this doesn't matter, but in some cases I really want a different instance each time I do an operation, so rather than be able to make use of the built in container functionality, I'm forced to either i) have a factory dependency instead so I can force this behaviour or ii) pass in the container so I can resolve each time. Both of these approaches are frowned upon in Nikola's guidance but I see i) as the lesser of two evils and I do use it in some cases.

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5  
Please try to ask one question at a time. –  svick Sep 26 '11 at 13:29
1  
Having more than 3 dependencies is very common. For me, more than 5 dependencies is a code smell. –  Steven Sep 26 '11 at 14:38
    
Yes, I now realise I should have separated this out but as the background is all related I kind of just got carried away as I was writing. Put it down to SO inexperience. Can't refactor my question now as I have some answers... –  zeroid Sep 27 '11 at 7:28

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

In a large application I invariably find I need 3 dependencies just to access infrastructure (examples - logging, configuration, persistence)

imho infrastructure is not dependencies. I have no problem using a servicelocator for getting a logger (private ILogger _logger = LogManager.GetLogger()).

However, persistence is not infrastructure in my point of view. It's a dependency. Break your class into smaller parts.

Refactoring can add to this problem.

Of course. You will get more dependencies until you have successfully refactored all classes. Just hang in there and continue refactoring.

Do create interfaces in a separate project (Separated interface pattern) instead of adding dependencies to classes.

In a one specific example I have a class responsible for running various different functions through the system every few minutes. As all the functions rightly belong in different areas, this class ends up with many dependencies just to be able to execute each function.

Then you are taking the wrong approach. The task runner should not have a dependency on all tasks that should run, it should be the other way around. All tasks should register in the runner.

Once I'm using IoC within an application it seems like almost every class I create that is used by another class ends up being registered in and/or injected by the container.*

I register everything but business objects, DTOs etc in my container.

I have all my container initialisation done at application startup, registering types for each interface in the system. Some are deliberately single instance lifecycles where others can be new instance each time they are resolved. However, since the latter are dependencies of the former, in practice they become a single instance too since they are only resolved once - at construction time of the single instance.

Don't mix lifetimes if you can avoid it. Or don't take in short lived dependencies. In this case you could use a simple messaging solution to update the single instances.

You might want to read my guidelines.

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Thanks for the guidelines, they are useful. Still struggling on refactoring - if I break down a class I often find all the new clases still have the same dependencies so all I've done is added more dependencies to other classes that need the functions in the class I'm breaking down. I can't see at what point in this continuous refactoring I'll start to see less dependencies for each class. As for the task runner I know you're right but I need to figure out how I maintain control over execution order. Also presumably this means each module that has tasks to register will need to initialise? –  zeroid Sep 27 '11 at 7:41
    
Add an example class and I'll break it down for you so the parts uses less dependencies. –  jgauffin Sep 27 '11 at 7:51

Let me answer question 3. Having a singletons depend on a transient is a problem that container profilers try to detect and warn about. Services should only depend on other services that have a lifetime that is greater than or equals to that of their own. Injecting a factory interface or delegate to solve this is in general a good solution, and passing in the container itself is a bad solution, since you end up with the Service Locator anti-pattern.

Instead of injecting a factory, you can solve this by implementing a proxy. Here's an example:

public interface ITransientDependency
{
    void SomeAction();
}

public class Implementation : ITransientDependency
{
    public SomeAction() { ... }
}

Using this definition, you can define a proxy class in the Composition Root based on the ITransientDependency:

public class TransientDependencyProxy<T> : ITransientDependency
    where T : ITransientDependency
{
    private readonly UnityContainer container;

    public TransientDependencyProxy(UnityContainer container)
    {
        this.container = container;
    }

    public SomeAction()
    {
        this.container.Resolve<T>().SomeAction();
    }
}

Now you can register this TransientDependencyProxy<T> as singleton:

container.RegisterType<ITransientDependency,
    TransientDependencyProxy<Implementation>>(
        new ContainerControlledLifetimeManager());

While it is registered as singleton, it will still act as a transient, since it will forward its calls to a transient implementation.

This way you can completely hide that the ITransientDependency needs to be a transient from the rest of the application.

If you need this behavior for many different service types, it will get cumbersome to define proxies for each and everyone of them. In that case you could try Unity's interception functionality. You can define a single interceptor that allows you to do this for a wide range of service types.

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Thankyou, I had seen this mentioned elsewhere but this is a good explanation of how it works. –  zeroid Sep 27 '11 at 7:11

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