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Similar to another post I made, this answers that post and creates a new question.

Recap: I need to update every record in a spatial database in which I have a data set of points that overlay data set of polygons. For each point feature I want to assign a key to relate it to the polygon feature that it lies within. So if my point 'New York City' lies within polygon USA and for the USA polygon 'GID = 1' I will assign 'gid_fkey = 1' for my point New York City.

Okay so this has been achieved using multiprocessing. I have noticed a 150% increase in speed using this so it does work. But I think there is a bunch of unecessary overhead as one DB connection is required for each record.

So here is the code:

import multiprocessing, time, psycopg2

class Consumer(multiprocessing.Process):

    def __init__(self, task_queue, result_queue):
        multiprocessing.Process.__init__(self)
        self.task_queue = task_queue
        self.result_queue = result_queue

    def run(self):
        proc_name = self.name
        while True:
            next_task = self.task_queue.get()
            if next_task is None:
                print 'Tasks Complete'
                self.task_queue.task_done()
                break            
            answer = next_task()
            self.task_queue.task_done()
            self.result_queue.put(answer)
        return


class Task(object):
    def __init__(self, a):
        self.a = a

    def __call__(self):        
        pyConn = psycopg2.connect("dbname='geobase_1' host = 'localhost'")
        pyConn.set_isolation_level(0)
        pyCursor1 = pyConn.cursor()

        procQuery = 'UPDATE city SET gid_fkey = gid FROM country  WHERE ST_within((SELECT the_geom FROM city WHERE city_id = %s), country.the_geom) AND city_id = %s' % (self.a, self.a)

        pyCursor1.execute(procQuery)
        print 'What is self?'
        print self.a

        return self.a

    def __str__(self):
        return 'ARC'
    def run(self):
        print 'IN'

if __name__ == '__main__':
    tasks = multiprocessing.JoinableQueue()
    results = multiprocessing.Queue()

    num_consumers = multiprocessing.cpu_count() * 2
    consumers = [Consumer(tasks, results) for i in xrange(num_consumers)]
    for w in consumers:
        w.start()

    pyConnX = psycopg2.connect("dbname='geobase_1' host = 'localhost'")
    pyConnX.set_isolation_level(0)
    pyCursorX = pyConnX.cursor()

    pyCursorX.execute('SELECT count(*) FROM cities WHERE gid_fkey IS NULL')    
    temp = pyCursorX.fetchall()    
    num_job = temp[0]
    num_jobs = num_job[0]

    pyCursorX.execute('SELECT city_id FROM city WHERE gid_fkey IS NULL')    
    cityIdListTuple = pyCursorX.fetchall()    

    cityIdListList = []

    for x in cityIdListTuple:
        cityIdList.append(x[0])


    for i in xrange(num_jobs):
        tasks.put(Task(cityIdList[i - 1]))

    for i in xrange(num_consumers):
        tasks.put(None)

    while num_jobs:
        result = results.get()
        print result
        num_jobs -= 1

It looks to be between 0.3 and 1.5 seconds per connection as I have measure it with 'time' module.

Is there a way to make a DB connection per process and then just use the city_id info as a variable that I can feed into a query for the cursor in this open? This way I make say four processes each with a DB connection and then drop me city_id in somehow to process.

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Try to isolate the creation of your connection in the Consumer constructor, then give it to the executed Task :

import multiprocessing, time, psycopg2

class Consumer(multiprocessing.Process):

    def __init__(self, task_queue, result_queue):
        multiprocessing.Process.__init__(self)
        self.task_queue = task_queue
        self.result_queue = result_queue
        self.pyConn = psycopg2.connect("dbname='geobase_1' host = 'localhost'")
        self.pyConn.set_isolation_level(0)


    def run(self):
        proc_name = self.name
        while True:
            next_task = self.task_queue.get()
            if next_task is None:
                print 'Tasks Complete'
                self.task_queue.task_done()
                break            
            answer = next_task(connection=self.pyConn)
            self.task_queue.task_done()
            self.result_queue.put(answer)
        return


class Task(object):
    def __init__(self, a):
        self.a = a

    def __call__(self, connection=None):        
        pyConn = connection
        pyCursor1 = pyConn.cursor()

        procQuery = 'UPDATE city SET gid_fkey = gid FROM country  WHERE ST_within((SELECT the_geom FROM city WHERE city_id = %s), country.the_geom) AND city_id = %s' % (self.a, self.a)

        pyCursor1.execute(procQuery)
        print 'What is self?'
        print self.a

        return self.a

    def __str__(self):
        return 'ARC'
    def run(self):
        print 'IN'
share|improve this answer
    
Mate that worked a treat. Don't have the kudos to give you the tick of approval but that code was absolutely magic. Getting rid of the constant DB connections has easily increased the speed by another 50%. Possibly closer to 100% in some instances. Thanks again. –  EnE_ Sep 27 '11 at 15:05
    
@EnE_ : I'm glad it helped you :) . You should accept the answer, you have the right to do it because you're the owner of the question. –  Cédric Julien Sep 27 '11 at 15:13
    
Okay, I have to admit that I thought I should press the up arrow rather than the tick. 'Tick of approval' was an unfortunately self condemning turn of phrase =D –  EnE_ Sep 27 '11 at 23:47
    
I'll give it an up-tick. I'm trying to learn multi-threaded programming and this is a great tutorial. Thanks! –  KaBar Sep 30 '11 at 13:48

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